Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1278320 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 10, 1918
Filing dateDec 22, 1916
Priority dateDec 22, 1916
Publication numberUS 1278320 A, US 1278320A, US-A-1278320, US1278320 A, US1278320A
InventorsGilbert S Ellithorpe
Original AssigneeGilbert S Ellithorpe
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe-tread.
US 1278320 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. S. ELLITHORPE.

SHOE TREAD.

APPLICATION FILED M6 22. 1916.

1 378,329.. Patented Sept 10, 1918.

' ZZZ/3725]? 6 256??? 513 [war 6. @971 e g Ufa- T GILBERT S. ELLITHORPE, 0F ROGERS PARK, ILLINOIS.

SHOE-TREAD.

Application filed December 22, 1916.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, GILBERT S. ELLI- THORPE, a citizen of the United States, residing at Rogers Park, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Im rovements in Shoe-Treads, of which the ollowing is a specification.

My invention relates to improvements in shoe treads.

One of the objects of my invention is to provide resilient, cushions for insertion in relatively hard or stiff shoe treads, such as the heel and sole of boots and shoes, whereby to absorb the shock usually imparted to the wearer by the impact, of the otherwise unyielding hard treads of stifl-soled shoes, to render walking more comfortable, quiet, certain and less fatiguing and to prolong the wear of the tread.

A specific object of my invention is to provide a resilient, durable plug, such as may be made of relatively soft, elastic rubber, preferably, having a wear-resisting surface for contact with the roadway, and compressible, for insertion within a restricted orifice provided for it, within the tread of the shoe, and so constructed as to provide a closed air space, between the plug and tread, to thereby produce an auxiliary, pneumatic cushion, cooper-able with the yielding plug to accomplish the shock absorbing function.

Another object of my invention is to provide a metallic receptacle, for the cushion, inscrtible in the relatively unyielding portion of the tread, of the sole and heel of a shoe. and through which fastening means may be passed to secure the outer layer of the relatively stiff tread to the overlying portion of the shoe.

Other and further objects of my invention will become readily understood, by persons skilled in the art, from a consideration of the following description when taken in conjunction with the drawings, wherein- Figure 1 is a plan vicwof the heel of a shoe showing my cushion inserted therein.

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view, taken on line 22 of Fig. 1, showing the preferred form of the cushion insert.

Fig. 3 is a modification of a cushion inserted in a tread.

In all the views the same reference characters are employed to indicate.- similar parts.

While I have shown, in Fig. 1, the cushion -Specification of Letters Patent.

Serial No. 138,308.

inserted in the heel of a shoe, they are equally as well adapted for insertionin the soles of shoes, whereby to compensate, to some extent, in the latter instance, for the lack of spring of stiff soled shoes, in walking.

5 is the tread of the heel, or sole of a shoe, secured to a part 6 by any suitable means. The tread 5 may be made of relatively hard, or semi-vulcanized rubber, leather, wood, fiber or the like, provided on its outer sur- Patented Sept. 10, 1918.

face with perforations 7 for inclusion of the cushion plug 8. The perforations 7 are annularly and laterally extended, as at 9, for the radially projecting flange 10 of the plug. The plug, or cushion 8, is provided with a central cavity, or depression 11, which, in connection with the inner surface 12 of the tread 5, forms an inclosed air space, or cooperating pneumatic cushion, when the cushion 8 is compressed, as by walking.

IVhen pressure is applied to the tread surface 13, of the cushion plug, it is laterally compressed, as the result ,of the vertically applied pressure, and the space 14 is pro-' vidcd, in the orifice 7, within which the resilient member 8 may laterally expand. The air within the space 11, is thereby com? pressed and contributes largely to the resilient effect of the cushion body 8.

In Fig. 2- I have shown a tread plate 15, embedded in the cushion portion 8, and composed of a relatively hard tough substance, of any suitable character to provide a larger and more refractory bearing surface for the cushion to take the wear, or prevent slipping. such as fiber, metal or other material, keyed to the cushion 8 by an annular dove-tail key 16, or otherwise. fastened so as to be inseparably attached thereto. In the counter-bore 9, of the tread 5, I may in some structures, place a sheet metal receptacle 17, for the cushion 8. This reinforces the strength of the tread 5, bounding the orifiee 7, and provides a larger surface 18, to connect the tread 5 to the overlying portion 6 of the shoe, which may be done, as by moansof tacks or screws 19.. The metallic cup-shaped receptacle 17 furthermore provides a relatively air-tight wall for the open space 11; when the inner surfaces of'the cushion are pressed into contact therewith.

Vvhcn the inserts are placed in the bearing surface of the sole. of a shoe, their yielding effect, due to the pressure of the wearer compensates, to a large extent, for the lack of bending, in rigidly stiff soles, and when they are used in duce the shocks normally imparted to the wearer by more rigid heels, and prevent slipping, thereby rendering Walking much more comfortable and accompanied by less danger.

Having claim is v In combination With a shoe tread having a depression extending part Way through the tread and having an annular enlargement near the bottom of the depression; a resilient plug having a body part fitting in described my invention, what I the heel of a shoe they rethe body part of the depression and an annular flange to be received by said annular enlargement; said body part of the plug reduced in diameter near said flange to provide an annular space for its diametric'expansion.

In testimony whereof I hereunto set my hand in the presence of two subscribing Wit-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2931110 *Feb 26, 1957Apr 5, 1960Pietrocola RobertoSole and heel unit for shoes and the like
US3327412 *Feb 25, 1965Jun 27, 1967Weinbrenner Shoe CorpOutsoles having calks and method of manufacturing the same
US4237625 *Sep 18, 1978Dec 9, 1980Cole George SThrust producing shoe sole and heel
US4358902 *Apr 2, 1980Nov 16, 1982Cole George SThrust producing shoe sole and heel
US4577417 *Apr 27, 1984Mar 25, 1986Energaire CorporationSole-and-heel structure having premolded bulges
US4878300 *Jul 15, 1988Nov 7, 1989Tretorn AbAthletic shoe
US5343639 *Oct 18, 1993Sep 6, 1994Nike, Inc.Shoe with an improved midsole
US5353523 *Oct 13, 1993Oct 11, 1994Nike, Inc.Shoe with an improved midsole
US5617653 *Apr 4, 1995Apr 8, 1997Andrew S. WalkerBreak-away cleat assembly for athletic shoe
US5638615 *Oct 26, 1995Jun 17, 1997Korsen; David L.Shoe spike apparatus
US5743029 *Sep 13, 1996Apr 28, 1998Walker; Andrew S.Break-away cleat assembly for athletic shoes
US5896682 *Mar 30, 1998Apr 27, 1999Gnan-Jang Plastics Co., Ltd.Shock-absorbing rib and sole mounting arrangement
US5956871 *Jun 17, 1997Sep 28, 1999Korsen; David L.Shoe spike apparatus
US6487796Jan 2, 2001Dec 3, 2002Nike, Inc.Footwear with lateral stabilizing sole
US6880267Jan 28, 2004Apr 19, 2005Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US6898870Mar 20, 2002May 31, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole having support elements with compressible apertures
US6964120Nov 2, 2001Nov 15, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear midsole with compressible element in lateral heel area
US6968636Apr 26, 2004Nov 29, 2005Nike, Inc.Footwear sole with a stiffness adjustment mechanism
US7082698Jan 8, 2003Aug 1, 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US7401418Aug 17, 2005Jul 22, 2008Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US7493708Feb 18, 2005Feb 24, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with plate dividing a support column
US7533477Oct 3, 2005May 19, 2009Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7748141May 18, 2006Jul 6, 2010Nike, IncArticle of footwear with support assemblies having elastomeric support columns
US7774955Apr 17, 2009Aug 17, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7779558Jul 4, 2005Aug 24, 2010Asics CorporationShock absorbing device for shoe sole
US7810256Apr 17, 2009Oct 12, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US7841105Dec 7, 2009Nov 30, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US8302234Apr 17, 2009Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8302328Jun 29, 2010Nov 6, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8312643Sep 28, 2010Nov 20, 2012Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US8656608Sep 13, 2012Feb 25, 2014Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with a sole structure having fluid-filled support elements
US20040128860 *Jan 8, 2003Jul 8, 2004Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US20040181969 *Jan 28, 2004Sep 23, 2004Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having a sole structure with adjustable characteristics
US20040221483 *Nov 2, 2001Nov 11, 2004Mark CartierFootwear midsole with compressible element in lateral heel area
US20060185191 *Feb 18, 2005Aug 24, 2006Nike, Inc.Article of footwear with plate dividing a support column
US20070039204 *Aug 17, 2005Feb 22, 2007Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US20070266592 *May 18, 2006Nov 22, 2007Smith Steven FArticle of Footwear with Support Assemblies having Elastomeric Support Columns
US20080034615 *Jul 4, 2005Feb 14, 2008Asics CorporationShock Absorbing Device For Shoe Sole
US20090199431 *Apr 17, 2009Aug 13, 2009Nike, Inc.Article Of Footwear With A Sole Structure Having Bluid-Filled Support Elements
US20100077636 *Dec 7, 2009Apr 1, 2010Nike, Inc.Article of footwear having midsole with support pillars and method of manufacturing same
US20110067263 *Nov 29, 2010Mar 24, 2011Nike, Inc.Article of Footwear Having Midsole with Support Pillars and Method of Manufacturing Same
USRE34102 *May 14, 1991Oct 20, 1992Energaire CorporationThrust producing shoe sole and heel
EP2380451A1 *Apr 20, 2011Oct 26, 2011A.C. Studio S.n.c. di Armando Cietto & C.Shoe sole with improved muscular unconscious body response
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/59.00A, D02/967, 36/35.00B
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/223
European ClassificationA43B13/22B