Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1278140 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1918
Filing dateMay 9, 1918
Priority dateMay 9, 1918
Publication numberUS 1278140 A, US 1278140A, US-A-1278140, US1278140 A, US1278140A
InventorsDaniel J Golden
Original AssigneeDaniel J Golden
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sporting-shoe.
US 1278140 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

0.1. GOLDEN.

SPORTING SHOE.

APPLICATION FILED ram/9.1918.

Patented Sept. I0, 1918.

" E s'ra'rns rn DANIEL Jl. GOLDEN, OF BROCKTON, MASSACHUSETTS.

A SPORTING-SHOE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

PatentedjSept. 10, 1918.-

Applcation filed May 9, 1918. Serial No. 233,562.

To all 'whom t may concern.'

Be it known that I, DANIEL J. GOLDEN, a

citizen of -the United States, residing at Brockton, in the county of Plymouth and -State of Massachusetts, have invented new andV presenting a neat and desirable ap' pearance.

The object of the invention is to provlde an improved construction whereby the'area of the leather portion of the upper is reduced to minimize the cost of the material, and a secure and durable connection isprovided between the exposed portion 0f the upper and the rubber outer sole.

The invention is embodied in the improve-l ments which I will now proceed to describe and claim.

Of the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this specification,-

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a partly completed shoe embodying the invention.

Fig. 2 is a section on line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of thev completed shoe, a portion of the upper being broken away. y

Fig. 4 is a section on line 4.-4. of Fig. 3.

Figs. 5 and 6 are sectional views illustrating different modes of operation of connecting the rubber outer sole with the upper.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view illustrating a reinforced lconstruction.

The same reference characters indicate the same parts in all of the figures.

In making the upper of my. improved shoe, I assemble a" top member 12 which includes portions 'of the vamp and quarters, and is docked at its lower portion so that its lower edge is spaced from the inner sole of the shoe. and a textile fabric member 13, which includes supplemental portions of the vamp and quarters and is secured to the lower edge portion of the top member, preferably by a line of stitches 14. The top member 12 is preferably of leather, and the fabric member 13 isI preferably composed of duck orcanvas having suitable tensile strength. I prefer to form the fabric member 13 as a lining which is co-extensive with the top member 12, and is attached thereto in the usual or any suitable manner, the lower portion of the member 13 projecting below the top member and being attached to the inner sole 15. As here shown, the lower edge of the member 13 is turned inwardly upon the inner sole and is secured thereto by clenched fastenings 16, such as lasting tacks driven during the operation of lasting the upper upon the inner'sole.

Itvwill be seen by reference to Figs. 1 and 2, that when thel -upper vis lasted, the lower` edge of the top member 12 'forms a downwardly facing shoulder which is spaced above the inner sole.

17 represents an elastic outer sole made of rubber, ora composition containing rubber, said outer sole being formed to extend from end to end of the shoe and being preferably thickened at its rear portion to form a heel, and atits fore portion to form a trea/d, the intermediate portion being preferably reduced in thickness to form a shank.

18 represents an upstanding flange which, in thecompleted shoe coheres to and covers the margin of the outer sole, and also coheres t0 and covers the portion of the fabric member 13 between the inner sole and the top member 12, or,l below the-lower edge of said top member. The fiange 18 is of textile fabric, which may bey frictioned and caused to cohere both to the outer sole and to the fabric member13 by the process of vulcanization, the vulcanization of the outer applied thereto, and the projecting portion of the flange 18 'being vulcanized to the fabric member 13. The flange 18 may be applied tothe member 13 before .its at tachment to the outer sole, as indicated by Fig. 5, or after its attachment tothe outer sole, as indicated by Fig. 6. It will be understood that the flange 18 may be caused to cohere tothe outer sole and to the fabric member 13 in any .suitable way, or by any suitable process which4 will result in a firm unionl between the said parts. The cohesion may be caused, therefore, by a vulcanizing process, or lby a process such as the so-called acid rocess practised without heat.

The ange 18 is preferably so formed at its upper edge that it abuts against the shoulder formed by the lower edge of the top member 12, as shown by Figs. 3 and 4, the outer surface of the flange 18 and the outer surface of the top member 12 being substantially flush with each other. It will be seen that the flange 18 may be made of a single layer of textile fabric, such as duck or canvas, or of a plurality of layers suitably and intimately connected. The fabric member 13 may also consist of a single layer, or a plurality of intimately connected layers.

As shown by Fig. 7, the fabric member 13 does not necessarily cover the entire inner surface of the top member 12, and it may be formed as a relatively narrow strip secured near its upper edge to the top member 12 by the stitches 14. Fig. 7 shows the fabric member 13 provided with a rein forcing member- 13, which may be a layer of any suitable reinforcing material which may be attached to the textile fabric member. the top member, and the inner sole.

It will now be seen that the docking of the top member 12 results in a considerable saving`of the material of the top member, which is an important consideration when said member is made of leather. 1t will also.v be seen that the fabric member 13 firmly secured to the top member, as by the stitches 14, and by the usual stitches at other parts of the upper, and secured to the inner sole by means such as the lasting tacks 1G, constitutes a strong and durable connection between the top member and the inner sole, the textile fabric flange, united as described, to the fabric member 13, and to the rubber outer sole, constitilting a secure connection between the upper and the outer sole.

I claim:

1. A shoe comprising an inner sole, an upper composed of a docked top member which includes portions of the Vamp and quarters, and has its lower edge spaced from the inner sole, and a textile fabric member which includes supplemental portions of the vamp and quarters, and is secured to the top member, and to the inner sole, a rubber outer sole, and an upstanding flange of textile fabric secured to the margin of the outer sole and to said fabric member.

2. A shoe comprising an inner sole, an upper composed of a docked top member which includes portions of the vamp and quarters, and has its lower edge spaced from the inner sole, and a textile fabric member which includes supplemental portions of the vamp and quarters, and is secured to the top member., and to the inner sole, a rubber outer sole, and an upstanding flange of textile fabric secured to the margin of the outer sole and to said fabric member, the upper edge of said flange being abutted against the lower edge of said top member.

3. A shoe comprising an inner sole, an upper composed of a docked top member which includes portions of the vamp and quarters, and has its lower edge spaced from the inner sole, and a textile fabric member formed as a lining for the top member and projecting below the latter to constitute supplemental portions of the vamp and quarters, said fabric member being secured to the lower edge portion of the top member and to the inner sole, a rubber outer sole, and an upstandng flange of textile fabric secured to the margin of the outer sole and to said fabric member.

a. A shoe comprising an inner sole, an up per composed of a docked top member which includes portions of the vamp and quarters and has its lower edge spaced from the inner sole, and a textile fabric member which -includes supplemental portions of the vamp and quarters, stitches securing said fabric member to the lower edge portion of the top member, fastening means securing the fabric member to the inner sole, a rubber outer sole, and an upstanding flange of textile fabric coheringto and covering the margin of the outer sole and the said fabric member between the inner sole and the lower edge of the top member.

5. A shoe comprising an inner sole, an upper composed of a docked top member which includes portions of the vamp and.

quarters and has its lower edge spaced from the inner sole, and a textile fabric member formed as a lining for the top member and projecting below the latter to constitute supplemental portions of the ramp and quarters, stitches securing said fabric member to the lower edge portion of the top member, fastening means securing the fabric member to the inner sole, a rubber outer sole, and an upstanding flange of textile fabric cohering to and covering the margin of the outer sole and the said fabric member between the inner sole and the lower edge of the top member.

6. A shoe comprising an inner sole7 an upper composed of a docked top member which includes portions of the ramp anl `fpiarters, and has itslower edge spaced from the inner sole, and a textile fabric member which includes supplemental portions` of the vamp and quarters, and is secured te the top member, and to the inner sole, a rubber outer sole, an upstanding flange of textile fabric secured to the margin of the outer sole and to the said fabric member, the upper also including an internal reinforcing member attached to 'the textile fabric member, the top member, and the inner sole.

In testimony whereof l' have allixed my signature.

Dif-HULL J. ltlillll'i.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2815589 *Jan 20, 1955Dec 10, 1957Bates Shoe CompanySkeleton-lined shoe, with attaching strip for its upper
US2995839 *Jun 15, 1959Aug 15, 1961Cronin Denis WLight shoe sole assembly
US5285546 *Nov 28, 1989Feb 15, 1994Lowa-Schuhfabrik Lorenz Wagner Gmbh & Co. KgShoe characterized by a plastic welt
US5732479 *Feb 26, 1996Mar 31, 1998Akzo Nobel NvShoe with laminate embedded in spray-moulded compound sole
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/14, 36/46.5
Cooperative ClassificationA43B7/125