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Publication numberUS1287519 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 10, 1918
Filing dateMar 13, 1915
Priority dateMar 13, 1915
Publication numberUS 1287519 A, US 1287519A, US-A-1287519, US1287519 A, US1287519A
InventorsWilliam I Thomson
Original AssigneeSafety Car Heating & Lighting
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Driving apparatus for car-lighting generators.
US 1287519 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' w. l. THOMSON.

DRIVING APPARATUS FOR CAR LIGHTING GENERATORS.

APPLICATION FILED MAR. 13. I915.

Patented Dec. 10, I918.

2 SHEETSSHEET 1- III 1 1n" W. I. THOMSON. DRIVYIVNG APPARATUS FOR CAR LIGHTING GENERATORS.

APPLICATION FILED MAR. 13. 19'5.

Patented Dec. 10, 1818 2 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

5 nva ntoz WILLIAM I. THOMSON, OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO THE SAFETY OAR HEATING & LIGHTING COMPANY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.

DRIVING APPARATUS. FOR OAR-LIGHTING GENERATORS.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Dec. 10, 1918.

Application filed March 13, 1915. Serial No. 14,207.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, WILLIAM I. THOMSON, a citizen of the United States, and residing at Newark, in the county of Essex and State of New Jersey, have invented a new and Improved Driving Apparatus for Oar-Lighting Generators, of which the following specification is a full disclosure.

This invention relates to driving apparatus for car lighting generators and meth ods of making certain parts thereof.

One of the objects thereof is to provide practical and etlicient apparatus of the above type which will be reliable under conditions of hard, practical use; Other objects are to provide apparatus of the above type of simple, durable and inexpensive construction. Another object is to provide a practical and convenient art for making certain portions of the above apparatus. Other objects will be in part obvious and in part pointed out hereinafter.

The invention accordingly consists in the features of construction, combinations of elements, arrangements of parts, and in the several steps and relation and order of such steps, all as hereinafter pointed out and the scope of the application of which will be indicated in the following claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which is shown one of various possible embodiments of this invention. Figure 1 is a side elevation of a portion of a railway car with driving apparatus mounted thereon, certain parts being broken away in order to show the construction more clearly.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of a generator pulley partially in section along the line BB of Fig. 3.

Fig. 3 is an edge view of this pulley partially in section along the line A-A of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4: is a side elevation of another pulley, certain parts being broken away to show the construction more clearly.

Fig. 5 is a similar view of a portion of this pulley, the parts being shown upon a larger scale. 4

Fig. 6 is a sectional bottom plan taken along the line C-O of Fig. 5.

Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken along the line DD of Fig. 5.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts. throughout the various views of the drawings,

Referring now to Fig. 1 of the drawings, there is diagrammatically indicated at 1 a portion of a railway car body, one end of which is mounted upon the truck 2 running upon the rails S. This truck is of the usual construction and one of its axles 4 is provided with a pulley 5, shown in detail in Figs. 4 to 7 of the drawings.

Mounted upon the floor frame of the body 1, to swing about a shaft 6 in brackets 7, is an electrical generator 8 provided with a pulley 9. This generator is pivotally connected with shaft 6 by means of lugs 10 and is normally retracted or swung away from the truck as by the spring 11 secured to an arm 12 laterally extending from one of the lu s 10.

- Tulleys 9 and 5 are normally substantially in alinement and are connected by the belt 13.

Considering now, the construction of pulley 5, reference is made to Fig. 4: of the drawings in which this device is shown in detail. This pulley is formed in separable parts, preferably two in number, which meet one another to complete the pulley along the lines 11 and the hub portions 15 of which are bolted or clamped one to another as by means of the bolts 16. In this manner, the pulley may be mounted upon a car axle and securely clamped in position.

It has been found that'in apparatus of this general nature, particularly when it is subjected to winter use in northern climates, when the car stops or is laid up for a greater or less time. there is a likelihood of the entire belt becoming frozen into substantially rigid form and thus failing to perform its functions, even though the car be moved and the axle duly turned.

This condition may remain indefinitely in cold weather and render the generating apparatus inoperative.

To do away with this defect in action and attain other advantages. there is provided upon the face of the pulley a frict onal member 17. This member preferably takes the form of a canvas strip which is impregnated with balata.

The method of applying this member is substantially as follows: Holes 18 are first drilled at substantially equal intervals about the face of both sections of the pulley on each side and at the meeting edges of the pulley face, where the sections join, addibeing during this cooling operation firmly held in place. At this stage, holes are formed in the frictional member registering with all of the holes in the pulley face and rivets are passed through these riveting holes and headed, being preferably countersunk in the member 17 as indicated at 19. In this manner there is insured perfect registry of the rivet holes land the frictional member is rigidly held in place, both mechanically, by the rivets and the flanges 20, as well as adhesively, due to the action of the balata. The frictional member may then be severed along the lines of junction of the pulley sections, although if desired it may be placed in position in separate sections corresponding to the face of each pulley section. The member placed thus mountedvirtually forms a portion of the pulley itself and maintains its position under the hardest conditions of use.

As there is a tendency of the icy belt to slip to an undesirable extent upon the generator pulley 8, the latter device is formed as indicated in Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawings. The pulley face 21 is bored with holes 22 about the circumference at each side of the pulley and with additional holes 23 extending across the pulley in two adjacent lines, substantially at the points 24 and 25.

Upon the pulley face being cleaned, a frictional strip 26 impregnated with balata is wound tightly about the pulley, preferably in a plurality of layers, and ending as at 27 in such form that the resultant pulley face is substantially even. It will be seen that one end of the strip 26, the inner end, comes opposite the line of rivets 24, whereas the outer end comes opposite the point 25. With the parts in this position, holes registering with the various holes in the pulley face are bored throughout all thicknesses of the member 26 and counter-sunk rivets 28 inserted and secured in place. The frictional member is then bound in position tightly against the pulley face, and the pulley heated and permitted to cool in this position. In this manner, the impregnated strip adheres not only to the pulley face but to itself from one layer to another, and there is provided a frictional surfacing of considerable depth which is reliably held in place.

It is to be noted that the frictional members upon both pulleys'are of substantially heat-insulating constituents, and it may be noted that the term heat insulating is used as descriptive of a substance which conducts heat with difficulty.

Considering now the action of this apparatus, if a car is set in motion after being exposed to a severe northern climate, with the belt substantially in the condition hereinbefore described, the pulley 5, being rotated with great force, first breaks lose from the belt even though the latter be frozen in position. Its outer frictional surface is now rotated with respect to the inner side of the adjacent portion of the belt and this speed of rotation reaches a high value even with moderate train speeds, as its peripheral speed is often over half that of the linear rate of travel of the car.

The friction due to this relative movement quickly generates a considerable amount of heat as distinguished from the effect of the smooth face of an ordinary steel pulley which is itself cold and which quickly withdraws and radiates any insignificant amount of heat which may be evolved. Here, however, there is not only a very substantial amount of heat generated but, due to the heat-insulating character of the frictional member, this is not transmitted readily to the pulley and thus dissipated but is held at this point of generation. This heat quickly thaws the adjacent portions of the belt, and the high rotative tendency upon the belt,

'due to the large coefficient of friction of member 17, causes the former to creep in the direction of rotation and by small gradations expose its entire length to the effect of the heat. In this manner the apparatus is quickly placed in full operative condition, the formation'of the generator pulley preventing slipping at that point even though the belt still be somewhat icy.

It will thus be seen that there is provided simple and reliable apparatus in which the objects of this invention are achieved and which not only eliminates certain important defects in running but is otherwise highly advantageous.

As many changes might be made in the above arrangement, and as many apparently different embodiments 'might be made 0 this invention without departing from the scope thereof, it is intended that all features herein described or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having "thus revealed this invention, I claim as new and desire to secure the following combinations of elements, or equivalents thereof, by Letters Patent of the United States 1. In car-axle-driven electrical apparatus, in combination with the car axle, a pulley upon the car axle, a generator positioned beneath the car, a pulley upon said generator, a belt connecting said pulleys, and

means, adapted to heat the belt upon said first pulley.

2. In car-axle-driven electrical apparatus, in combination with the car axle, a pulley upon the car axle, a generator positioned beneath the car, a pulley upon said generator,- a belt connecting said pulleys, and heat-generating means upon said first pulley against which said belt rests.

3. In car-axle-driven electrical apparatus, in combination with the car axle, a pulley upon the car axle, a generator positioned beneath the car, a pulley upon said generator, a belt connecting said pulleys, and means adapted to prevent conduction toward said pulley of heat generated by relative movement of said pulley and the belt resting thereon.

4. In car-axle-driven electrical apparatus, in combination with the car axle, a pulley upon the car axle, a generator positioned beneath the car, a pulley upon said generator,

a belt connecting said pulleys, and frictional means of heat insulating material upon said first pulley against which said belt rests.

5. In car-axle-driven electrical apparatus, vin combination with the car axle, a pulley upon the car axle, a generator positioned beneath the car, a pulley upon said generator, a belt connectmg said pulleys, and a member of heat-insulating frictional mate'- rial positioned upon the face of one of said pulleys and securedthereto.

means extending about the face of said pulley and riveted thereon.

8. In car-axle-driven electrical apparatus, in combination with the car axle, a flanged pulley formed in a plurality of sections,

means adapted to secure said sections in assembled relation upon the car axle, and heat-generating means secured to the pulley face of each of said sections independently of the flanges. of said pulley.

9. In car-axle-driven electrical apparatus, in combination with the car axle, a pulley secured upon said axle, and heat-generating means extending about the face of said pulley and adhesively secured thereto and riveted thereto at spaced points throughout its edges.

In witness whereof, I hereunto subscribe my name, as attested by the two subscribing witnesses.

WILLIAM I. THOMSON.

Witnesses:

FRANK BERKES, H. K. WILLIAMS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3946618 *Oct 9, 1973Mar 30, 1976Superior Iron Works & Supply Company, Inc.Bull wheel
Classifications
U.S. Classification105/101, 474/177
Cooperative ClassificationB61D43/00