Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1271140 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1918
Filing dateSep 13, 1916
Priority dateSep 13, 1916
Publication numberUS 1271140 A, US 1271140A, US-A-1271140, US1271140 A, US1271140A
InventorsErnest Dickey
Original AssigneeDomestic Engineering Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oiling system.
US 1271140 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

EZDICKEY.

OILING' SYSTEM. APPLICATION men SEPT. 13. l9l6- Patented July 2, 1918. 2 SHEETS-SHEET lmw mm E. DICKEY.

OILING SYSTEM.

APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 13. I916.

Patented July 2, 1918.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2- hll l 01E DAYTON, OHIO, MSSIGNOR T0 THE DOMESTIC ENGINEEMG A COORATIUN 01E ()HIU.

UIIElLING- SYSTEM.

tpecitlcatlon of Letters Patent.

Patented duly .31 fwd,

application filed September 13, 1918. Serial No. 119,888.

To all whom it may concern."

Be it known that l, ERNEST Dronnr, a citizen of thelUnited States of America, re siding at Dayton, county of Montgomery, and State of Ohio, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Oilin'g Systems, of which the following is a ful, clear, and exact description.

The present invention relates to an improvement in oiling systems for combustion engines, and more particularly to that type of oiling system, wherein the mechanism is self-contained within the engine structure;

One of the objects of the present invention is to provide an oiling system which may be manufactured at small cost, easy of assemblage and efficient in operation.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, wherein a preferred form of one embodiment of the present invention is clearly illustrated.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a View partly in elevation and partly in section ofthe ower plant including an internal com-bustlon engine contain ing the present improvements.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary view of the engine, certain of the parts being shown in section and certain of the parts being shown in elevation to disclose the present improvements, and the manner in which the lubricant is distributed to the moving parts of the engine. I

Referring to the drawings, the numeral 20 designates an internal combustion engine, provided with the crank case 21, wherein is mounted the crank shaft 22. This crank shaft has associated therewith the usual connecting rod 23, which in turn is secured to a suitable piston 24. which reciprocates in the engine cylinder 25. A

The crank shaft 22 carries a pinion 26, which meshes with and drives the pinion 27 carried by the cam shaft 28 of the engine. This pinion 27 has associated therewith a cam 29 which is-so positioned that it contacts with a valve rod 30 and tends to actuate one of the valves of the engine, as is well understood.

Adjacent to the pinion 26, another pinion 29 is mounted on the shaft 22 which meshes with the large spur gear 31, carried by the projects down into the crank case of the engine, so that a. large portion of the wheel is lmmersed in the'body of lubricant 33.

pinion 27, so that as the lubricant is picked.

up by the large gear wheel 31 and transferred to the pinion 29, it will in turn be thrown into contact with the cam shaft pinion 27.

' By again referring to Fig. 2, it will be noted that as the lubricant strikes the pinion 27, it will be thrown in the direction of the arrows against one of a pair of counterweights 34, which are mounted upon the crank shaft of the engine.

These counter-weights are so positioned on the crank shaft of the'engine that they lie in alinement with the interior face of the cylinder and the exterior face of the piston, in such a manner that as the oil or lubricant is thrown into contact with these counter-weights, the rotary edect thereof will throw the oil upwardly into contact with the moving piston, and thereby efficiently lubricate the side walls of the cylinder. @ne of the counter-weights will receive a certain amount. of lubricant from the. rotary ,efi'ect of the large pinion or spur wheel 31, while the other counter-weight will receive an additional supply of oil from the rotary effect of the cam shaft pinion 27 The crank shaft of the engine, as has been stated heretofore, is mounted in the engine frame, one end of said crank shaft being mounted in the ball bearing35, while the opposite end thereof is mounted in the roller bearing 36. The oil throwing efi'ect of the pinion 27 and of the counter-weights 34 will also serve to lubricate both the ball and roller bearing, as is clearly shown in Fig. 2.

Uil catchers 37 are provided on the outer end of the bearing mountings and prevent the oil from seeping out of the engine frame. These oil catchers are provided by forming the engine casing with a lurality of; ducts or grooves 38, within w ich are till till

mounted arms provided with flanges 39. A

return duct 40 is in communication with the ducts 38 and tends to lead the oil back to the main reservoir in the bottom of 'the crank w llll The engine, which is preferably used in the present instance, has been described as being of the combustion type, and preferably uses hydrocarbon or other oil as a basis for its fuel.

While the form of mechanism herein shown and described constitutes a preferred form of embodiment of the invention, it is to be understood that other forms might be adopted, all coming within the scope of the claims which follow,

I claim- 1. In an oiling system for combustion en gines, the combination with a combustion engine, including a crank case constituting an oil reservoir; a crank shaft mounted in said crank case; means associated with said crank case for extending into said oil reservoir and adapted to pump oil therefrom; a cam shaft gearingadapted to be driven by said crank shaft and so associated therewith as to lie in the path of the pumped oil; and

means associated with the crank shaft, adapted to receive oil from the oil pumping means, andalso from the cam shaft gearing whereby said oil will be thrown into contact with other moving parts of the engine.

2. In a device of the character described,

the combination with a combustion enginehaving a crank case adapted to contain a body of lubricant; a crank shaft mounted in said crank case, and having a gear element mounted thereon; a coiiperating gear wheel associated therewith and adapted to normally rotate in the body of lubricant, the gear element on the crank shaft of said gear wheel constituting a geared pump for transferring the lubricant from the bottom of the crank case; a camshaft provided with a driven pinion; a driving pinion for said cam shaft, coiiperating with the driven pinion and mounted upon the crank shaft, the said driven cam shaft pinion being so positioned as to lie in the path of the pumped lubricant; and a counter-weight mounted upon the crank shaft and so associated with the geared pump as to receive a portion of emma the pump lubricant and adapted to transfer the lubricant to other moving parts of the engine.

- 3. In a device of the character described, the combination with a combustion engine, having a crank case adapted to contain a body of lubricant; a crank shaft mounted in said crank case; a pair of cooperating gear elements driven by said crank shaft and so associated in the crank case as to pump a portion of the lubricant into contact with the moving parts of the engine, one of said gear elements being mounted directly on the crank shaft and the other of said gear elements being mounted on the crank case.

4. In a device of the character described, the combination with a combustion engine having a crank case adapted to contain a body of lubricant, said engine including a cylinder and'a piston; a crank shaft connected with said piston; a gear element mounted on said crank shaft; a cooperating gear element mounted on the crank case and adapted to extend into the body of the lubricant; a driving pinion carried by said crank shaft and a gear element driven thereby and adapted to carry oil transmitted from the gear elements above-mentioned to the moving parts of the engine.

5-. In a device of the character described, the combination with a combustion engine including a crank case adapted to contain a body of lubricant, and a cylinder and piston; a crank shaft mounted in said crank case having counterweights; a geared pump driven by said crank shaft and adapted to pump the lubricant from the crank case into contact with said counterweights whereby the lubricant will be delivered to the moving parts of the engine.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature in the presence of two subscribing witnesses ERNEST DICKEY.

Witnesses:

J. W. MCDONALD J E. JOHNSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2523764 *Jul 27, 1946Sep 26, 1950John W SpeakerLubricating device for elevator drive mechanisms
US2559134 *Jul 2, 1948Jul 3, 1951Uebelhoer Brothers IncLubrication system
US2681126 *Mar 26, 1951Jun 15, 1954Searls Edward CharlesLubrication of gearing
US2701906 *Nov 5, 1953Feb 15, 1955Casey PatrickOiler for machine shop shaper cutting tools
US2744417 *Nov 24, 1950May 8, 1956Auguste Huguenin RobertMachine gear wheels
US2762456 *Jan 14, 1953Sep 11, 1956Schiess AgSplash lubricating means for gearing
US4483210 *Dec 24, 1981Nov 20, 1984Harutaka MayuzumiMultiple stage speed change gear device
US4795001 *Mar 31, 1988Jan 3, 1989Sanshin Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaTwo-cycle fuel-injection engine
US5887678 *Jun 19, 1997Mar 30, 1999Briggs & Stratton CorporationLubrication apparatus for shaft bearing
US8722610Oct 19, 2010May 13, 2014Rhodia OperationsAuto-emulsifying cleaning systems and methods for use
Classifications
U.S. Classification184/13.1, 74/606.00R, 123/73.00A, 74/467, 123/196.00R
Cooperative ClassificationF16H57/0457
European ClassificationF16H57/04V