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Publication numberUS1295355 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 25, 1919
Filing dateAug 3, 1915
Priority dateAug 3, 1915
Publication numberUS 1295355 A, US 1295355A, US-A-1295355, US1295355 A, US1295355A
InventorsGeorge Francis Myers
Original AssigneeSubmarine Arms Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Torpedo.
US 1295355 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. F. MYERS.

TORPEDO APPLICATION FILED AUG. 3. 1915- 1,295,355. Patented Feb.25, 1919.

4 SHEETS-SHEET I.

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W/fesses lm enfar G. F. MYERS.

TORPEDO.

APPLICA'HON FILED AUG-3,1915.

4 SHEETSSHEET 2.

Patented Feb. 25,1919.

G. F. MYERS.

TORPEDO.

APPLICATlON FILED AUG-3,19I5.

Patented Feb. 25, 1919.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

51 1111111 1111 1111111 11 11 11 11 1111 \w vw N R 2 i1i!}I km I I n llllll mrenfor G. F. MYERS.

TOBPEDO.

APPLICATION FILED AUG.3. 1915.

1,295,355. Patented Feb. 25, 1919.

4 SHEETS-SHEEI 4.

N Mass Y TED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

GEORGE FRANCIS MYERS, OF BUFFALO, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO SUBMARINE ARMS CORPORATION, OF NEW YORK, Y.

TORPEDO.

To all whom it may concern:

. Be it lsnown that I, GEORGE FRANCIS Mvn'ns, a citizen of the United States, and residing at Buffalo, in the county of Erie and State of New York, have invented a new and useful Torpedo, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to an improvement in marine vessels, commonly known aS submarines, but having as its principal characteristic such form and dimensions that it can, and is primarily intended to be readily inserted and projected from a torpedo firi tube such as is generally carried by nava vessels and it is closely allied with that class of automatically controlled weapon (carrying an explosive charge and projected from a launching tube) known as a torpedo to the extent stated, and in addition has an independent dirigibility and functional action not possessed by the automobile torpedo and is capable of a far greater range of action than that weapon is capable of, even to the extent of returning to its base or starting point after having performed its mission.

After having been launched itmay be stopped, started or reversed; it may be deviated from its straight course, 6r dive, rise,

maneuver, deliver its explosive charge, reconnoiter and return to its base to receive another charge if desired. i

In acquiring this increased adaptability and efliciency of my invention over the automobile torpedo I have associated with the vessel proper certain combinations of elements variously placed and functioning under the control of a human operator, having a compartment for his occupancy, and if the.

hull be made large enough an assistant or associate operator may be employed therein;

all of which is herinafter fully described in detail and illustrated by the accompanying drawings, in which Figure l is a perspective view of my invention as it would appear in use after leaving the firing tube; Fig. 2 a front elevation; Fig. 3 a rear elevation; Fig. 4 a cross-sectional view taken at AA Fig. 2; Fig. 5 a cross-sectional view' taken at BB Fig. 2; Fig. 6 a cross section taken at 0-0 Fig. 5; Fig. 7 a cross section taken at DD Fig. 5; Fig. 8 a

side elevation of the extreme stern, Fig.

9 a front elevation of the upper portion ofthe periscope; Fig. 10 a cross section "of same; Fig. 11 a plan view of same;

Specification of Letters Patent.

a cross section of the portion of t 'erably divided into three sections 14: connected to Patented Feb. 25, 1919.

Application filed August 3, 1915. Serial No. 43,399.

Fig. 12 a diagram of electric circuits controlling the air circulating system Fig. 13

he vessel wherein is located the pivotal mounting of the periscope; Fig. '14 a cross section taken at E-E Fig. 13; Fig. 15 a plan view of Fig. 13; Fig. 16 a cross section of the eriscope cap adapted for horizontal vision; Fig. 17 a horizontal cross section taken at FF Fig. 16; and Fig. 18 a vertical cross section on line X-Y Fig. 17, showing the mirror in a vertical position.

1 i a shell or hull, having an outline or form similar to the automobile torpedo now in general use. but with the interior prefor compartments, 2, 3 and 4, separated by bulkheads 5 and 6. The forward compartment 2 contains preferably a group of projectiles 7 and 8 contained in tubes 9 and 10, these projectiles being preferably of different sizes for purposes 7 hereinafter explained. The intermediate compartment 3, havin a hatch 3 conveniently located, is provi ed for the operator and he is shown in Fig.

56 and 58 with the various manipulating .control elements within easy reach.

The after compartment 4 contains the ropulsion motor, herein shown as a gaso ene engine driving the oppositely revolving propellers 12 and 13 as is usual in machines of this class, 12 rotating by the control shaft the motor and the propeller 13 being attached or mounted upon the hollow shaft 15 and rotated in the opposite direction by means of bevel gears 16, thus to equalize the torque, or tendency to twist or rotate the torpedo.

It is apparent that in a vessel of this character wherein the operator is wholly inclosed within the hull there must be some means by which visibility of surroundin or location is afi'ordedthe operator that 0 may work intelligently such as the periscope commonly used by submarines, which projects vertically therefrom. But it is equally obvious that a perisco e as thus constructed would "not .be applica' 1e to. a torpedo form of submarine vessel adapted to be firedcfrom features of vertical sight and fire enabling the operator to observe conditions above the torpedo and protect himself from 4 ,a1rcraft'. A description of the construction the operator is a recess 17, formed in the hull At the rear end of this shown in Fig. 13, there .or shell, having parallel sides 18 and a plain closure 19 at its forward end and a stepped closure at its rear end 20. Attached to the underside of this recess is a tube 21 extend: ing from the stepped end forward and 'beyond the end 19 at which end thereis anopening 22 pointing downwardly and having a ninety-degree reflecting medium 23. tube which is closed, is another such me-. dium 24. The rear end of the tube forms an- L with its short length 25 projecting vertically therefrom. Within this yertical portion is suitably mounted for rotation a short length of tubing 25' having a retainer 26 and a gear 27 formed at its /lower edge. 'Its upper edge is serrated as at 28. Secured within is a transparent disk 29 whose upper surface coincides with the lower edge ofthe serration. Secured to the upper surface of the tube 21 is a bearing 30, in which is mounted shaft 31 carrying pinion or gear 32 which engages gear 27. The shaft extends through the entire length of the tube and projects through the forward end carrying a hand wheel 33. Pivotally mounted, adja cent to the vertical section of the tube 25 by means of binge 34,. is a tube 35. Within this vtube is another tube 36. which has a serrated tube 36 is ,secured a end 37 corresponding of the short tube wit tube 36 is in an erect to the serrated edge 28 which it engages when position. Within the transparent disk 38. Tube 35 carries a structure formed of a" casing 39 having. a form such as would present the least resistance to forward movement closure 41,; the bottom being and leave as little disturbance as possible in its wake having a top closure 40 and bottom at aposition properly distant from the huge 34 to cause bottom 41 to rest squarely'upon, and entirely in contact with, step 42 of thefperiscope recess when the periscopes movable member is raised to.a vertical position.- In Fig. 10 it is shown that tube '36 extends beyond the tube 35 at its upper end. 'Secured to tube 36 is the cap 43 having an opening 44 covered by glass 45. A ninety-degree reflecting medium 46 is positioned in the cap at the junc-- v ture of the axis of hole 44 and tube 36. In

Fig. 4 is shown a-mirror 47 suitably mounted toreflect light from reflector 23 m tube 21 to the operators eye; Thus it willbe evident that there is clear vision from his eye to the outside of the torpedo when'theperiscope is vertical, hrough reflectors 47, 23', 24, 46 and the hole/44.. Referring to 16, 17 and 1s, 43'

trolled by is a transparent cap se- .cured to stationary tube 35. The mirror secured in frame 46' is pivotally mounted" on bearings 48 formed on the revolving tube 36. 49 is a pinion carried upon the mirror 71; shaft and is adapted to engage segmental rack 56' formed on the end of tube 35, for rotating the mirror upon its free shaft, the mirror remaining in its inclined position when not engaging the rack as its rotation is opposed by a frictionpressure-on its bearings. When the torpedo is not in active service or is within its firing tube the periscopes movable member lies within the recess 17'relug 48 located upon the top closure 40 of the periscope casing and adapted to engage the projecting stem 49 of the armature having an elastic opposition of electromagnet or solenoid 50 connected with an electric circuit, and which'is mounted upon the stationary member of the periscope and is cona push button 51 conveniently placed within reach of the operator. Located within the recess 17 is a leaf spring 52 adapted to be held compressed by the folded and latched periscope member. The spring possessessuflicient power and range to throw theperiscope out of and above the recess 17, its further movement to a vertical position being accomplished preferably by the pressure of the water as the vessel travels forward. In.its vertical or active position the lower closure 41 rests upon and in close con tact withstep 42' of the recess 17 and serrated ends 28 and 37 of tubes 25' and 36 are engaged for mutual rotation. The water pressure may be sufficient to retain the periscope vertically, but means is also provided for locking it thus, which may be necessary in traveling astern, which consists'preferably of a magnetic device as shown in Figs. 4 and 13, where 53 is a pair of electromagnets secured within the hull and at their upper ends to the step 42 of the recess 17. 110 Lower closure 41 being composed of a suitable metal will be held, as an armature, against the poles of the magnets. A controlling switch 54 in circuit with these magnets .is located within convenient reach of 115. the operator. It will now be apparent that by this novel construction a periscope is provided that'can be folded to a positionwithin the outline of the hull for the purpose of allowing its entry into the torpedo firing tube. 120 My folding periscope forms part of a combination ofelements which I employ to function in other important features of fny invention which will now be set forth.

. In illustrating my invention I have em- 125 ployed an internal combustion. motor or motor using liquid fuel, for propulsion, or

it maybe any form of motor requiring a supply of air or its equivalent to ..promote its operation. This could be supplied from a 130 ing described means to supply air to the engine asrequired during the consumption of the entire fuel supply: 55 is the motor supplied with fuel from the tanks 56 through the pipe 57. 58 is a flask of stored air resting upon the bottom of the operators compartment having a pipe 59 communicating with the after compartment 4. Air from the flask is controlled by a pressure reducing valve 60 and a valve 61 which is shown in an open position by magnet62 against the action of spring 62 in the manner shown in Figs. 4, 5 and 12 Air from outside the vessel is also supplied to the after compartment and motor, alternating with the air in flask 58, as the upper end of the periscope submerges or emerges from the water. To accomplish this I utilize the space 63 as an air passage having an outlet 63 in the top 40, provided with a hinged cover 64:. Communication between this space and the afterbody is established in the manner shown in Fig. 13 thus: Ahinged valve 67 is located upon the step 42 of the recess 17 opening into the pipe 68 which terminates in the after compartment 4 and .from which depends drip pipe 69. A valve 70 opens inwardly to the space 63. Both of these valves are normally closed by their springs as shown until the periscope is brought to its operative or active position in which case the projection 71 engages with valve lid 70 causing it to open, and projection 72 operates similarly upon valve lid 67 thus opening up the passage. The valve lid 64 is connected by link 65 to armature 66, which is controlled by electro-magnet 7 3, opposing the action of spring 74. Conveniently located within reach of the operator is the switch 75. Fig. 12 shows the method of connecting the valves 64 and 61, the flask controlling magnet 62 and the controlling switch 7 5, which is accomplished by using but two wires 76 and 77 and a grounded connection 78 and 82. Winding of magnet 73 is connected or grounded at one terminal to the periscope casing as 78 and its other terminal to wire 76 connecting with female member of plug switch 79, the male member 80 of which is connected to one end of winding of valve magnet 62. The other terminal of this magnet is connected to the source of energy 81 which is in turn connected to switch and through same to the ground connection at 82. Intermediate the switch 75 and source of energy 81 is a connection 83 from which is led a wire 77 through scope casing for firing skyward as a protection against air craft and to this end I show in substance an arrangement by which this may be accomplished. 88 is a gun of any suitable design secured within the'casing 39 with its muzzle passing through the closure 40 and covered by the flap orcover 89. 90. is an electromagnet with its circuit and source of energy 91, shown in diagrammatic form, with switch 92 which would be placed within the operators compartment; The armature 93 is connected by link 94 to the gun muzzle cover 89 and also to a rod passing downwardly through guide 95 to a proper position for operating trigger 96 after cover 89 has opened sufficiently to clear the path of the projectile. A spring 97 connects the armature with the top old sure 40 ofthe casing tending to keep the muzzle cover closed when armature 93 is not energized thus preventing water from entering the gun.

In the forward compartment 2 the projectiles 7 and 8 are shown within their firing tubes 9 and 10, the larger one being placed underneath in order to have the center of gravity low as possible, with pipes, as 98, connecting each one with the bus-pipe 99, passing through bulk-head 5 to the flask 58. Each pipe 98 has a valve 99 with stem passing through the bulkhead and terminating in a handle 100. In the forward end of the hull and in line with, each projectile are hinged covers 101 and 102. The large one 102 carries an electric head light '103 in casing 104 which is furnished with lens 105 covering the opening 106 in-the cover. A switch or push button 106 in the operators compartment controls the head light. Just 110 above the large cover hinge is a tube 107 having a lens covered opening at 108 in its forward end and its other end passing through the bulkhead. It there forms an L 109 passing downwardly center-line of the hull as shown in Fig. 7 where it again forms an L 110 and terminates within a convenient distance from the operators eye. Within the said Ls are se-' cured ninety-degree reflecting members. By 120 this arrangement a view of thesurroundings forward of the torpedo can be had by the operator. 111 'is a ballast tank-having its rear end opening to the outside of the hull by pipe 112,which has a controlling'valv e 125 113 operated by electromagnet 114 andcontrolled by electric push button 114. At the forward end of the tankis a similar valve 115, which is normally closed and controlled by electric push button 116, operated by 0 to one side of the 115 magnet 116 controlling air from the flask 58 through pipe 117 to the'tank 111. The aropposing the magnetic attraction.

The steering of the torpedo both vertically and horizontally is accomplished in the usual manner common to this class of machines by the use of vertical rudders 118 .and horizontal rudders 119 having connecting cables 120 and 121. Th actuating system for controlling the rudders may be of any of the matures of these valve magnets have springs I well known devices .for this purpose as practised in the submarine and torpedo art.

, head.

The operation of my invention is as follows:

The operator takes up his position within his compartment lying upon the pad and. 1 inserting his head in the rest strap. With the periscope folded and latched within its recess the torpedo "is inserted in the firing tube from which it' is launched. As the machine is entirely self-contained and independently dirigible the vessel carrying the firing tu e may not necessarily aim at the target and may fire several torpedoes from difl'erent. sides, thus causing no delay or trouble inturning large vessels especially when they carry submerged torpedo tubes.

' Having emerged fromthefiring' tube the operator starts his propeller engine and presses electric push button 51 releasing the eriscope which rises to its vertical position. f at the start the torpedo is at; a depth where the top of the periscope is submerged the wave actlon or pressure of the water will I close the valve64 preventing an inrush of water. A small; portion may enter during the valve action but this will bedrawn through the drippipe '69 and expelled by proper means such as a bilgepump. Upon the closing of valve 64, stopping olf the out-. side air supply to the englne, air will be automatically released from the flask 5 8 Y which will continue until the emerges. Thus a constant a ternating supply of air will be furnished the motor. The closing of valve 64 and opening of valve 61 supplying air fromthe flask 58 to the water may be performed by closing switch' 7 5 peri-scope again when desirable. The operator Wlll now contin'ue his course whether at surfaceor submerged. If he desires to-submerge 4 he presses electric push button 114:" which causes magnet 114 to open the valve 113 be located within the torpedo or and fuel therefor comprising1 allowing water to enter the tank 111 causing the vessel to descend to adepth governed by the increased weight proportional to the amountof water admitted. To ascend the; button 116 is pressed, together with button 114', allowingair from the flask 58 to expel 'the water thereby'increa-sing the buoyancy of the torpedo and causing it to rise.

With

the periscopeabove water the operator may observe the surrounding condition by revolving the hand wheel33. In turning the mirror from G to H, J or K, Fig.r17, it remains at a forty-five degree inclination. When desiring to look above the torpedo he turns tube 36 until the segmental rack rotates the mirror sufliciently to bring it to a vertical position as in Fig. 18. This will enable him to see above and direct the time of firin the periscope n.

Wheri submerged the operator may ob; serve'objects ahead such as ex losive or other submarines through tu 107 which forms a horizontal periscope and is assisted by the. illumination of the headlight controlled by the switch in his compartment.

1 When the torpedo is within striking distance of the target the operator, selecting the $129 of projectile most suited to accomplish I the desired result from an economical standpoint, pulls the corresponding valve lever controllingthe expelling medium, which fires the projectile from its tube through the forward door. j

, Having described my invention, I claim: 1. Asubmergible vessel comprising a hull,

a projectile compartment in the forward part of the said hull, an operators compartment amidships, an engine compartment aft,

-' and adisa pearing pivotable sighting device its component parts assembled lying wit below the periphery of the said operatofls compartment when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

2. A submergible vessel comprising ahull, a projectile compartment in the forward part of-the said hull, an operators compartment amidships, an engine compartment aft,

and a disappearing. pivotable sighting de vice lyingwith its component parts assembled outside of the sheathing but recessed within the outer periphery of the said operators compartment when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

3. A submergible vessel comprisingla hull, a compartment in the said hu 1 for olding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a compartment for holding an englue the said compartments being in aline ment one with the other and the said engine compartment comprising a gasolene engine atmospheric and air, a tube through whic gasolene oil k air is 'normally'admitted to the said engine,

.a valve in th said tube, 0 air under pressure, a valve n the sand tank,

a tank containingand means comprising'connections leading from one valve tothe other to open the said second mentioned valve substantially at the instant that the said first mentioned valve closes;

4. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a compartment in the said hull for holding a pro ectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a compartment for holding an engine the said compartments being in aline ment one with the other and the said engine compartment comprising a gasolene engine and fuel therefor comprising gasolene oil and air, a tube through which atmospheric air is'normally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a tank containing air under pressure, a valve in the said tank, and automatic means comprising connections leading from one valve to the other to open the said second mentioned valve substantially at the instant that the said first mentioned valve clo'ses.

5. A submergible vessel comprising a hull,

a compartment. in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a compartment for holding an engine the three compartments being inalinement one with the other and the said engine compartment comprising a gasolene engine and fuel therefor comprising gasor lene oil and air, a tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a tank containing air under pressure, a valve in the said tank, means when the first mentioned valve closes to open the said second mentioned valve, and means comprising connections leadin from one valve to the other when the said first mentioned valve re-opens to close the said second mentioned valve.

6. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding anoperator, a compartment for holding an engine the three compartments being in alinement one with the other and the said engine compartment comprising a gasolene engine and fuel therefor comprising gasolene oil and air, a tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a tank containing air under ressure, a valve in the said tank, automatic means when the said first mentioned valve closes to open the said second mentioned valve, and automatic means comprising connections leading-from one valve to the other when the said first mentioned valvere-opens to close the said second mentioned valve. 4

7. A submergible vessel comprising a hull,

a compartment in the said hull for holding a pro ectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a compartment for holding an engine the said compartments being in alinement one with the other and the said engine ed in the said" compartment, a tube through e .form surrounding the sai compartment comprisinga gasolene engine and fuel therefor comprising gasolene oil and air, a tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a;compressed air tank a valve therein, means for opening and closin the same, and means for holding the said means permitting the waves to close the said first mentioned valve and thereby acting on the said means for opening the said second mentioned valve. I

8. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a projectile compartment in the orward part of the said hull, an operators compartment amidships, an engine compartment aft, a disappearing sighting device lying'with its component parts assembled below the periphery of the said operators compartment when inactive and projecting above the same when active, a gasolene engine mountwhich atmospheric air is admitted to said engine, and a casing of stream line sighting device and the said tube. I

9. A submergible vessel comprising a hull,

and a disappearing member comprising a .stream line form casing with its greatest width forward of its transverse center line lying with its component parts assembled below the periphery of the said hull when I inactive and projectingabove the same when active, means for hol ng the said member in its inactive position and means for hold' ing the same in its active position, the said means also lying below the periphery ofthe said hull.

rst mentioned valve open, the said.

10. A submergible vessel comprising a 'hull, an operators compartment in the said hull, and a disappearing member compris ing a substantially hollow shell lying uncovered 'and with its component parts assembled inside of the outer periphery of the said operators compartment when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

11. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, and a disappearing and pivotable member comprising a substantially hollow shell i lying with its component parts assembled below the periphery of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

12. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a disappearing member comprising a hollow shell forming an air duct leading to the interior of'the said hull and lying with its component-parts assembled below the periphery of thesaid hull rwhen inactive and projecting above the same when active, and a valve at one end of the said hollow shell.

13. A submergible vessel "comprising a hull, and a disappearin member comprising a substantially hollow s ell havin a revoluble member lying parallel with t e axis of the said shell. and lying with its component and a disappearing member comprising a substantially hollow shell comprising a sighting device lying uncovered and with its component parts assembled inside of the outer periphery of the said operators compartment when inactive and projectinga'bove the same when active. V

15. A submergible vessel comprising a I hull, and a disappearing pivotal member comprising a substantially hollow shell comprising asighting device and lying with its component parts assembled below the periphery of the said hull when inactive .and

'. projecting above the same when active.

16. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, and a disappearing sectional member comprising a substantially hollow shell com prising a periscope and lying below the periphery of the saidhull when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

17. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, .a compartment for holding an .operator, a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other and the said'enginecompartment comprising a heat engine and fuel therefor comprising liquid hydrocarbon and. acombustion supporting medium, means for admitting at- ,mospheric air to said engine, means for controlling the flow of said air, a flask containi mg a combustion supporting medium, means 1 0 for controlling the flow of said medium from said flask, and means operable to open means substane first sa d con-- the said second controllin tially at the instant that t trolling means closes. 18. A submergible vessel 1 comprising a r i hull,. and a disappearing member comprising a hollow" shell forming an air duct leading to theinterior of the said hull, and normallyv 'ly'in outside of the sheathing but recessed 5c insi e of the outer periphery of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

19. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, an operators compartment in the said hull, and a-di'sappearing member comprising a substantially hollow shell comprising a sightingdevice normally lying uncovered putside of the sheathing but recessed inside of the'outer periphery, of the said operators 0 compartment when inactive and projecting above the same when active. 20. A submer 'ble "vessel comprising a hull, an operators compartment in the said hull," and a disappearing member compris- 85 ing a substantially hollow shell comprising a cessed portion.

- shell.

erator must necessarily above the same when activ 21. "A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a recessed portion in the said hull, a sighting device lying inthe said recessed portion when inactive, and an operators compartment mounted below the said re- 22. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a disappearing member comprising a substantially hollow shell, and means comprising a suction .device for draining the sea water from the saidmem'ber.

:23. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a disappearing air duct, andi means for-draining the seawater from the said air duct, the said means comprising a pipe leadg from the saidair duct to a motor within the said hull.

24. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, ahollow shell comprising an air duct,

and a sighting device mounted within the said shell. I v v 25. A I submergible vessel comprising a hull, a pivotable hollow shell comprising an air duct, and a sighting device mounted within the said shell.

28. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a disappearing pivotable' hollow shell comprising an air, duct, and a si hting device mounted within the said 'shefl.

v 29. A submergible vessel. comprising a hull, a hollow shell comprising an air duct, and a periscope mounted within the said s t 30. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a disappearing pivotable hollow shell, of stream line form with its greatest width forward of its-transverse center line comprising an air duct; and a periscope mount- 1115 ed in the forward part of the said shell. 31. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of suchsmall cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding the operator, and a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other. 4

32. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the op-- L lie prone therein, and a plurality of bulkheads dividing the said hull into a projectilecompartment in the forward part thereof, an operators com- 'pa'rtment amidships, and an engine compartment aft.

. said hull into a projectile compartment in each of the same the forward part thereof, an operators compartment amidships, and an engine compartment aft, and closable openings for each of the said compartments.

34. VA submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the op erator must necessarily lie prone therein,

a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a projectile, a door in the forward portion of the said compartment,

means for firing the said projectile from out of the said compartment through the said door, a compartment for holding an operator, and a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

35. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, a compartment in the said hull for holding a plurality of projectiles with individual firing tubes and outer doors one above the other, a compartment for holding an operator, a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

36. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, a compartment in the said hull for holding a large projectile and smaller projectiles having its individual firing tube and outer door, a compartment for holding an operator, a sighting device for the operator, and a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

37. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, horizontal and vertical sight for the operator, and a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

38. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein,

, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a disappearing sighting member, and a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

39. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein,

a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a disappearing pivotable sighting member, and a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

40. A torpedo comprising a hull, a projectile compartment in the forward part of the said hull, an operators compartment amidships, an engine compartment aft, and a disappearing pivotable sighting device ,lying with its component parts assembled below the periphery of the said] operators compartment when inactive and projecting above the same when active. I

41. Asubmergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, acompartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a disappearing sighting member mounted outside the sheathing but recessed within the outer periphery of the said hull, and a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

42. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a resting place for the operator mounted parallel to the longitudinal center line of the vessel and adapted to hold the operator in a prone position, and a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

l3; A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a compartment for holding an engine comprising a gasolene engine and fuel therefor, the sald compartments being in alinement one with the other.

44. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, and a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other, the said engine compartment 45. A submergible vessel comprising a-hullof such small cross section that the operator must necessarilylie prone therein, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a

A three compartments being compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one wlth the other and the said engine compartment comprising a gasolene engine and fuel there ior comprlsing-gasolene oil and .air, a tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a tank containing air under pressure, a valve in the said tank, and means to open the said second mentioned valve substantially at the instant that the said first mentioned valve closes.

46. Asubmergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must: necessarily lie prone therein, acompartvalve substantiallyfiatthe instant that the said first mentioned valve closes.

47. A suhmergiblevessel comprising a hull .of suchsmall'cross section that the operator must necessarily he prone therein, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment 'for holding an operator, a compartment for holding an engine, the inalinement one with the'other, and the sa1d engine compartment, comprising a gasolene engine and fuel therefor comprising "gasolene oil and air, a

--tube throu h which atmospheric air is nor mally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a tank containing air under pressure, a valve in the said tank, means when the said first mentioned valve closes to openthe said second mentioned valve, and means when the said second mentioned valve re-opensto close the said second mentioned; valve;

- 48. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small crosssection that the operator must necessarily lie 'rone therein, a compartment in the said hul for holdin'g a projectile, a compartment for holding. an bperator, a compartment for holding an engine, the

three compartments being in alinement one with the other and the said engine compartment comprisinga gasolene engine and fuel therefor comprising gasolene oil and air, a

tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a tank containin air under pressure, a valve 1n the said tan automatic means when the first mentioned valve closes to open the said second mentioned valve, and automatic means when the first mentioned lying belowthe periphery of thesaid hull.

valve re-opens to close the said second mentioned valve. i

49; A torpedo comprising a hull,'.a compartment in the said hull for holding a propartment comprising a gasolene engine and fuel therefor comprising gasolene oil and air, 7a a tube through which atmospheric air is normally admltted to the said engine, a 'valve in the said tube, a compressed air tank, a valve therein, and means for holding the said first mentioned valve open, the said means permittin the waves to close the said first mentione valve and thereby opening the said second mentioned valve. s 50. A torpedo comprising a hull, and a disappearing member having a streamline form with its greatest width forward of its transverse center line lying below the periphery of the said'hull when inactive and projecting above the same When active, means for holding the said member in its inactive position, and'mean's for holding the same in its active position, the said meansalso lying below the periphery of the said hull.

' 51. A torpedo comprising .a hull, and a disappearing memberhaving a stream line form with itsgreatest Width forward of its transverse center line lying with its component parts assembled below the periphery of the said null when inactive and projecting above the same when active, means for" holding the said member in its inactive position, and means for holding the same in its active position, the said means also 52. A submergible 'vessel comprising a I hull of such small cross section that the operatol' must necessarily lie prone therein, and a disappearing member comprising a substantialy hollow shell lying with its component partsassembled below the periphery 11 0 of thesaid hull when inactive and'prO ecting above the same when active.

' '53. A submergible vessel comprising a 'hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, and a disappearing and ivotable member comprising a suhstantia y hollow shell lying with its component parts assembled vbelow V the periphery of the said hull when inactive and pro ecting abovethe "same when active. 54. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, a disappearing member comprising .a hollow shell forming an air duct leadmg to the interior of the said .hull and lying with its component arts assembled below the periphery of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same whenactive, and

a valve at one end of the said hollow shell. 180,

55. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, and a disappearing member comprising a substantially hollow shell having a revoluble member lying parallel with the axis of the said hull and lying with its component parts assembled below the periphery of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

56. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, and a disappearing member comprising a substantially hollow shell comprising a sighting device lying with its component parts assembled below the periphery of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active. 3

57 A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein,

and a disappearing pivotable member comprising a substantially hollow shell comprising a sighting device and lying with its component parts assembled below the periphery of the said hull when inactive and pro ecting above the same when active. 58. A sulbmergi'ble vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, an operators compartment, and a disappearing sectional member comprising a substantially hollow shell comprising. a periscope and lying below the outer periphery of the said compartment when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

59. A submergible 'vessels comprising a hull of such smallcross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, an operators compartment, and a disappearingmember normally lying outside of the sheathin but recessed inside of theouter periphery o the said hull, when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

60. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein,

,and a disappearing member comprising a hollow shell forming an air duct leading to the interior of the said hull and normally lying outside of the sheathing but recessed inside of the outer periphery of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same whenactive.

61. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, and a disappearing member comprising a substantially hollow shell comprising a sighting device normalelg lying outside of the sheathing but recess inside of the outer periphery of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

62. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, and a disappearing member comprising a substantially hollow shell comprising a periscope lying recessed inside the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

63. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operatormust necessarily lie pronetherein, a recessed portion in the said hull, a sighting device lying in the said recessed portion when inactive, and an operators compartment mounted below the said recessed portion.

64. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator.must necessarily lie prone therein, an operators compartment, a telephone instrument mounted. in the said compartment and wires leading from the said instrument through the said hull and out of. the same into the water in the rear of the said hull the said wires being disconnectible at substantially the rearmost portion of the said hull. I

65. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, a disappearing air duct, and means for draining the seawater from the said air duct, the said means comprising a pipe leading from the said air duct to a motor within the said hull. v

66. A torpedo comprising a hull, a hollow shell comprising an air duct, and a sighting device mounted within the said shell. 7

67. A torpedo comprising a hull, a pivot- -able hollow shell comprising an air duct,

pearing pivotable hollow shell-comprising an air duct, and a sighting device mounted within the said shell.

71. A torpedo comprising a hull, a hollow shell comprising an. air duct, and a periscope mounted within the said shell.

72. A torpedo comprising a hull, a disappearing pivotable hollow shell of stream line form with its greatest width forward of its transverse center line comprisin an air duct, and a perisco e mounted in the orward part of the said s ell.

73. A torpedo comprising a hull, a projectile compartment in the forward part of the said hull, an operators compartment amidships,

said hull except its an engine compartment aft, a disappearing sighting device lying with its component parts assembled below the periphery of the said operators compartment when inactive and projecting above the same when active, a gasolene engine mounted in the'said compartment, a, tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, and a sighting device in the said tube.

74. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, and a disappearing member normally lying recessed inside the periphery of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active the said recessed portion being of greater depth than width.

5. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, and a. disappearing member comprising a substantially hollow shell closable at both ends, lying inside the periphery of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

76. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone therein, and a disappearing member comprising a hollow shell having operative mechanism within the same and lying within the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

77. A torpedo comprising a hull, an operators compartment, a couch or support for the operator to lie upon in a semiupright position, and means for holding back the head of the operator.

78. A torpedo comprising a hull, an operatorscompartment, a couch or support for the operator to lie upon in a semiupright position, and means" for holding back the head of the operator comprising an ad justable strap fastened to the said hull and above the operator;

79. A submergible vessel comprising a hull having a projectionless exterior except its extended sighting device.

801 A submergible vessel comprising a hull having an exterior without vertical projections above the outer periphery of the extended air duct.

81. A submergible vessel comprising a hull having an exterior without vertical projections above the outer peripheryof the said hull except its extended sighting dervice,and air duct.

82. A submergible vessel comprising a hull having an exterior without vertical projections above the outer periphery of the said hull except itsextended-sighting device and air duct combined in a unitary structure. 4

83. A submergible vessel comprising a hull adapted to fit in a torpedo tube of similar shape and to be expelled therefrom, a compartment in said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, and a compartment for holding an en gine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

84:. A submergible vessel comprising a fusiform hull of such small diameter that the operator must necessarily lie prone, a compartment in said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, and a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being'in alinement one with the other.

85. A submergible vessel comprising a hull. a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other and the said engine comparment comprising a heat engine and fuel therefor comprising a liquid hydrocarbon and a combustion supporting medium, means by which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the engine, means for controlling the admission of said air, a tank containing compressed air or its equivalent, means for controlling the How of same from said tank, and means for automatically opening the said second mentioned controlling means substantially at the instant that the said first mentioned controlling me-ans closes.

86. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a compartmentfor holding an engine the three compartments being in alinement one with the other and the said engine compartment comprising a heat engine and fuel therefor comprising a liquid hydrocarbon, a tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a tank containing air or its equivalent under pressure, a valve in the said tank. means when the first mentioned valve closes to open the said second mentioned valve. and means comprising connections leading from one valve to the other when the first mentioned valve re-opens to close the said second mentioned valve.

87. A submergible vessel comprising a hull. a compartmentinthe said hull for holding a projectile, a. compartment for holding an operator. a compartment for holding an engine the three compartments being in alinement one with the other and the said engine compartment comprising a heat engine and fuel therefor comprising liquid hydrocarbon, a tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a tank con tainmg a1r or its equivalent under pressure,

a valve in the said tank, automatic means when the said first mentioned valve closes to open the said second mentioned valve, and automatic means comprising connections leading from one valve to the other when the said first mentioned valve re-opens to close the said second mentioned valve.

88. A submergible vessel comprising a hull closely enveloping an operator's body lying substantially parallel to the axis of the said hull, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, and a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

89. A submergible vessel comprising an elongated cylindrically shaped hull of substantially uniform diameter smooth exterior and tapering ends. a compartment in the said hull for holding, a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator," and a compartment for holding an engine, the saidcompartments being in alinement one with the other.

90. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, an air duct mounted on the said hull. a valve in the said duct, and means for keeping the said valve in its open position the said means permitting the waves to close the said valve.

91. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, an air duct mounted on the said hull, a valve in the said duct, means for keeping the said valve open the said means permitting the waves to close the said valve momentaril v and means for closing the said valve permanently.

92. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of suchsmall cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a compartment for holding an engine the said compartments being in alinement one with the other and the said engine compartments comprising an engine and fuel therefor comprising a liquid hydrocarbon and air, a tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a tank containing air or the like under pressure, a valve in the said tank, and automatic means to open the said second mentioned valve substantially at the instant that the said first mentioned valve closes.

93. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a member comprising a substantially hollow shell projecting beyond the periphery of the said hull, a pivotable valve in the upper portion of the said shell, means for holding the said valve open, the said means permitting the Waves to close the same, the said valve comprising a top and overhanging side portions.

94. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a member comprising a substantially hollow shell projecting beyond the periphery of the said hull, a valve in the upper part of the said shell, and means for openand automatic means when the said lastmentioned valve closes to open the said first mentioned valve.

95. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a projectile compartment] carrying a plurality of projectile tubes in the forward portion of the said hull and closely enveloped by the said hull, an operators compartment amidships. the said hull also closely enveloping the body of the operator, a sighting device delivering sight to the said operators compartment, an engine compartment aft, an engine in the said engine compartment and also closely enveloped by the said hull, and fuel for the said engine.

96. A submergible vessel comprising a hull closely enveloping an operators body lying substantially parallel to the. axis of the said hull the said axis passing substantially through the body of the operator, a projectile in the said hull through which the said axis also passes, an engine in the said hull through which the said axis also passes, and a sighting device for the operator mounted directly above his body.

97. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a compartment for holding an engine, the three compartments being in alinement one with theother, and the said engine compartment comprising an engine and fuel therefor, a tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a tank containing air or the like under pressure, a valve in the said tank, means when the said first mentioned valve closes to open the said second mentioned valve, and means when the said second mentioned valve re-opens to close the said second mentioned valve.

98. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, an operators compartment in the said hull, and a disappearing member lying substantially flush with the outside periphery of the said compartment and recessed within ber comprising a substantially hollow shell normally lying below the periphery of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active,

100. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, an operators compartment in the said hull, and a disappearing and pivotable member comprising a substantially hollow shell normally lying below the periphery of the said compartment when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

101. A submergible vessel comprising a hull of such small cross section that the operator must necessarily lie prone, a compartment in thesaid hull for holding an operator, a. compartment for holding an engine, the three compartments being in alinement one with the other and the said engine compartment comprising an engine and fuel therefor, a tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a tank containing air or the like under pressure, a valve in the said tank, automatic means when the said first mentioned valve closes to open the said second mentioned valve, and automatic means when the said first mentioned valve re-opens to close the said second mentioned valve.

102. A torpedo comprising a hull, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a compartment for holding an engine the said engine compartment comprising a heat engine and fuel therefor, a tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, a valve in the said tube, a compressed air tank,- a valve therein, and means for holding the said first mentioned valve open, the said means permitting the water to close the said first valve and thereby opening the said second mentioned valve. 103. A torpedo comprising a hull, a proectile compartment in the forward part of the said hull, an operators compartment ainidships, an engine compartment aft, a dlsappearing sighting device lying with its component parts assembled below the periphery of the said operators compartment when inactive and projecting above the same when active, an engine mounted in the said compartment, a tube through which atmospheric air is normally admitted to the said engine, and said sighting device in the said tube.

101. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, a member comprising a substantially hollow shell projecting beyond the periphcry of the said hull. a valve in the upper part of the said shell, and means for opening .the said valve the said means-permitting the said valve to close, a tank for compressed air or the like, a. valve in the same, automatic means to open the said last mentioned valve, and automatic means when the said second mentioned valve closes to open the said first mentioned valve.

105. A submergible vessel comprising a 'for holding back the head fusiform hull of suchsmall diameter that the operator must necessarily lie substantially prone. an operator's compartment, a couch or support for the operator to lie upon in a semi-prone position. and means of the operator.

106. A submergible vessel comprising a fusiform hull of such small diameter that the operator must necessarily lie substantially prone. an operator's compartment. a couch or support for the'operator to lie upon in a semi-prone position. and means for holding back the head of the operator comprising an adjustable strap fastened to the said hull and above the operator.

107. A submergible vessel comprising an elongated cylindrically shaped hull of substantially uniform diameter and with tapering ends closely enveloping the body of an operator and of such small diameter that he must necessarily lie prone therein. a compa tment in the said hull for holding a projectile. a compartment for holding the operator. and a compartment for holding an engine. the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

108. A submergible vessel comprising an elongated cylindrically shaped hull of sub stantially uniform diameter smooth exterior and with tapering ends adapted to fit in a similarly shaped torpedo tube and be expelled therefrom the said hull closely enveloping the body of the operator and of such small diameter that he must necessarily lie prone therein. a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile. a compartment for holding the operator, and a compartment for holding an engine. the

. said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

109. A submergible vessel comprising a hull. and a disappearing sectional member comprising a substantially hollow shell lying with its component parts assembled below the periphery of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

110. A submergible vessel comprising a hull, and a disappearing sectional member comprising a substantially hollow shell comprising an air duct lying .with its component parts assemble-d below the periphcry of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active.

111. A submergible .vessel comprising a hull. a disappearing sectional member comprising a substantially hollow shell comprising an air duct lying below the periphery of the said hull when inactive and projecting above the same when active, and a valve in the said air duct.

112; A submergible vessel comprising an elongated cylindrically shaped hull of substantially uniform diameter and tapering ends and without vertical projections above the outer periphery of the said hull except its extended sighting device, a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, and

a compartment for holding an engine, the

said compartment being in alinement one with the other. 7

113. A submergible vessel comprising an elongated cylindrically shaped hull of substantially uniform diameter and tapering ends and without vertical projections above the outer periphery of the said hull except its extended sighting device and air duct,

a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, and a compartment for holding an engine, the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

114. A submergible vessel comprising a hull. a compartment in the said hull for holding a projectile, a compartment for holding an operator, a disappearing pivotable sighting member, and a compartment for holding an engine the said compartments being in alinement one with the other.

GEORGE FRANCIS MYERS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4033225 *Feb 6, 1974Jul 5, 1977The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyHydrodynamic configuration to be used on underwater launched, unpropelled bodies
US5549065 *Mar 27, 1995Aug 27, 1996The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyWater vehicle and a directional control device therefor
US5551363 *Mar 27, 1995Sep 3, 1996The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyUnderwater vehicle and a combination directional control and cable interconnect means
US5551364 *Mar 27, 1995Sep 3, 1996The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyUnderwater vehicle and combination directional control and cable interconnect device
US5551365 *Mar 27, 1995Sep 3, 1996The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyWater vehicle and a directional control means therefor
US6220906 *Oct 4, 1999Apr 24, 2001The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyMarine propulsion assembly
US6269763 *Nov 23, 1999Aug 7, 2001Richard Lawrence Ken WoodlandAutonomous marine vehicle
US6923105 *Oct 6, 2003Aug 2, 2005The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyGun-armed countermeasure
US7026540 *Apr 4, 2005Apr 11, 2006The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyTailcone assembly for a submarine countermeasure
US7204197 *Nov 3, 2005Apr 17, 2007The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The NavyMast wake reduction by shaping
WO2005000667A2 *Mar 5, 2004Jan 6, 2005De Cicco Daniel JCompact, controllabel towed vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification114/20.1, 114/338, 114/333, 89/37.6, 114/340, 114/23, 114/319
Cooperative ClassificationF42B19/00