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Publication numberUS1285129 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 19, 1918
Filing dateMay 26, 1917
Priority dateMay 26, 1917
Publication numberUS 1285129 A, US 1285129A, US-A-1285129, US1285129 A, US1285129A
InventorsGeorge N Goodrich
Original AssigneeGeorge N Goodrich
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multicylinder engine.
US 1285129 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. N. GOODRICH.

MULTICYLINDER ENGINE.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 26. 1911.

1,285,129. Patented'Nov. 19, 1918.

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G. N. GOODRICH.

MULTlCYLINDER ENGINE.

APPLICATION FILED MAY 26. 1917.

Patented Nov. 19, 1918.

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GEORGE N. GOODRICH, 0F DETROIT, MICHIGAN.

MULTICYLINDER ENGINE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Nov. 19,1918.

Application filed May 26, 1917. Serial No. 171,281.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, GEORGE N. GooDRIoH, a citizen of the United States, residing at Detroit, county of Wayne, State of Michigan, haveinvented a certain new and useful Improvement in Multicylinder Engines, and declare the following to be a full, clear, and exact description of the same,'such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it pertains to make and use the same, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, which form a part of this specification.

This invention relates to fuel distribution in multi-cylinder engines, especially engines having two opposed blocks of cylinders, as

for nstance, eight cylinder motors of the V type. In motors of this character where the crankshaft is a four-throw shaft with the throws at the 90 degree points, some of the cylinders do not get the same quantity of fuel mixture as others due to the inertia of the fuel mixture being greater when some of the cylinders are drawing in their charge than others, resulting in an unbalanced relation. This will more fully appear hereinafter.

In the drawings,

Figure 1 is an end elevation of an eight cylinder engine of the V type.

Fig. 2 is a horizontal section of the same.

Figs. 3 and 4 are views of the crankshaft.

Fig. 5 shows a modified form for distributing the fuel mixture.

In an eight-cylinder engine of the V type having a crankshaft of the four throw 90 degree variety such as depicted in Fi s. 3 and 4, it necessarily follows that the ring order is such that there will be immediately successive firings in one bank of cylinders. Of course, there will be also immediately succeeding suctions of fuel in one bank of cylinders. For illustrationthe firing order of the cylinders as shown in Figs. 2 or 5 may be 136-4- 5827 or there are several other possible firing orders. It will be found that in any of these firing orders with a 90 degree four throw crankshaft there are immediately successive firings in one bank of cylinders. For instance, in the firing order just alluded to, 1 and 3 are immediately succeeding firing orders in the upper bank shown in the drawings, While '5 and 8 are immediately succeeding firing orders in the lowerbank shown in the drawings.

In the ordinary eight-cylinder V type engine a four throw 180 degreecrankshaft is employed, and it will be found that by tracing out the firing orders in such a crankshaft they can be made to cross each time from one bank of cylinders to the other, consequently avoiding two immediately successive firing.

orders in a'single bank. The vice of this immediately successive firing order in one bank of cylinders is this: The next cylinder firing in the opposite bank has to pull against substantially double inertia effects where an ordinary manifold is used and that cylinder is really starved.

It is my belief that the reason why this four throw 90 degree crankshaftis notused in eight cylinder motors of the V type is for this very reason, that the manifolding problem has not been properly understood or corrected. The four throw 90 degree crankshaft has a much better running balance than the ordinary four throw 180 degree crankshaft now in use, but such better running balance of the four throw 90 degree shaft is more than-offset by the unequal gas distribution when the ordinary manifolding is used. This unequal gas distribution has caused such a variety of impulses that the running balance of such a 90 degree shaft coupled up to an eight cylinder V type engine with the conventional manifold has been worse than the 180 degree fourthrow shaft so coupled.

I have remedied this condition by employing separate passage-ways from the fuel supply means which'couple up a plurality of cylinders in each bank but which connect cylinders having non-immediately successive firing orders.

This coupling up may be achieved in several ways; for instance, a single manifold may be used such as shown in Fig. 2 with a single carbureter and the partitions'a, a to provide a manifold at each side divided into the two parts at its center. Or separate carbureters may be used, as shown in Fig. 5, and a single manifold to connect a pair of cylinders at one end of one bank with a pair of cylinders at the other end of the other bank. V

It will be found that by this arrangement no two cylinders are connected by the same I manifold passage-way in the same bank having immediately successive firing orders and consequently a cylinder does not have to oppose double inertiaeffects created by a pair of cylinders in the opposite bank.-

In the manifolding shown in Fig. 2 of course two cylinders in one bank succeed each other in firing but they are separated by the partitions. Consequently the lastbne to take in the gases not only pulls the gases from the carbureter and the manitolding connecting the other bank but it also pulls the gases around the partition. Hence when the suction stroke crosses to the opposite bank that cylinder has only to overcome the inertia of the gases traveling toward the opposite bank at one side of the partition (1. What l claim is:

1. The combination with an internal combustion engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the crankshaft, some of the cylinders in a bank having immediately succeeding firing orders, or fuel mixing means, inanitolding leading from the said mixing means to the cylinders and divided into passage-Ways so that the end of a single passage-Way connects only cylinders having a non-immediately successive firing order.

2. The combination with an internal combustion engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the cranlrshaft, each bank including a plurality of cylinders, with some of the cylinders in a hank having immediately succeeding firing orders, of fuel supply means, manifolding reaching both banks of cylinders and arranged and divided so that there are passage- Ways each of which leads to a plurality of cylinders in a bank but only the cylinders in such bank that have non-immediately successive firing orders.

3. The combination with an internal com bustion engine having two banks of cylinders arranged angularly about the cranksaid manifold having a pair of partitions a,

a which divide the manifold at the cent-er into passage-Ways which lead to a plurality" of cylinders in each bank but only the cylinders in such bank that have non-immediately successive firing orders.

In testimony whereof I sign this specification.

enoaen a. eooinnrcn.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2771865 *Oct 1, 1954Nov 27, 1956Gen Motors CorpManifold support structure
US2898898 *Dec 17, 1953Aug 11, 1959Gen Motors CorpEngine
US3039447 *Oct 1, 1958Jun 19, 1962Daimler Benz AgMulti-cylinder internal combustion engine
US3095865 *Dec 9, 1960Jul 2, 1963Gen Motors CorpInter-cylinder combustion control system for an internal combustion engine
US4860709 *Sep 20, 1988Aug 29, 1989Ford Motor CompanyEngine induction system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/54.7, 123/184.32
International ClassificationF02B75/18, F02B75/22
Cooperative ClassificationF02B75/22, F02B2075/1832
European ClassificationF02B75/22