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Publication numberUS1271181 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 2, 1918
Filing dateJun 17, 1916
Priority dateJun 17, 1916
Publication numberUS 1271181 A, US 1271181A, US-A-1271181, US1271181 A, US1271181A
InventorsWilliam S Lenhart
Original AssigneeWilliam S Lenhart
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carbureter.
US 1271181 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

w. 8. LENHART.

CARBURETER.

' APPLICATION FILED JUNE I]. 916. 1,271,181, Patented July 2, 1918.

2 SHEEIS-SHEET I.

l 7 am ill en/rgarl UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE- WILLIAM s. LEN'HART, or ATLANTIC CITY, NEW JERSEY.

omnunnrna.

. Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July 2, 1918.

Application filed June 17, 1916. Serial Nc. 104,226.

To all whom it may concern.- 4

Be it known that I; WILLIAM. S. LnNHAn'r,

a citizen of the United States, residin at Atlantic City, county of Atlantic, and tate of New Jersey, have invented new and'useful Improvements in Carbureters, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to new and useful improvements in carbureters, and has for its ob ect to provide a device of this character for use with internal combustion engines where the products of combustion will be utilized to heat the air which is conveyed to the carbureting chamber and passed through the gasolene or other volatile liquid to form a highly explosive mixture for use in the engine, said mixture when leaving the carburetin chamber being in a dry state.

A urther object o the invention is to provide a carbureting chamber surrounding a "-central' standpipe,'the latter having communication with the air and gasolene inlets, so that they may be mixed in the standpipe as well as in the carbureting chamber, thereby providing two compartments in which .the carbureting action may .take place, so that either a dry or moist mixture may be produced.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a casing having a duct leading from the inlet to an annular-passageway from which lead numerous small passageways orv ducts to the carbureting chamber at the lower end thereof, so that the air is delivered to the carbureting chamber at the lower end thereof, and caused to passpthrough the lvolatile liquid where the air w1ll mix with Saidllquid and produce-a relatlvely dry 3 mixture, so that its use in an engine will eliminate or greatly reduce the formation f of carbon on the inner walls of the engine cylinders. I

Another object of the invention is to provide means for priming without passing the air'th'rough the volatile liquid preliminary to starting an engine.

Another ob]ect of the invention is to provide means for producing a partial vacuum in thegasolene reservoir or float chamber, so that the gasolenemay he maintained at a predetermined level in the float chamber re-' 'gar'dless of the position of the gasolene sup- With these ends in view, my invention consists in the details 'of construction and I combination ofelements hereinafter set forth and then especially designated bythe claims.

In order that those skilled in the art to I which this invention appertains, may understand how to make and use the same, I will describe its constructionv in detail, referring by numerals to the accompanying drawingsforming a part of this application, in which Figure 1, is a vertical sectional vi 'ew of my improved carburetor.

Fig. 2, a section at the line 2 2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3, is a section at the line 33 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4, is' a bottom view of a carbureter showing portions thereof in section to clearly illustrate the constructions.

Fig. 5, is a segmental sectional, view on the line 55 of Fig. 4; and

Fig. 6, is a segmental sectional view of the standpipe illustrating the construction-of the priming, duct and the spray nozzle.

Incarrying out my invention as here embodied 2 represents the exhaust pipe of an explosive engine surrounded by a shield 'or jacket 3 provided with aninlet as at 3 havnous member 12 such as wire gauze, the same 7 being held in-pl'ace by the end of the pipe 5 which is threaded into the enlarged portion of the inlet 6. From the inlet-6 leads a vertical duct 13 to an annular passageway 14 at the upperend of the casing said passageway l passing entirely around the casing and communicating with numerous small vertical passageways or ducts .15 disposed around the carburetin chamber '16 and communicating' therewit at; its lower end through holes 17 .some of which areslightly higher than the rest as at 18 to permit the formation of a gasolene inlet 19, also lead g to the lower end of the carbureting chamber.

Within the carbureting chamber and central thereof is situated the standpipe 20 communicating with a horizontal duct or air inlet pipe 21 which terminates ad acent the end of the inlet 6 of the carbureter and communicates with said inlet. This passageway is controlled by the throttle or butterfly valve 22, operated in any suitable manner as by a handle23. This inlet or passageway -is also provided with a drip cock 24. The upper end of the standpipe 2O terminates on line with the upper end of the carbureter casing 7, and on the latter is mounted a cap or cover 25 secured to the casing 1n any suitable manner as by bolts 26, and having formed therewith the central depending cup shaped member 27 open at the top and bottom and provided with inlet slots or openings 28, and the lower end of this cup shaped member engages the upper end of the standpipe 20 when the cap or cover is in pos1t1on upon the casing, and if found desirable, a gasket 29 may be placed between the contacting parts. 7

- This cap or cover is also provided with a conduit 30, one end of which communicates with the interior of the cup shaped member 27, the other end terminating atthe lower face of the cap or cover 25 beyond the edge 7 thereof. .7

Within the cup shaped member 27 1s rotatably mounted the valve member or damper 31 having slots 32 adapted to aline with the slots 28 and provided with a cutout portion or notch 33 to prevent the closlng of the conduit 30 when said member is rotated, and in 7 order that said member may be rotated -I provide means 34, such as an operatin han dle, which is secured to the valve mem er or damper 31, and passes through a slot35 in the cup shaped portion of the cover 25.

To the cover 25 is attached the outlet pipe 36 having an opening 37 in communication withthe cup shaped member of the cover, said opening being surrounded by avalve seat 38 with which coacts a valve 39 having a stem 40 passing through a bridge-41 across the opening 37 and having a spring 42 coiled thereabout, one end resting against the un derside of the bridge as the stationary member, andthe other end against a nut 43 or its equivalent mounted on the end ofth'e stem 40. This valve operates inward with rela-' tion to the outlet, so that the mixture may be drawn into said outlet from the carbureting chamber by the suction of the engine.

The outlet pipe 36 is further provided with an opening its side wall, and a valve seat 45 is formed thereabout with which coactsia valve 46 having-a stem 47 passing through the bridge 48 disposed across the opening 44 and having a spring 49 coiled thereabout and resting against the bridge 48, and a nut or its equivalentmounted on the end of the stem for normally hold- -*ing the valve'closed. This valve operates outward, so that should the engine back fire acts as a guide wall.

or explode prematurely, the premure produced thereby within the outlet pipe 36 will be relieved.

The passageway through the outlet 36 is bureting chamber 16 and surrounding the standpipe20 is situated the bafile member 53 preferably formed from sheet metal andshaped to produce a flange 54 arranged to rest upon the bottom wall of the carbureting chamber between the standpipe and the side walls of said chamber, and from this flange extends the upwardly and outwardly projecting wall 55 having perforations 56 therein, and from the upper portion of this wall extends the upwardly and inwardly projecting wall 57 having perforations 58 therein of smaller diameter than the perforations 56.

The upper and inner portion of the wall 57 terminates adjacent the standpipe 20, and from this portion of said wall extends the upwardly projecting imperforate guide wall 59, and from the up or portion of thiswall extends the upward y and outwardly projecting wall 60 having perforations 61 there in of less diameter than the perforations in either of the other walls. The other edge of this wall terminates adjacent the side walls of the carbureting chamber, and from this outer portionextends the upwardly project-- ing imperforate outer wall 62, and from the upper port on of this wall extends the inwardly pro ecting horizontal wall 63 having perforations 64 therein of still less diameter than the others, and this wall terminates adjacent the standpipe,from'whic'h portion extends the upwardly projecting imperforate guide wall 65, and from the upper portion of this guide wall extends the upwardly and outwardly projecting wall 66 on a less incline than the other inclined walls, and this wall 66 is provided with perforations 67 of less' diameter than any of the others, and from the outer portion of this wall extends the upwardly projecting imperforate outer wall 68,

from which extends the inwardly projecting horizontal wall 69 having perforations 70 therein of still smaller diameter than the perforations in any of the other walls, and from the inner portion of this wall extends the upwardly projecting imperforate flange 71 which surrounds the standpipe 20 and also .The baflie member is placed in the car-v buretin chamber with the guide Walls and upper ange preferablyin contact with the standpipe and with the outer-walls in con tact with the walls of the carbureting chamber, so that the air and vapor as it passes through the carbureting chamber will be broken up and thoroughly mixed.

Beside the carburetingcasing 7 and pref- 130- lene supply pipe 74 which communicates erably formed integral therewith is situated the gasolene reservoir 72, forming a float chamber 73, in communication with the carbureting chamber through the passageway 19. Into the inlet chamber 73 from the lower end thereof projects the vertical gasowith the pipe leading from a gasolene supply tank, and said pipe 74 has a longitudinal passageway 75 therethrough, the upper end of which terminates in a valve seat 76 with which coacts a needle valve 77 slidably mounted in and guided by a threaded plug 78 mounted in a threaded opening 79' in the cap or cover 80 of the gasolene reservoir, said cover being preferably threaded into the reservoir.

The plug 78 is provided with downwardly projecting arms ,81, in which are pivoted levers 82 connected with a collar 83 carried by the needle valve and with the arms 84 of the float 85. The plug 78 and the parts attached thereto are adjustable to regulate the predetermined height of the volatile liquid within the reservoir,'and when the proper adjustment is obtained, the same is held in position by the cap 86 which acts as a jam nut, and is threaded upon the plug until it engages the outer surface of the cover 80. i

From the interior of the reservoir or float chamber at its upper end leads a canal 87 with which alines the conduit 30, thereby forming a passageway from the interior of the reservoir 72 to the cup shaped member 27, so that when the engine to which the carbureter is connected is operating, the air in the reservoir will be sucked therefrom by the pulsations of the engine, thereby forming a partial vacuum within the reservoir, which will cause the volatile liquid contained in the supply tank to run into the reservoir regardless of the position of the supply tank with relation: to the reservoir within certain limits, thereby making it un-' necessary to place the supply tank at a greater height than the reservoir. The reservoir is also provided with adrip cock 88 in the bottom wall thereof, whereby said reservoir may be drained.

Within the standpipe 20 is formed a rib 89 having a'passageway or gasolene duct 90 therein, the upper end of which is in communication with the interior of the standpipe, and this end of the opening is preferably on an angle and threaded as at 91 to receive the spray nozzle 92 which is threaded exteriorly. The lower end of the duct 90 is in communication through a channel 93 with the plunger chamber 94, the shell of which is .formed integral with the carbureter casing 7, and the plunger chamber 94 is also in communication through two openings 95 and 96 with the carbureting chamber, and'in the plunger chamber 94 isslida'bly mounted the plunger 97 having a stem 98 passing through the gland 99 threaded in the open end of the plunger chamber 94, and to this stem 98 is secured a lever or means 100 for actuating the plung'er in one direction, said plunger being normally forced toward the opening 93 by a spring 101 coiled about the stem of the plunger within the plunger chamber 94.

102.denotes a valve chamber formed in. a 7 5 shell interiorly with the carbureting casing, and with the shell of the plunger chamher, and this chamber 102 is separated from the chamber 94 by a partition 103 in which a is formed a hole 104 thereby forming a com- 80 munication between said chambers, and the chamber 102 is in communication with the carbureting chamber by an angular inlet opening 112.

Within the valve chamber 102 is mounted a valve 105 engaging a seat 106 formed in the valve chamber, and this valve is provided with an opening 107 passing entirely. therethrough and arranged to aline with the opening 112 and 104. The valve is held upon its seat by a spring 108 mounted within the valve chamber and coiled about the valve stem 109 carried by the valve and passing through the gland 110 threaded into the open end of the valve chamber. This construction makes it unnecessary to pack the valve chamber as the valve is always held upon its seat, and the openings which it controls are opened or closed by the rotation thereof which is accomplished by any 100 suitable means such as a lever 111 mounted on the outer end of the valve stem.

When it is desired to start the engine to which my improved carbureter is attached, the same may be primed by merely drawing 105 the plunger 97 outward-against the action of'its spring until the hole 96 is uncovered, or the plunger beyond the same, at which time the volatile fluid will enter the plunger chamber 94 between the plunger and the 110.

channel 93, the opening 95 acting as a relief so that any of the liquid in the plunger chamber back of the plunger will be forced out.

When the plunger 97 is released, its 115 sprlng 101' will act thereon and quickly force it inward, thus forcing the liquid through the channel 93 and upward through the liquid duct 90, where it will be sprayed through the nozzle 92 into the standpipe 20. As the liquid is sprayed from the nozzle it will mix with the air drawn through the standpipe 20, either from the atmosphere through the openings 8, or from the shield 3, thereby forming the mixture which is drawn through the outlet pipe 36 into the evenly to all of the ducts or passageways 15, the air then passing through said ducts into the carbureting chamber through the opening 17, the carbureting chamber con; taining the volatile liquid.

As ther air passes through the volatile liquid, it will be mixed therewith and a very highly explosive mixture produced, which will be drawn from the carbureting chamher through the openings 28 in the cup shaped member, into the outlet pipe 36 by the pulsations of the engine, and' from which place the mixture is distributed to the engine, the distribution being controlled by the throttle 51. If at any time a premature explosion should occur causing a back fire, the valve 39 will be automatically closed, and the pressure in the outlet pipe 36 relieved by the valve 46.

The carbureting chamber is supplied with the volatile liquid from the reservoir 72, through the passageway 19, so that the liquid in the carbureting chamber will be maintained at the same height as that in the reservoir, which is maintained at a predetermined height by the float 85 which controls the needle valve 77, and this reservoir v is supplied with volatile liquid from a supply tank, and is caused to-flow from said supply tank into the reservoir by the vacuum maintained in the upper portion of the reservoir through the 'medium of the canal 87 and conduit 30 which form a communication between the reservoir and a cup shaped member 27, the vacuum being produced by the pulsations of the engine which an to -producethe mixture which is drawn draws the air from the reservoir.

If for any reason it is not desirable to pass the air through the volatile liquid as above described, the throttle valve 22' may be opened to permit the passage of air, through the standpipe, and the valve 105 opened to permit the passage of the volatile liquid from 'the carbureting chamber 16 through the opening 112, through the opening 107 the valve, the hole 104,. the plunger chamber 94, the channel 93, the duct 90, and the nozzle 92 into the standpipe 20, where it will be mixed with the into the outlet of the engine.

If found desirable the lever 111 and op erating handle 23 may be connected together, so that as the valve 105 is opened, the throttle 22 will also be opened, thus perpipe 36 by; the pulsations Imitting the two to be operated in unison when it is desired to use; the two forms of carbureting herein described.

Of course I do not wish to be limited to the exact details of construction as herein shown, as these may be varied within the limits of the appended claims without departing from the spirit of my invention.

Having thus fully described my invention, what I claim as new and useful, is

1. A carbureter comprising a casing having an air inlet, an annular passageway at the upper end thereof, a vertical duct communicating with said passageway and the air inlet, a carbureting chamber having an outlet, small vertical air inlet ducts surrounding the carbureting chamber in communica- 2. A carbureter. comprising a casing having an air inlet, an annular passageway at the upper end thereof, a vertical duct com,

municating with said passageway and the air inlet, a carbureting chamber'having an outlet, small vertical air inlet ducts surrounding the carbureting chamber in communication with the annular, passageway and the carbureting chamber at the lower end thereof, a cover for said casing provided with a depending cup shaped member said member having openings therein, means for regulating the size of said openings, a valve and throttle controlled outlet pipe carried by the cover and in communication with the cup shaped member, a battle member provided with a plurality of perforated walls situated in thecarbureting chamber, the perforations diminishing in size successively from the lower toi the upper end, a stand-' pipe within the carbureting chamber extend ing from top to bottom in communication with the air inlet and the cup shaped member, means'communicating with the carbureting chamber and with said standpipe whereby a charge of 'gasolene may be sprayed into said standpipe, and 'a reservoir comoutlet, small vertical air inlet ducts surrounding the carbureting chamber in communication with the annular passageway and with the carbureting chamber at the lower end thereof, a cover forsaid casing provided with a depending cup shaped member said member having openings therein, means for regulating the size of said openings, a valve and throttle controlled outlet pipe carried by the cover and in communication with the cup shaped member, a battle member provided with a plurality of perforated walls situated in the carbureting chamber, the perforations diminishing in size successively from the lower to the upper end, a standpipe within the carbureter cham-' ber extending from top to bottom in communication with the air inlet and the cup.

shaped member, means communicating with the carbureting chamber and with said standpipe whereby a charge of gasolene may be sprayed into said standpipe, ing a shell formed integral with the bottom of the carbureter casing at the lower end of the standpipe, said shell having a valve and comprisv chamber and a plunger chamber therein separated from each other, andin communication through ahole, the valve chamber being in communication with the earbureting chamber, a valve situated within said valve chamber, the plunger chamber having holes leading to the carbureting chamber, a plungersituated in said chamber, a rib in the standpipe having a longitudinal duct or passageway, a canal leading from the plunger WILLIAM s'. LENHART.

Witness M. Teams.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4250126 *Jun 18, 1979Feb 10, 1981Dow YatesChlorine generator and method
US4326490 *Nov 30, 1979Apr 27, 1982Combustion Research, Inc.Fuel preheater for internal combustion engines
US4441477 *Jul 29, 1981Apr 10, 1984George HoltFor use with an internal combustion engine
US4951617 *Sep 22, 1989Aug 28, 1990Fred LinamenAttachable intake valve assembly and method for using same
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/123, 261/41.1, 261/75, 261/65, 261/DIG.210, 261/DIG.600
Cooperative ClassificationY10S261/21, Y10S261/06, B01F3/04517