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Publication numberUS1292184 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 21, 1919
Filing dateMay 7, 1917
Priority dateMay 7, 1917
Publication numberUS 1292184 A, US 1292184A, US-A-1292184, US1292184 A, US1292184A
InventorsHenry W Wells
Original AssigneeHenry W Wells
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game-cards.
US 1292184 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H W. WELLS.

GAME CARDS.

APPLICATION FILED MAYI. um.

11,292,184. Patented Jan. 21,1919.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

DISTRICT OF'COLUM BIA THE FEDERAL DISTRICT OF TH E UNITED STATES CONTAINING THE NATIONAL CAPITOL. 2-

FIXED A5 SEAT OF UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT IN I790 BY AN ACT OF cowsazss FORMED OUTOF WASHINGTON COUNTY MD- AREA en SQUARE MILES POPULATION .33l,ooo

H-WIl eZZa H. W. WELLS.

GAME CARDS.

APPLLCATIQN FILED MAY 1. 191-1.

Patented Jan. 21,1919.

3 SHEETSSHEET 2 6 9 m a l N WNWM UOEIIOT AIR-TEAMS WAWTER Wom m W. mscmB R OFWL wwfwm .TQIRWTM M u mmm A M mAw W F ANP w 5 wm m .IM 1BR F wz m UNEHE u AORNT N MMU .uQOMMW B F C RTWFOLIB AWQONOM .TZRWWA nwm R Ammmm A N A W F] l J 6 o OE MHWW E M 1mm K E52 T m mm AMUWMAW U S Z 60 CL 0 C R o o m A Dm-O .E l A TABLAM %m m MIIAANW N r k COL DEL. FL A.

ONE OF THE ORIGINAL 1a STATES AREA 4.8% SQUARE MILES NUMBER 0FcouNnEe, a

POPULATION OF STATE |,l|'l,'766 CAPITOLMARTFORD mummguumas STATE CONN. DEL FL 4.

ADMlTTED -"ro UNION I876 AREA l03,6 i5 SQ ARE MILEfi NUMBER OF OUNTIE6, 57

POPULATION orsmrsflsgozu. CAPITOL, DENVER. N ICK NAME, CENTENNIAL sTAT A A. ARK. CALIF.

ADMITTED T0 UNION l9l2 AREA 5,0206QUARE MILES NUMBER OF COUNTIESJE POPULATION orsrnaaoqm CAP|TOL,PHOEN|X N N KNAME H. W. WEMS.

GAME CARDS.

APPLLCATION man MAY 1. i917.

Patented Jan. 21,1919,

a SHEETS-SHEET sI 5 COL.CONN- F'LA- w COL. corm. DEL. 1 Q IDAHO-ILL. m0. ONEOFiTHEORKII M-IS-STATEG ADMTTEDTO UNION [8H5 V NEOFTHEORIGINALIQSTATE AREA 9,05 6QUARE MILES AREA .mess squnne MILES AREA 69,7 16 so /ms muss NUMBER OF COUNTHES', 6 NUMBER OF counTlEsmfw NUMBER OF commas, I67 POPULATION OF STATE 202,622 PCPULAT'DN OF STATE 762,6; popumnom OFSTATE 2,6 9, 12:

CAPITOL, DOVER. CAPITOLJALLAHASSEE. CAPITOL, ATLANTA. NICKNAMLBWE HEN sTATE- NICKNAME, FLQWER SFATE. MIC/(MAME. CHM/ ER \STATE 1 v P P P 3 GA. n mo. 1 C GA. \DAHO. m0. GA. IDAHO. ILL. ADMITTED TO UNION, I890 ADM'TTED T UNI N, P8 ADMI TED TOUN ON 8% A, swa Q ARE MLE AREA 66,650 sou/m: MIL-E AREA 36,950 squARE Mulls NUMBER OF COUNT\E5, 2| NUMBER OF COUNT/6,102 NUMBER OF COUNTIES, S3. POPULATION 0F sTATE,a25, 59u pommnou oreraraqaqssi- POPULATION 0F .sTATsz'loqsfle CAPITOL I BOISE CAPlTOL,SPfl/M$F/LD CAP\TOL.,INDIANAPOLI6 N KNAME, GEM OFTHEMWNTAINS- NICHNAME H0O-5IER S ATE- of the District HENRY W. WELLS, OF VAN NUYS, CALIFORNIA.

GAME-CARDS.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Jan. 21, 1919.

Application filed May 7, 1917. Serial N 0. 166,957.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, HENRY W. WELLS, a citizen of the United States, residing at Van Nuys, in the county of Los Angeles and State of California, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Game- Cards, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to game devices and has as its object to provide a pack of playing cards with which interesting and instructive games may be played.

More specifically, the invention aims to provide a pack of playing cards so arranged that in the playing of games with said pack the players will become familiar with data concerning the States of the United States and the District of Columbia, such, for example, the State boundaries, population, etc.

The invention also contemplates, as a novel feature in game devices of this class, j

the provision upon the reverse face of each card of a symbol, design, or the like, such, for example, as a representation of the State seal, to indicate to the players other than the player holding the said card, the character of the card.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a hand of the cards, the view illustrating the reverse faces of the cards comprising the hand;

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the obverse face of that card of the deck known trict card;

Figs. 3, 4, 5 and 6 are plan views of the cards of one book;

Figs. 7, 8, 9 and 10 are plan views of the cards of another book;

Figs. 11, 12, 13 and 14 are plan views of the cards comprising a third book.

Each card of the deck with the exception card represents some one State of the Union and the forty-eight State cards are divided into twelve books each comprising four cards, the District card making the forty-ninth or odd card. The drawings illustrate three books of the cards and the arrangement of the remaining books will be understood therefrom, and inasmuch as the Disas the principle involved is the same in each book it is thought that a description of the cards comprising the first This particular book is illustrated in Figs.

3, 4, 5 and 6 of the drawings, and in the book will suffice.

2. While these colors are preferred it will be understood that the said number 1 may be printed in other colors if desired so long as each card bears a different color. At this point it may be stated that the cards comprising the second book, which cards are illustrated in Figs. 7, 8, 9 and 10 of the drawings, bear the number 2 printed in correspondingly different colors and that the cards of the other books bearing-numbers corresponding=to the number of the book; thus the cards comprising thetwelfth .book will each bear the number 12. A.rectangular border 3 is also printed upon the obverse face of each card and upon the said face of each card above the border'3 there are printed in full or in an abbreviated form, the names of the State cards required to complete that particular book. For example, the card shown in Fig. 3 of the drawings represents the State of California and inasmuch as the book embraces the State cards, California, Alabama, Arkansas and Arizona, the said card shown in Fig. 3 will bear the State names, Alabama, Arizona and Arkansas, as indicated by the numeral 4, these three State cards in combination with the card shown in Fig. 3, or, in other words, the card representing the State of California comprising the first book. In like manner the card shown in Fig. 4, which card represents the State of Alabama, will bear at its top the State names, Arkansas, Arizona and California. Within the space defined by the border 3 near the top of the card there is printed, as indicated by the numeral 5, certain data relating to the State represented by that particular card and in the present instance this data consists of the date of admittance of the State to the Union, the area of the State, the number of counties, the population, the capital, and the State nickname. Of course, this data may disclose other facts and may be more or less comprehensive as desired. Within the space defined by the border 3 below the data indicated by the numeral 5, there is printed a map embracing the State represented by the card and its bounding States or, bodies of water. For example, in the instance of the card shown in Fig. 3, the map embraces the State of California represented by said card, as indicated by the numeral 6, and also the bounding States of Oregon, Nevada and Arizona as also lower California and the Pacific Ocean. In the instance of each card, the map of the State which that card represents is printed in some distinctive color, as clearly shown in the several figures of the drawings so that the player may readily identify the cards which he holds.

,Upon the reverse face of each card, which face is indicated by the numeral 7 and is, in other words, the space which is exposed to the view of the players other than the player holding that particular card in his hand, there is printed, as indicated by the numeral 8, a map of the United States, the several States being indicated by numbers corresponding to the numbers borne by the respective State cards of the deck. For example, in the said map 8, the States California, Alabama, Arkansas and Arizona will each be designated by the number 1 and this number in each instance will be printed in a color corresponding to the color in which it is printed upon the respective State card.

In other words, upon the said map 8 the States in the order mentioned will be designated by the number 1 printed respectively in red, blue, black and yellow. There is also printed upon the said reverse face of each State card, a representation of the great seal of the United States, as indicated by the numeral 9 and also a representation of the great seal of the State represented by said card, as indicated by the numeral 10. These representations of the United States andState seals are respectively located in the upper right and upper left hand corners of the said face of each card so that when the cards are held in the hand in the ordi nary manner the representations of the State seals upon all of the cards will be exposed in view of the players other than the player holding the hand. Thus eachplayer, if he is familiar with the seals of the States of the Union, will be apprised of the State cards held by each of his opponents.

The reverse face of the card representing the District of Columbia, of course, bears the seal of the District of Columbia in the upper left hand corner of said face. The obverse face of the card representing the District of Columbia bears data concerning the District and corresponding ,to the data 5 upon the State cards and below this data the said face of the card bears a representation of the United States Capitolp In the upper left hand corner there is printed upon the said face of the card a representation of a star, as indicated by the numeral 11.

There are several games which may be played with the cards embodying the present invention and following are the rules for playing one of such games.

Shuflie cards well and deal to the left one card at a time until each player has five cards (players will let their cards remain on table until dealer is through dealing) and lay the surplus pack face downward in the center of table. The player to the left of dealer then starts the play by calling (to the left one player at a time) from each one or the other players a card giving number desired (not more than one card from each player at one play). If the player called upon holds a card of the number called for, he will ask the caller what State that card represents. If the caller answers correctly the player will surrender card to caller, and draw one from the surplus pack to replace the one surrendered, but if the player called upon does not hold a card of the number called for, or caller does not answer correctly he will say not here and caller calls on next player. If the caller fails to get a card in the call and has no cards he wishes to hold for the count at the end of his play it is a blank play and the play passes on, but if he has a pair or book he wishes to hold for the count he lays them onthe table face up, these cards are called held for the count and cannot be called away from him. He then draws enough cards from the deck to give him five cards in his hand and the play passes on.

The players will watch closely the deal and cards drawn from the surplus deck after the deal. The player, excepting the dealer, first seeing the District card and calling District can claim the District privilege. The dealer stops the deal, places the District card back in the deck shuflles the cards and then continues the deal. If two or more players see and call District at the same time the card is placed back in the deck and there is no privilege allowed. The dealer is allowed one privilege for dealing and does not call District in the deal, but if the card comes to him in the deal and is not noticed by other players until after he picks it up it gives him another privilege also.

To secure a privilege a player (other than the dealer) must call District before the card is picked'up either in the deal or draw.

There is no limit to the cards that can be drawn out of a players hand by a player having the District privilege the player calling can utilize the card to help make a pair or book in that play, and answers questions correctly. After the caller has passed one player he cannot go back to him again. When the District card appears in the draw it is the same as in the deal placed back in the deck and cards shufiled.

If the caller does not recognize a card in another play'ers hand that will help to complete a pair or book'in his hand, he may call any card he wishes or disregard his own hand and draw any card, watching closely and calling a card that will break a pair or book held by that player and trying to pre vent a player from completing a pair or book without calling for it.

A player having three cards of a book at the end of a play and wishing to take chances of getting the fourth, may do so by placing them face downward on the table in front of him and calling the number down, such as fours down or sevens down, etc., which means that he is holding them for the fourth card. No player, but one having the District privilege and holding the fourth card and answering questions, can call these cards from him.

A player may hold as many cards in his hand as he wishes, but never less than five until cards are exhausted. Players must hold cards up so as the backs may be plainly seen by the other players.

Another game which may be played with the cards will now be described.

The rules of the first game govern in this game with the exception of the call and showdown.

Before the players start to play this game they will pick out a certain question to be answered in the call, such as What is the nickname? What is the capital? What State bounds. on the north, south, east or west'?, or any question which may be answered by data on the face of the card.

The player starting a play will call for a card giving the name of the State he desires, and when required will point out that card in the players hand. If the players decide that the question to be asked will be: lVhat is the number of counties?, the player called upon will ask that question, if caller answers correctly the card is surrendered, if not the play is the same as in the first game. The players will select a different question to be asked in the showdown. When a player gets a pair or book he wishes to hold for the count he lays it face up on the table so the rest of the players can see it, and calls, pair or book up.

so long as the State.

If the players select the' question What year admitted to Union?--the play proceeds, as for example:

Four players A, B, C and Dam playing, I

B gets the book of twos and-lays it down face up on the table and calls out book up. A, or the player to the right, picks the book up (A picks out any State he wishes to ask the uestion from) and asks, What year was times in quick succession. If B fails to answer, or answer correctly (by stating that Delaware is one of the thirteen original States) before A finishes calling, A passes to C, takes a different State and asks him the same question regarding that State, three times, the same as he did B regarding Delaware. If 0 answers correctly the book goes to him and is shown down on the table to let all players see Bs mistake. But if 0 fails to answer correctly A passes to D, takes a different State and repeats the question. If D answers correctly the book goes to him but if not the book goes to A by default,

and A shows it doWn on the table to let all the players see their mistake.

Asking the question three times in quick succession may be omitted question asked only once.

A third game which may be played by the use of the cards is as follows: 1

The rules are the same as in the first and second games with the exception that :the players do not select questions to be asked.

A player desiring a card from another players hand will call for the card, naming The player called upon may ask the caller any question on the face of the card he wishes. If caller fails to answer correctly the play is the same as in the first and second games. The showdown is the same as the call; a player asking questions from a pair or book may ask any question he wishes.

Still another game which may be played is in the nature of a handicap and may be described as follows:

If a player or players familiar with the game Wish to play with a player who is not, they may play the second or third game while the player who is not familiar plays elaware admitted to Union? three l if wished and the the first or second, allowing the showdown to pass the unfamiliar player while he is playing the first game.

he game consists of forty-nine points and in counting the points a pair is equal to one point and a book to three points.

Having thus described the inventiom'what is claimed as new is:

1. A deck of playing cards certain cards of which bear upon one face a map and an emblem and upon the other face a map of a subdivision of the territory shown by the first-mentioned map, the said emblem being indicative of the territory shown in the seoof the book, and having upon its other face 10 ond-mentioned map. a symbol indicative of the State shown by 2. A deck of playing cards comprising a said map and also a map of the United card representing the District of Columbia, States, the indicators common to the cards of and twelve books of four cards each, each the respective books being duplicated on the card of the books having upon one face a respective States in the map of the United 15 map of a State of the United States, an in- States.

dicator common to all the cards of the same In testimony whereof I afiix my signature. book, and means identifying the other cards HENRY W. WELLS. [L. S]

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3817533 *May 23, 1973Jun 18, 1974Leidenfrost CEducational card game
US4512746 *Sep 15, 1982Apr 23, 1985Donald TurnerMathematical teaching cards
US4824119 *Jun 20, 1988Apr 25, 1989Matthews Charles CBack spelling card game
US5439232 *Jan 15, 1993Aug 8, 1995Pollock; John S.Educational card game
US5467997 *Dec 13, 1994Nov 21, 1995Bashirzadeh; RaminMethod of using informational playing cards
US5632488 *Jul 28, 1995May 27, 1997Sturm; William C.Educational political card game apparatus and method of play
US5690336 *Nov 26, 1996Nov 25, 1997Oliver; Matilda JoanneEducational card game
US5927719 *Feb 19, 1997Jul 27, 1999Young; Olivia L.Region-suited geography playing card deck with main information and place-filler suit cards; a companion deck; and games
US6145839 *Dec 24, 1998Nov 14, 2000Katsion; MarleneMovie game
US6234803 *Jan 20, 2000May 22, 2001Jacqueline T. WatkinsEducational treasure hunt game
US6330942May 12, 2000Dec 18, 2001June K. RaymondCoin collecting card and information relating thereto
US6685188Oct 25, 2001Feb 3, 2004Rehbein JuergMethod and apparatus for performing a transaction without the use of spoken communication between the transaction parties
US8602788 *Aug 5, 2010Dec 10, 2013Alan G. FISHELGeography based card game and method of play
US8740619Nov 6, 2013Jun 3, 2014Alan G. FISHELGeography based card game and method of play
US20040083111 *Oct 25, 2001Apr 29, 2004Jurg RehbeinMethod and apparatus for performing a transaction without the use of spoken communication between the transaction parties
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/296, D21/376, 273/302
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/02