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Publication numberUS1283326 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 29, 1918
Filing dateJun 3, 1918
Priority dateJun 3, 1918
Publication numberUS 1283326 A, US 1283326A, US-A-1283326, US1283326 A, US1283326A
InventorsHorst Schreck
Original AssigneeHorst Schreck
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dairy sunning-rack.
US 1283326 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. SCHRECK.

DAIRY sumvmc RACK.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE 3.1918- 1,283,326.. Patented Oct. 29, 1918.

INVENTOR ATTORNEY carrots.

HORST SGHBECK, OF YAIBHANK, NEWYORK.

DAIRY SUNNING-BACK.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented (bet. as, rare.

Application filed June 3, 1918. Serial No. 288,004.

To all whom, it may concern:

Be it known that I, HORST SOHRECK, a citizen of the United States, residing at Yaphank, in the county of Suflolk and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Dairy Sunning- Racks, of which the following is a specification. 7

This'invention relates to driers, and more especially to racks and stands; and the object of the same is to produce an improved sanitary rack by means of which the dairyman can dry his pails, cans, and other receptacles and implements in the sun. I have taken into consideration the depth of the ordinary milk can, and realize that in order to have sunlight fall into it, the same must be stood at an angle which depends to an extent on the time of year and the elevation of the sun above the horizon. I consider galvanized iron tubing and netting the best for use in devices of this character because it is not subject to the weather and may be cleansed by pouring boiling water on it. The proportions and details other than herein below given, are unessential. Reference is made to the following specification and to the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 is a side elevation of this rack.

Fig. 2 a section thereof, on line 22 of Fi 1, and v ig. 3 an enlarged sectional detail on line 33 of Fig. 1.

With the combined'object of permitting adjustment in the top of this rack to a nicety, while also avoiding complication, I render the legs longitudinally telescopic on oblique lines. It is of course old to adjust legs longitudinally, either within their length or at their ends, but if the adjustment occurs where the leg joins the body of the rack there is a certain element of weakness which I seek to avoid. Furthermore, the fact that the top will at times be tilted to a considerable extent requires the inclusion of a railing around the same so that the buckets and cans will not fall off, especially if there should be quite a wind blowing.

Coming now to the details of the present invention, I provide a frame consisting of side bars or rails 1 and 2 connected b a rear cross bar 3 and another cross bar 4 ]l1St in front of it and connected at their front ends by a cross bar 5 indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 1, there being appropriate pipecouplings at all points of connection between these elements or members and those yet to be described. Within this frame is suspended a top 6 which may well consist of w1re netting to support pails as indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 1, whereas cans may be supported at the rear portion of the frame on the cross bar 4. Extending practically around three sides of said frame and above the same is another frame or guard railing consisting of side bars 7 connected at their forward ends by a front cross bar 8 shown only in dotted lines in Fig. 1 and standmg practically above the cross bar 5, its ends also being connected therewith by uprights 9; and within this guard railing the pails and other utensils are held where they rest upon the top 6. Attention is invited to the fact that the, guard railing does not and need not extend rearward over the cross bar 4; which supports the cans and other taller utensils. The support for this structure comprises a pair of rear legs 10 perpendicular to the frame and a pair of front legs which are oblique. The rear legs are made in upper members and lower members 11 which telescope as indicated, and are provided with openings 12 and 13 for holding them when they have been telescoped. These legs rise past and inside the side bars of the main frame are connected at l lwith the side bars 7 of the railing, rise above these points of connection, and are connected at their upper ends at 15 with a topbar 16 extending entirely across the device, connecting'the legs 10 and serving as a rest for the cans. This top bar 16 may have hooks 17 and the front bar 8 may have hooks 18 on which are hung can covers and tops, and other small articles as described below.

A second pair of legs comprises upper members '20 and lower members 21 telescoping into each other and having holes 22 and pins 23 for holding them after they are adjusted,-their upper members being connected as at 24 with the side rails 1 and 2 and at 25 with the side rails 7 of the railing, beyond which they rise to the point 26 where they are connected with the extremities of the bar 16. Just below the points of connection 26 the oblique legs pass through couplings 27 to which are attached struts 28, the lower ends of which are attached to couplings 29 which connect the rear ends of {)he side bars 1 and 2 with the rear cross bar 3, and lie against Thus is built up a skeleton rack made entirely of galvanized iron tubing and con plings, and most of the latter are of a character which can be bought in the open market. The top plate (if I may call it such) is made of wire fabric as seen at 6, drawn taut and connected with the frame in any way with suflicient strength to permit it to support buckets, pails P, cans of moderate size and other dairy receptacles and 1m-' plements, while the cated at C preferably rest on the cross bar 4: and if large enough rest also on the cross the top bar 16 as seen in Fig. 1. The parts being set up tight and the legs adjusted to the proper degree, when the feet 30 rest on the ground the top 1 will stand inclined, and the inclination should be such that the rays of the sun at about noon time will shine directly into the receptacles or utensils such as the cans C. This is accomplished by adjusting the length of the two pair of legs. Obyiously in the summer time the sun is more nearly over head and the table top 6 should be more nearly level whereas in-the winter time the sunis nearer the horizon at noon and the table top should incline to a great degree so that the axis of each can C which is of considerable depth Will be disposed at a greater inclination than in the summer time. It may be possible to effect this adjustment in one pair of legs, and I claim the privilege of doing so and of manufacturing the device in that manner; but I have shown both pair of legs as adjustable so that a much wider degree of adjustment can be secured than if but one pair could be lengthened and shortened. While not wishing to limit myself to the proportions of parts,l would say that all parts of the frame should stand so high from the I ground that no utensil supported thereby will be spatteredwhen it rains and the impact of large rain drops throws up mud from the ground.

The foregoing description and the drawings have reference to what may be considered the preferred, or approved, form of my invention. It is to be understood that I may make such changes in construction and arrangement and combination of parts, materials, dimensions, et cetera, as may prove expedient and fall within the scope of the appended claims.

Having "thus fully described my invention, What Iclaim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is za 1. In a sunning rack, the combination with a frame having a screen top therein, legs near two corners of the frame and perpenof the frame and secured thereto, for the purpose set forth.

2. In a sunning rack, the combination with larger milk cans indi-' Laeaeac a frame having a screen top therein, a pair of legs near two corners of the frameand perpendicular thereto, oblique legs extending from the perpendicular legs past the sides of the frame and beyond its op osite corners, one pair of legs being made of two members telescopically mounted on each other, means for holding the members position, and feet on the lower members.

3. A dairy sunning rack comprising a frame, a wire mesh top therein, legs secur at their upper ends to the frame, means for adjusting the length of one pair of legs for setting the frame in a tilted position, and a railing carried by and above saidframe, for the purpose set forth.

4. A' dairy sunnmg rack comprising a.

frame, a top therein, a railing around the frame, a pair of legs near the rear end of the frame and perpendicular thereto, another pair of legs connected with the side of the frame and oblique thereto, and means for adjusting the lengths of all legs.

5. A dairy sunning rack comprising a frame, a top therein, legs for supporting the frame, a railing around substantially three sides of the frame, and a top bar across the frame at a higher level than the railing, for the purpose set forth.

6. A dairy sunning rack comprising a frame, a cross bar Within the rear portion thereof, a screen top within the frame forward of said cross bar, a railing around the frame excepting that ortion having said cross bar, legs perpen icular to the frame and supporting it .and the railing at points forward of said cross bar, a top bar connecting said legs above the railing, and means for supporting the front end of the frame at adjustable heights.

7. A dairy sunning rack comprising a frame, a cross bar'withinthe. rear portion thereof, a screen top within the frame for- Y ward of said cross bar, a railing around the frame excepting that portion having said oblique to the frame for supporting its forward portion, and means for adjusting the lengths of certain of said legs.

8. A dairy sunning rack comprising a frame, a cross bar within the rear portion thereof, a screen top within the frame forward of said cross bar, a railing around the frame excepting that portion having said cross bar, legs perpendicular to the fr me and supporting it and the railing at points forward of said cross bar, a top bar connecting said legs above the railing, other legs in their adjusted oblique to the frame for supporting its forward portion, each leg being made in two 'members whereof one telescopes into the other, said members being provided with perfor the purpose set forth.

9. In a sunning rack of the class described, the combination with a rectangular frame, a screen bottom across its forward portion, a cross bar within its rearward portion, and a railing around its sides and across its front ends entirely forward of said cross bar; of rear legs perpendicular to said frame and connected to the rear end of said railing and extending above the same, a top bar connecting their upper ends, oblique legs leading from said top bar forward and downward and connected with the railing and the side bars of the frame, and means ,for adjusting all legs.

10; In a sunning rack of the class described, the combination with a rectangular frame, a screen bottom across its forward portion,

ward and connected with I a crossbar within its rearward por tion, and a railing around its sides and across its front ends entirely forward of said cross bar; of rear legs perpendicular to said frame and connected to the rear end of said railing and extending above the same, a top bar connecting their upper ends, oblique legs leading from said top bar forward and downthe railing and the side bars of the frame, struts connecting the ends of the rear bar of the frame with said oblique legs, and means for adjusting the lengths of all legs below their lowest points of attachment to said superstructure.

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

HORST SCHRECK. Witnesses:

JULIA L. HANES, PHILIP A. RORTY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2460699 *Dec 2, 1946Feb 1, 1949Ballinger Mills JrClothesline pole
US2503715 *Jan 13, 1948Apr 11, 1950R & E Appliance CompanyLine supporting device
US2614700 *Jun 12, 1946Oct 21, 1952Kjeldsen Jens LauritsRack for milk buckets or like containers
US2620073 *May 16, 1949Dec 2, 1952Meyers Roy LambertMilk can rack
US2682339 *Apr 12, 1951Jun 29, 1954StarlineMilk can rack
US3190688 *Jan 17, 1964Jun 22, 1965Wgw Engineering IncMethod and means for mounting a cab on a tractor
US5344033 *May 28, 1993Sep 6, 1994Richard HermanProduce stand
US7198160 *Jun 30, 2004Apr 3, 2007Aldi Einkauf Gmbh & Co. OhgSales rack
US7607625 *Mar 7, 2006Oct 27, 2009Sallas Industrial Co., Ltd.Host support
US9216679 *May 27, 2012Dec 22, 2015Barnitus A. WongAdjustable footrest
US20050011845 *Jun 30, 2004Jan 20, 2005Peter ErnstSales rack
US20070145221 *Mar 7, 2006Jun 28, 2007Chia-Ming WangHost support
USRE36638 *Jan 7, 1999Apr 4, 2000Herman; Richard J.Multiple configuration produce stand
Classifications
U.S. Classification211/182, 211/175, 211/74, 211/126.1, 211/71.1, 248/146
Cooperative ClassificationF16B12/40, A47B47/027