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Publication numberUS1293535 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 4, 1919
Filing dateNov 24, 1917
Priority dateNov 24, 1917
Publication numberUS 1293535 A, US 1293535A, US-A-1293535, US1293535 A, US1293535A
InventorsRay P Perry
Original AssigneeBarrett Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Centrifugal apparatus and process for shaping plastic material.
US 1293535 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

^ R. P. PgRRY. CENTRIFUGAL APPARATUS AND PROCESS FOR SHAPING PLASTIC MATERIAL. APPLICATION FILED NOV. 24.19l7.

l ,@@y Patented Feb. 4, 1919.

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'rr rr s aanirrca l UPPERIMONTCLAIR, NEW JERSEY, ASSIGNOR TO THE BARRETT COMPANY, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY.

CENTRIFUG-AL PIPARATUSAN l)V PROCESS FOR SHAPING PLASTIC MATERIAL.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Feb. 4L, 1919.

Application led November 24, 1917. Serial No. 203,779.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, RAY zen of the United States, residing at Upper Montclair, in the county of Essex and State of New Jersey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Centrifugal Apparatus and Processes for Shaping Plastic Material, of which the following 1s a specification.

My invention relates to a process of and machine for treating materials in fluid, that is, either in gaseous or in liquid forni), or both. The apparatus of my invention may be used for many purposes, and in one of theforms disclosed such apparatus may be employed to effect an intimate intermixture of two different materials in fluid form. My apparatus may also be used for making filamentaryl tubes of capillary dimensions.

Referring to the drawing, wherein I .have

i illustrated my invention,

Figure 1 is a view partly in section and partly in elevation of the preferred form ofy my invention;

Fig. 2 is a detail cross-sectional view showing one of the forms which a material treated in my apparatus may acquire;

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional detail view of a modification; j

Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional detail view of another modification; and

Fig. 5 is an end View, on an enlarged scale, of thetubes shown in Fig. 4. i

Fig. 6 is a sectional view, partly broken away, showing a gas tight connection.

1 indicates a receptacle having a substan tially cylindrical form. The receptacle 1 is provided with a plurality of apertures 2,72,

v2. These apertures may be disposed in any desired manner andmay be provided in any desired number and '-may be of any desired shape. I prefer to arrange the apertures in a Series of horizontal rows in the side walls of "the receptacle 1. Within the receptacle 1 i-s 'a receptacle 1 which is vixedly attached at the bottom thereofto the inner wall of the bottom of the receptacle 1. The receptacle 1 may be cylindrical or have any other i desired form. Attachedto and Acommunicating with the receptacle 1 are the tubelike elongated members 2 whose outer ends are located adjacent to vand project through the apertures 2. A

Communicating with the receptacle 1 P. PERRY, a citi-- .fluid form which is contained within the receptacle 13. Such receptacle 13 is supported by the bracket members 15 from the support 14. Communicating with the receptacle 1 through the opening 10 of the cover member 11 is the tube 9 having therein the stopcock 12 controlling ,the supply of material 2 3 in fluid form contained within the receptacle 23. The receptacle 23 is supported by the brackets 15 from the support 14. The receptacle 1 is secured to the vertical shaft 3 supported in the bearing 1. Mounted on the shaft 3 a short distance above the top of the vbearing 4 is the bevel gear 5 which meshes with the corresponding gear 6 on the horizontal shaft 7 of the electric or other motorS. The bearing 4 and the motor 8 are supported upon the member 25. Radial plates 16 may be provided in the receptacle 1 and radial plates 16 in the receptacle 1 to prevent slipping between the fluid and the receptacles so as to make certain that the fluids will be carried around bodily in the i receptacles and have centrifugal force imof the gears l5 and 6 and the motor 8, the ,liuids supplied thereto from the containers 13 and 23 will be driven by centrifugal these fluids maybe liquids, or both maybe gases, or either may be a liquid andthe other a gas. If the fluids are gases, a gas tight connection will be provided between the inlet tubes 9 and 9 and the corresponding cover members .of the respective receptacles 'force or vby hydrostatic pressure, or both, y

in order to prevent loss of the materials. In this case the gas may be introduced'under pressure to aid the centrifugal force in expelling the same through the openings.

Such a connection is illustrated in Fig. 6 in which the tubes 9 and 9 enter through a fixed disk 31 which has depending flanges 32 and 32. Between these flanges and the upper Vopen ends of the receptacles land 1 are placed gaskets 33 and 33, respectively, to form gas tight joints and take the wear.

Itis often desirable to treat molten materials which become solidified on cooling in the air. are of such a nature, it is possible to form filaments consisting of the two materials, a thread of the material 23 being within an inclosing sheath or tube of the material 13. Such a product is illustra-ted in Fig. 2 where the material 23 forms the inner thread a and the material 13 forms the outer sheath or tube a of what might be termed a composite filament. For such a product the materials 13 and 23 may 4consist of molten bituminous materials,fsuch as molten pitch or asphalt. Where materials such as waxes are treated, shot rather than filaments will be formed with the result that the shot so formed will be made up of mixtures of the two materials 13 and 23.

In Fig. 3 I have illustrateda modified form of apparatus wherein the receptacle 20 l has provided therein the apertures 21 in any suitable arrangement and number. Within the receptacle 2O and fixedly attached thereto 'is the. mem-ber 22 on the sides of which are arranged the pins or similar members 23. The outer ends of the pins 23 protrude into the apertures 21 so that such apertures are vthereby provided with annular openings.

This type of apparatus may be used for making filamentary tubes of capillary dimensions. The apparatus illustrated in Fig. 1 may also be used to produce filamentary tubes of capillary dimensions. In such a case the material 13, of `any desired filament-forming material, is eJected by eenv- V trifugal forcethrough the apertures 2, which may have any desired form, while through the tube-likemembers 2 which may have any desired cross-section a gaseous fluid, such as air, under pressure is emitted. This fine stream of air serves at once to prevent the semi-molten tubes from collapsing and also to help cool the same from the interior yof the tubes','the air or other gaseous medium being cooled below. its normal temperature, if desired, to increase. the cooling effect. The fluids may be mixed by being thrown out from tubes whose ends lie close together as illustrated. For example, in the modification shown in Fig. 4 the apertures 102 from the receptacle 1 are slightly elongated tubes each one of which converges toward the corresponding tube 102 from the inner rc- "Where the materials 13 and 23.

ceptacle 1. These apertures 102 and tubes 102 may be of any desired number and of any desired shape in cross-section. It is thus evident that instead of' the fluidsbeing mixed by one being introduced within the other they maybe mixed by being forcibly thrown out in streams directed toward each other as shown.

lVhat I claim is:

1. In an apparatus of `the character described, a revoluble receptacle having a plurality of lateral apertures, means communieating with said receptacle for providing the same with a supply of material in fluid form, and means located adjacent and within each of said apertures for providing a substantially annular opening at each such aperture.

2. In an apparatusl of' the character described, a receptacle having a plurality of lateral apertures, me'ans communicating with said receptacle for providing the same with a supply of material in fluid form, a container Within the said receptacle, means communicating with said container for providing the same with a supply of material in fluidform, a plurality of tube-like members communicating with and fixedly attached to the said container, the outer ends of the Said members Ibeing positioned adjacent and within said apertures, and means for rotating the said container and receptacle together.

3. In a centrifugal apparatus of the character described, a substantially cylindrical receptacle having a plurality of horizontally disposed rows of lateral apertures, means communicating with said receptacle for providing the same with a supply of material in fluid form, a substantially cylindrical container within the said receptacle and fixcdly positioned with respect to the latter, means communicating with said container for providing the same With a supply of material in fluid form, a plurality of tube-like members lcommunicating with and 'fixedly attached to the said container, the outer ends of the said members being positioned adjacent and within said apertures, and means for rotating the said container and receptacle together.

4. In an apparatus of the character described, a revoluble receptaclehaving a plurality of lateral apertures, means communieating with said receptacle for. providing the same with a supply of material in Huid form, a container within said receptacle, means for supplying said container with a fluid, tubes leading from said container and terminating adjacent the apertures in the receptacle.

5. In an apparatus of the character described, a revoluble receptacle having a plurality of lateral apertures, means communii eating with said receL tacle for providing the same with a supply of mate-rial in fluid form, a container within said receptacle, means for supplying said container with a fluid, tubes leading from said container .and terminating adjacent the apertures in the receptacle and at an angle thereto.

6. In an apparatus of the class described, an inner receptacle, an outer revoluble receptacle, tubes leading from the inner receptacle, openings in the outer receptacle in proximity to the ends of said tubes.

7. The process of makin-g tubular filaments, comprising the steps of extruding molten filament-forming material by means of centrifugal force throughha .substantially annular aperture into a cooling medium, thereby forming a semi-molten tube of such material, and simultaneousl with `said extrusion sending a fluid medium under pressure into the bore of the tube to prevent the same from collapsing and to permit the same to cool and solidify in tubular form.

8. The process of making tubular lilaments, comprising the steps of extruding molten lilament-forming vmaterial by means of centrifugal force through a substantially annular aperture into a cooling medium,

v thereby forming a semi-molten tube of such material, and simultaneously with said ex' truson sending a Huid cooling medium under pressure into the bore of the tube to prevent the same from collapsing and tov cause the same to cool and solidify in tubular form.

9. The process of making tubular filaments, comprising the steps of extruding molten filament-forming material by means of centrifugal force through a substantially annular aperture into a cooling medium, thereby forming a semi-molten tube of such material, and simultaneously with said extrusion sending a gaseous cooling medium undery pressure into the bore of the tube to prevent the same from colla-psin and to cause the same to cool and. solidify m tubular form.

10. The process of making tubular Eilaments which comprises the steps of introducing molten filament-forming material into a revolving centrifugal machine, permitting said material to pass out of said machine through apertures, and simultaneously send ing a Huid cooling medium under pressure through the central portion of said apertures.

In testimony whereof l affix my si 1 ature,

` RAY P. PERY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3400189 *Sep 14, 1964Sep 3, 1968Dow Chemical CoProcess for centrifugally spinning hollow or filled filaments
US3409712 *Jul 22, 1966Nov 5, 1968Dow Chemical CoMethod of devolatilization of synthetic resinous thermoplastic materials
US3642399 *Oct 9, 1969Feb 15, 1972Fibercast GmbhCentrifugally cast pipe fittings
US4226576 *Jan 18, 1978Oct 7, 1980Campbell Soup CompanyProtein texturization by centrifugal spinning
US4790736 *Jul 20, 1984Dec 13, 1988John E. BenoitApparatus for centrifugal fiber spinning with pressure extrusion
US4894004 *Nov 4, 1988Jan 16, 1990Davidson Textron Inc.Apparatus for molding multi-colored plastic shells
US4938906 *Nov 22, 1989Jul 3, 1990Davidson Textron Inc.Process for molding multi-colored plastic shells
US5906838 *Dec 13, 1993May 25, 1999The Quaker Oats CompanySymmetrical flow extrusion manifold
US6206678Jan 14, 1999Mar 27, 2001The Quaker Oats CompanySymmetrical flow extrusion manifold
US6280672Dec 20, 2000Aug 28, 2001The Quaker Oats CompanyMethod of extruding multiple continuous bodies of radially-layered product
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/503, 425/8, 264/172.17, 425/130, 264/172.15, 264/311, 264/209.1, 264/563
Cooperative ClassificationB29C47/24