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Publication numberUS1288132 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 17, 1918
Filing dateMay 1, 1918
Priority dateMay 1, 1918
Publication numberUS 1288132 A, US 1288132A, US-A-1288132, US1288132 A, US1288132A
InventorsPeter J Nagle
Original AssigneeCedaroid Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cardboard receptacle and method of forming the same.
US 1288132 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P. J. NAGLE. CARDBOARD RECEPTAC-LE-AND METHOD 'OF FORMING THE SAME.

AY 1- 191B.

' APPLICATION FILED M 1,288,132. Patented Dec. 17,1918.

PETER J'. NAGLE, OF ROCHESTER, NEW YORK,

ASSIGN OR TO CEDAROID 00. IN (3., OF

ROCHESTER, NEW YORK, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

CARDBOARD RECEPTAGLE AND METHOD FORMING THE SAME.

Application filed May 1, 1918.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, PETER J. NAonn, a citizen of the United States, and resident of Rochester, in the county of Monroe and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Cardboard Receptacles and Methods of Forming the Same, of which-the following is a specification. Y

The present invention relatesto cardboard receptacles and to the method of forming the same. An object of this invention is to provide for making a receptacle from thick cardboard stock in which the corner between two walls formed from a single piece of stock will be strong and durable. Another object of the invention is to provide a crease or score in cardboard stock which will permit the utilization of two rotary knives without any clogging action.

To these and other ends, the invention consists of certain parts and combinations of parts, all of which will be hereinafter described, the novel features being pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a portion of a bottom, a front, and a rear wall of a receptacle scored or creased in accordance with this invention;

Fig. 2 shows a vertical section through a portion of a sheet of cardboard with two rotary cutters cooperating therewith;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional view showing the cardboard after it has been scored or creased in accordance with this invention; and

Fig. 4 is an enlarged sectional view showing two walls of the receptacle bent at right angles to close the two grooves, compress the stock between the grooves, and break the stock on its opposite side between the grooves.

At the present time it is customary, when receptacles are formed from thick cardboard, to provide in one face of the cardboard a V-shaped groove or score, preferabl by two fixed knives arranged at angles to each other and past which the material is caused to travel. It has also been suggested to form these grooves by means of two rotary knives whose axes are at slight angles to each other. When the stationary knives are Specification of Letters Patent.

- stock Patented Dec. 1'7, 1918. Serial No. 231,928.

used such knives must be sharpened very frequently,

and when the rotary knives are used there is a great tendency for clogging action due to the arrangement of the rotary knives. In both instances, when the stock 1s bent to bring the two portions on opposite sides of the groove at right angles to each other and to close said groove, the stock breaks directly opposite the apex of the groove, so that only a small amount of stock forms a connection between the two walls. It is the purpose of this invention to score or crease the board so that the stock, when breaking on the opposite side of the crease or score, will still have sufficient body between the two walls to provide a firm connection. It has been found also that, when the stock-is scored or creased in accordance with this invention, it is rotary knives without the clogging action.

eferring more particularly to the drawmgs, 1 indicates the bottom wall of the receptacle and 2 the side walls, all of which are formed from a single piece of stock, the Walls in the drawings lying in the same plane. On opposite sides'of the bottom wall 1 the stock is formed with two grooves 3 which preferably have converging walls and lie inlose proximity to each other with a rib or portion 4 between them, this rib being below the plane of the grooved face of the so that the stock between the grooves is thinner than the portions on the outer sides of the grooves.

. The grooves may be formed by two beveled cutters 5 journaled on arms 6 which depend from blocks secured to the usual scoring machine. The opposed faces of the two cutters 5 are at right angles to the common axes of the cutters, while the oppossible to use two production of any posite face 8 of each cutter is at a slight angle to said axis. The stock is caused to travel past the cutters, and in doing so the V grooves 3 are cut in the stock and at the same time a thin piece of the stock between thevtwo grooves is peeled off, due to the laminated structure of the cardboard, thus reducing the thickness of the material be tween the grooves 3 in the manner shown in Fig. 3

.After the groove is formed the side wall 2 isbent at right angles to the bottom wall 1, as shown in Fig. 4, thus closing the grooves 3 and at the same time compressing the rib formed between the grooves in the manner shown at 4: in Fig. 4, while breaking or splitting the stock, as shown at 9 in Fig. 4, this break or split occurring be tween the grooves 3, so that the break or split is out of line with the apexes of the bottoms of the grooves 3, and in this way a greater amount of stock is secured in the corner between the walls 1 and 2.

To the end that the material shall break on a straight line, the under side of the cardboard may be provided with a surface score as at 10, Fig. 3, which may be formed in the scoring machine by a rotary cutter operating on the under side of the board.

From the foregoing it will be seen that, according to this invention, it is possible to obtain a receptacle made from thick cardboard and having two angularly arranged walls formed from a single piece of stock and connected. by a co ner-formed on one face of the stock by two adjacent closed grooves with the stock between the grooves compressed, and the opposite side of the stock broken between the grooves. This result is obtained by scoring or cutting two grooves having converging walls and situated in close proximity to each other, bending the stock to close the grooves, and to compress the stock between the grooves,

while at the same time breaking the opposite face or side of the stock between the grooves.

What I claim as my invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent is 1. A sheet of cardboard for forming receptacles having two grooves with converging walls situated in close proximity on one side ofthe stock, the material between the grooves being thinner than that on opposite sides of the grooves, said sheet also memes having a groove on the opposite side of the the stock on the opposite side between the grooves.

4. The method of forming receptacles from cardboard which consists in simultaneously providing two adjacent grooves in the stock and removing part of the material between the grooves; and then bending the stock in a direction to close the grooves, to compress the stock between the grooves and to break the stock on the opposite side between the grooves.

5. The method of forming receptacles from cardboard which consists in providing in one face of the stock two adjacent grooves and in the opposite face a single groove between the two grooves, and bending the stock to close the two grooves and to break the stock at the single groove.

6. The method of .forming receptacles from cardboard which consists in providing in one face of the stock two adjacent grooves, thinning the stock between the grooves, providing in the opposite face of the stock a groove between the two grooves, and bending the compress the stock between the grooves and break the stock at the single groove.

PETER J. NAGLE.

of forming receptacles stock to close the two grooves, to

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2683928 *Sep 12, 1950Jul 20, 1954Gen Motors CorpMethod of corrugating tubing
US2932439 *Jul 9, 1956Apr 12, 1960Earl L SparlingRigid cardboard gift boxes
US3199763 *Jun 12, 1963Aug 10, 1965Tri Wall Containers IncCorrugated cartons having crushrelieved flaps
US3654842 *Oct 13, 1969Apr 11, 1972Int Paper CoMethod of making side seam sealed container
US3786732 *Feb 16, 1972Jan 22, 1974Westvaco CorpCutting and scoring die
US4078715 *Apr 15, 1974Mar 14, 1978Ab ZiristorPacking container
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US4664257 *Apr 23, 1981May 12, 1987Kenova AbMethod and capsule for storing and mixing the two co-operative basic materials of dental amalgam and method in manufacturing the capsule
US4693413 *Nov 20, 1986Sep 15, 1987International Paper CompanyLaminated bulk bin corner structure
US4733519 *Sep 24, 1986Mar 29, 1988Xidex CorporationMethod and system for forming floppy disk envelopes
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Classifications
U.S. Classification229/100, 15/41.1, 229/931, 83/880, 29/DIG.330, 493/59, 281/41
Cooperative ClassificationY10S29/033, Y10S229/931, B65D5/4266