Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1297112 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 11, 1919
Filing dateApr 24, 1918
Priority dateApr 24, 1918
Publication numberUS 1297112 A, US 1297112A, US-A-1297112, US1297112 A, US1297112A
InventorsJames S Dayton
Original AssigneeJames S Dayton
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rail sawing and punching machine.
US 1297112 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L S. DAYTON. BAIL SRWiNG AND PUNCHING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 24,19l8.

Patented Mar. 11 1919.

6 SHEETS-SHEET I.

awve/wtoc fia yfwz Wag J. S. DAYTON. RAIL SAWING AND PUNCHING MACHINE.

AFPLICATION FILED APR. 24, 1918.

Pateilted Mar. 11,1919.

s SHEETS-SHEET 2.

J. S. DAYTON. RAiL SAWING AND PUNCHING MACHINE.

1 r1! m Ln I I. M Q m I hm Kw RAH d 1 Wi l mm APPLICATION FILED APR. 24.1918.

m H! W ggl MIA 351, my {WWW J. S. DAYTON. RAIL SAWING AND PU-NCHING MACHINE.

APPLICATION HL'ED APR. 24 I'9I8.

Patented Mar. 11, 1919.-

6 SHEETS-SHEET 4- ll ll.

ll- 2 r511 I A "II J. S. DAYTON. RAIL SAWING AND PUNCHING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 24,19l8. 1,297,1 12.

6 SHEETS-SHEET 5.

Gum/M1 Patented Mar. 11, 1919.

J S. DAYTON.

-RA1LSAW|NG AND PUNCHING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 24.19l8.

Patented Mar. 11,1919.

6 SHEETS-SHEETS.

awuemtoz b a/i266 6717? witmmao Z W/ STATES PATENT @FEQE.

JAMES S. DAYTON, OF CUMBERLAND, MARYLAND.

RAIL SAWING AND PUNCHING MACHINE.

Application filed April 24, 1918.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that 1, JAMES S. DAYTON, a citizen of the United States, residing at Cumberland, in the county of Allegany and State of Maryland, have invented new and useful Improvements in Rail Sawing and Punching Machines, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to rail punching and sawing machines, the broad object in view being to produce a machine which will simultaneously saw rail stock intorequiredlengths and concurrently punch bolt holes in the adjacent rail ends.

A further object of the invention is to pro vide 1n connectlon with such a machine, means for simultaneously advancing the sawing and punching means toward the rail and the rail toward said sawing and punching means.

A further object in view is to provide means operating 'automatically to arrest the feeding movement of the rail stock just prior to the sawing and punching operations.

Another object in view is to provide means for automatically throwing the sawing and punching means out of operation; also to provide means for manually tripping and throwing the sawing and punching means into operation. Y

Another object of the invention is to provide means whereby series of punching members may be brought into action; also to provide means for automatically clamping the rail stock preparatory to the sawing and punching operations.

With the above and other ob ects 1n view, the mvent1on conslsts 1n the construction,

combination and arrangement of parts, as

herein described, illustrated and claimed.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 IS a plan view of the machlne.

2 is an end. view thereof partly v broken away in section, showing the sawing and punchlng members in their inactive positions.

Fig. 3 is a vertical cross sectionthrough I the machine. taken in line wlth the main drivingshaft.

Fig. 4: is'a fragmentary vertical section showing the clutching means for throwing the sawing and punching meansinto and out of operation. I Fig. is a fragmentaryvertical section showing the manually controlled means for tripping and releasing the clutching means Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Mar. 11, 1919.

Serial No. 230,525.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary vertical cross section through the bearing head of Fig. 6, showing the manually operable means for imparting a partial rotative movement to the punch carrying block, also the locking means for said block.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary horizontal section through the same.

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary horizontal section through the lower portion of Fig. 6,

showing the means for adjusting and lock ing the die block.

Fig. 11 is a detached sectional view showing the saw mandrel in elevation and the parts adjacent thereto in longitudinal section.

Fig. 12 is a detail perspective view showing the jointed connection between the saw mandrel and the saw clamping sleeve.

Fig. 13 is a cross section on the line 1313 of Fig. 11.

Fig. 1 1 is a cross section on the line l t-14 of Fig. 11.

Fig. 15 is a plan view of one of the strippers and the operating lever thereof.

Fig. 16 is a fragmentary section showing the means for fastening one of the punchers to the punch block.

Fig. 17 is a cross section through the bottom portion of the machine, showing the rail supporting means and the raising and lowering means therefor.

Fig. 18 is afragmentary horizontal section through the same, illustrating the guiding means for the rail supporting means shown in the preceding figure.

The frame of the improved rail sawing and punching machine comprises a base 1 above which is arranged the main bed or table 2 of the machine, said bed being arranged at a suitable elevation above the base to admit of the arrangement beneath said bed'of the dies and operating mechanism therefor to be hereinafter described. 'The bed or table 2. is formed, as shown in Figs.

ear-1a G'With a longitudinal. slot or guide way 3 therein along which the rail stock 1 indicated by dotted lines in Fig. 6 1s movable as said rail stock is received from the rolling mill. Located at opposite sides of the front portion of the machine and the bed or table, are parallel I beams 5, (see Figs. 6 and 12), and mounted upon and extending upwardly from said 1 beams are vertical guides 6, the inner faces of which are grooved or formed with guide ways 7, as shown in Fig. 18 to receive and guide the opposite upstanding side portions 8 of a pair of bearing members 9 which are thus slidable vertically between the guides 63.

Each of the bearing members 8 carries a horizontal shaft 10 upon I which are mounted rail supporting rollers 11 suitably flanged to engage and support the rail stock or rail shown at 12, said rail lying upon its side and the head and base thereof being supported by the rollers 11 as the rail stock is fed into the sawing and punching machine. The rollers 11 are adjustable longitudinally of the shaft 10 and are held adjust-ed by means of stop collars or nuts 13 threaded on the shaft 10. The bearing members 9 are raised and lowered by means of rock shafts 14:, each of which is connected with the respective bearing member by means of a link 15 pivotally connected at one end to the bearing member 9 and having its other end connected to a crank 16 of the rock shaft 14-. The means for operating the rock shafts 14.- will be hereinafter described. The object in raising the rail stock 12 is to elevate the same to the proper position for action by the rail cutting saw and the punches hereinafter referred to, and furthermore, to arrest the forward or feed ing movement of the rail stock as it passes through the sawing and punching machine the rail stock being ordinarily driven by feed rollers and the elevating supporting rollers 11 serving to lift the rail out of engagement with said feeding rollers, thereby stopping the rail in position to be sawed and punched.

Arranged above the bed 2 and extending parallel to the slot or guide way 3 therein is a saw mandrel 17, the same being journaled in a vertically movable head or housing 18 as best illustrated in Figs. 2 and 6. The upper portion of the housing 18 is slidable up and down in a guideway or rabbet 19 formed internally in the lower end of a stationary plunger guide head 20 as shown in Fig. 6, the head or housing 18 being secured by fastening means to a vertically movable plunger 21 which, together with the housing 18 and the mandrel 17 and the parts carried thereby, is counterbalanced by means of a weighted arm 22 carrying an adjustable counterbalanced weight 24': and supported pivot-ally at on an arm 26 e1:- tending from the top of the plunger guiding head 20 as shown in Fig. 2, the inner end of said lever having a curved portion or hook 27 which extends through an eye 28 at the top of the plunger 21.

Motion is transmitted to the plunger 21 by the following mechanism. 29 represent-s a plunger operating lever which ismounted pivotally at 30 between the ends thereof between side portions 31 of the machine frame. Where the lever 29 connects with the plunger 21, it carries upper and lower triangular bearing pieces 32 which are connected by side yokes 3e journaled upon studs or pintles 35 extending laterally from the adjacent end of the lever 29. The plunger 21 is formed with a recess 36 having i-shaped bearing sockets 3? which receive the correspondingly formed extremities of the bearing members This provides for the up and down movements of the plunger 21 under the operation of the lever 29. As shown in Fi g. 3, the lever 29 has pivotally attached to its opposite end links 38 which at their lower ends are journaled upon a crank pin 39 extending between and terminally fastened to oppositely located gears 40 which are in constant mesh with underlying gears -11 on a shaft 42 journaled in the side frame members 31. Each of the gears 40 is mounted upon a separate and independent stud shaft 43 journaled in one of the side frame pieces 31. The shaft 42 is rotatably driven by means of a large gear 4:1 which is normally loose on said shaft 42 but adapted to be thrown into driving engage ment thereto by means of a slidable clutch t5, the operation of which will be described. Motion is imparted to the gear 1 1 by means of a pinion 46 faston the main driving shaft 47 of the machine. The shaft 4E7 is ournaled in the side frame pieces 31 as shown in Fig. 3 and is driven by means of a belt, (not shown), adapted to engage fast and loose pulleys 4:8 and 4-9 respectively, the shaft :7 also having a flying wheel 50 thereon. The shaft 47 is also additionally supported upon and journaled in posts 51 arranged laterally of the main frame of the machine.

The clutch 4:5 is normally held in the position shown in Figs. 3 and l by means of a weighted arm and mounted i' so upon the outer end of a shaft or stem 53 movable longitudinally within acentral bore 54 of the shaft 42 above referred to as shown in at. A pin or key 55 extends through the shaft or stem and also through diametrically opposite longitudinal slots 56 in the shaft $2, the pin or key 55. being movable lengthwise of the slots 56 in order that the teeth of the clutch to may be thrown into and out of engagement with other teeth of a. clutch face 5'7 on the outer side of the large gear as. The pin or key 55 passes through and is secured to the hub of a cam faced collar 58 which is slidable on the shaft 42 and which is normally pressed in an inward direction or toward the center of the machine by means of a shifting fork 59 which is pivotally connected at 60 to a ring 61 working loosely in a oove in the periphery of the collar 58. he shifting fork 59 is ivotally mounted at 62 on the machine rame and is connected by a pivot 63 to a weightedbell crank lever 64 pivotally mounted at 65 on a bracket arm 66 extending from the machine frame. The weighted arm 64 thu tends to press the cam faced collar 58 inwardly where it engages a roller 67 journaled on a stud 68 projecting'la'terally from the shaft 42. The-position of the parts illustrated in Fig. 3 is that assumed by said parts just prior to tripping the mechanism which sets in operation the plunger 21 and causes the same to move downwardly to perform the sawing and punching operations on the rail stock. In such position, the roller 67 is engaged with the highest point of the cam faced collar 58 as shown in Fig. 3,,so that when the roller 67 is moved out of engagement with said cam faced collar, the latter is free to move inwardly under the influence of the weighted arm 64, thereby throwing the clutch 62 into engagement with the large gear 44, looking the latter to the shaft 42, whereupon motion is imparted to said shaft 42 through the pinion 46 to the gear 44.

The means for moving the roller 67 out of engagement with the camfaoed collar 58 is illustrated in Figs. 1, 2, 5 and 6, wherein it will be observed that I employ a foot lever 69, which is pivotally mounted at 70 on the machine frame and has pivotally connected thereto the lower end of a substantially vertical rod 71, (see Fig. 2), the latter extending upwardly and being pivotally connected at 72 to toggle links 73, (see Fig. 5), one toggle link being anchored at 74 to the frame and the other toggle link bein pivotally connected at 75 to a longitudina ly movable rod 76 on which the roller 67 is journaled. The rod 76 passes through a fixed guide 77 and the roller 67 is normally held in the path of the cam faced collar 58 by means of a compression spring 78, one end portion 7 of which is seated in a socket 79 in the guide 77. By the means just described, the operator by pressing on the pedal endof the trip lever 69, may displace the roller 67 and, thereby release the cam faced collar 58, resulting in throwing the clutch 45 into ongagement with the gear 44 for the purpose above described, or in other words to set the sawing and punching operation. After one complete operation, the gear 44 has about 8 completed one revolution, whereupon the cam faced collar 58 acts against the roller 67 which has been returned-to its normal 7 position by the spring 78 and thereby throws the clutch 45 out of engagement with the gear 44, terminating, for the time being, the operation of the sawing and punching mechanism. This enables the operator to accurately position the rail stock before throwing the sawing and punching mechanism into operation.

The weighted arm 52 swings by gravity to the lowest point, at which time, the highest point of the cam faced collar 53 rests against the roller 67 thereby holding out the clutch 45, the machine being then at rest.

Referring now more particularly to Figs. 6 and 11, the saw mandrel is made in two sections 17 and 17, the same being connected together end to end by reducing and threading the end portion of the section 17 as shown at 80 and correspondingly boring and threading the adjacent end of the section 17 This is done in order that the mandrel section 17 may be removed endwise in order to apply and remove the saw indicated at 81. The mandrel section 17 is in the main of larger diameter than the section 157 and is reduced to form an annular bearing shoulder 82, (see Fig. 11). Against the shoulder 82 rests a saw clamping head section 83. Bearing against the'opposite face of the saw blade 81 is another head section 84 which surrounds the mandrel section 17 The saw blade 81 is clamped between the 95 head sections 83 and 84 and is formed with holes to receive dowel pins or studs 85 which project from one of the clamping head sections into corresponding sockets 86 in the other head section as shown in Fig. 11. This forms a positive connection between the clamping head sections and the saw blade. The mandrel sections 17 and 17 have fastened thereto belt pulleys 87, (see Fig. 6), there being two of such belt pulleys arranged adjacent to the opposite ends of and about equi-distantly from the saw 81. The driving belts 88 from the pulleys 87 extend around pulleys 89, (see Fig. 1), on the opposite ends of acountershaft 90 jo-urnaled in bearings on the main frame of the machine, and carrying other pulleys 91 from which driving-belts 92 extend around pulleys 93 on the main driving shaft 47, (see Figs. 1 and By the means just described, rotary motion is imparted to the saw mandrel 17, 17. I a

The saw mandrel is mounted in stationary ornon-rotary tubular housings 94 having enlarged and recessed inner end portions 95 in which are arranged anti-friction bearing rollers 96 for the sections of the mandrel as shown inFig. 11. The bearing rollers 96 at one side of the saw- 81 revolve around and upon a clamping sleeve 97 surrounding the mandrel section 17 within the adjacent tubular housing 94. The inner end of the clamping sleeve 97 is normally forced tightly against theadjacent saw clamping head section 84 in order to, in turn, force said head section tightly against the saw 81. At its outer end, the clamping sleeve 97, (see Figs. 11 and 12), is formed with notches or key ways 98 to receive a pin or key 99 which passes through a longitudinal slot 100 in the saw mandrel section 17. A nut 101 is threaded upon said mandrel section 17 and serves to press the pin or key 99 intothe notches 98 of the clamping sleeve, thereby locking the clamping sleeve to the mandrel section 17 so as to rotate with the latter. By turning the nut 101 inwardly it acts to force the clamping sleeve 97 against the adjacent saw clamping head section 81 for the purpose above stated. By loosening the nut 101, the sleeve 97 and the clamping head section 87 may be moved toward the nut 101 and away from the saw 81 to release the lat ter, then when the mandrel section 17 is withdrawn in endwise direction, the saw 81 may be removed from the mandrel. Said saw may be replaced by reversing the oper ation just described. This enables the saw to be sharpened or replaced by another saw. The clamping sleeve 97 is connected to the mandrel section 17 by a key or feather 102 (see Fig. 13). The saw clamping head sections 83 and 81 are also feathered to the reduced end of the mandrel section 17 as shown at 103, (see Fig. 14).

In order to admit of the removal of the saw mandrel, the housing 18 is provided with displaceable end sections 10-1, as shown in Fig. 6, each of said end sections being connected pivotally at 105 to the main section of the housing 18 and being held in the normal position shown in Fig. 6 by means of detachable pins 106. Each of the end sections 101 has inserted therein, a threaded bearing screw 107, the inner end of which bears against the adjacent extremity of the mandrel. 0n the outer end of each of the bearing screws 17 is an adjacent hand wheel 108. In this way, end thrust of the mandrel is prevented and at the same time, provision is made for removing the mandrel in an end wise direction.

The housing or head 18 is detachably fas tened to the plunger 21 by the means best illustrated in Figs. 2 and 6 wherein it will be observed that the lower end of the plun ger 21 is formed with laterally open slots 109 to receive a horizontal row of bolts 110, the upper portions of the slots 109 being enlarged as shown at 111 to receive the heads of said bolts 110. After said bolts are inserted in the lower end of the plunger 21, the housing or head 18 is moved upwardly until said bolts project through holes 112 in the head or housing 18 whereupon nuts 113 are threaded on said bolts, the nuts being introduced through slots 111 in said head or housing. By the same means the head or housing 18 may be disconnected from the plunger 21 when necessary.

The tubular housings 91 are supported at a plurality of points by bearings 115 within the head or housing 18 as shown inFigs. 6 and 7, each of said bearings 115 having a detachable section or cap portion 116. The housing 18 is formed in the front thereof with an opening 117 sufliciently large to admit of the insertion and removal of the saw mandrel and the parts immediately associated therewith. 1

Surrounding the non-rotary tubular housings 9 1 are punch carrying blocks 118, as shown in Fig. 6, there being two of such die blocks arranged one at each side of the saw 81. Each of the die blocks 118 carries a plurality of annular series of punches 119, said punches being arranged in longitudinal rows as shown in Fig. 6, three of such punches being shown in each row with respect to each punching block 118 where three bolt holes are required to be formed through the web of each rail end. The number of punches may, of course, be increased or diminished in accordance with the number of bolt holes required. Each of the punches 119 is secured to the punch block 118 as shown in Fig. 16, each punch 119 having a dove-tailed shape 120 which is received in a correspondingly shaped recess 121 in the block 118 and held in proper position by shims or spacing pieces 122. The base 120 is formed separately from the punch proper as shown in Fig. 16 and is formed with a threaded shank 123 to which the respective punch 119 is tightly secured by means of a nut or union 128. Each row of punches is held at one end of the block by an end flange 12 1 at the inner end of said block and after all of the punches and shims have been,

properly assembled, a clamping ring 125 is secured to the outer end of the block 118 by fastening means 126 as best shown in Fig. 16. This enables all of the punches to be properly alined with the dies hereinafter described. In connection with the bottom active row of punches of each block 118, I employ a stripper 127, one of said strippers being shown in Fig. 15. The body of each stripper is formed with transversely elongated slots 128 through which the punches project and each stripper is secured by fastening means 129 to a lever 130 which is pivotally mounted at 131'0n an arm or bracket 132 extending upwardly from the bed 2 of V mitting compressedair to the cylinder 135, the piston therein may be pressed upwardly thereby stripping and cleaning the punches from adhering material. The spring 137 adbetween a wall 139 of the housing or head.

l8 and the peripheries of the punch carryin blocks 118. The braces 138-have enlarged heads 140 as shown in Fig. 2 which are adapted to be'slid into and out of slots or guideways of corresponding shape in the housing and moved inwardly to the position shown in Fig. 6 where theyare held by set screws 141 inserted through said head or housing. V

Each of the punch carrying blocks 118 is adapted to be turned around the respective tubular housing 94 by the means best illustrated in Fig. 8, consistin of a thumb latch lever 142, the latch 143 0 which is adapted to engage a single notch 144 in a fixed segment 145. The lever 142 is j ournaled on the tubular housing 94 and carries a spring pressed pin 146 which engages a ratchet face 147 having afixed connection with the adja cent end of the respective die block118, (see Figs. 6 and 8), so that by rocking the lever 142, said die block 118 may be turned to bring another set of dies 118 into working position. Each die block is held'locked in proper position by means of a pin 148 as shown in Fig. 9, which pin is normally pressed into engagement with a socket 149 in the adjacent end of the pnnchblock 118 by means of a compression spring 150. The locking pin 148 is moved out of engagement with the punch block by means of a lever 151 pivotally mounted on the head or housing 18, the inner end of said lever engaging the locking pin as shown in Fig.9. .The lever 151 comprises a pivoted extension 152 adapted to be thrown to an out of the way or non-obstructing position as shown in said Fig. 9, the two sections of saidlever having abutting shoulders 153 and 154 which bear against each other to affect an outward movementof the lockin pin 148.

Located under the be or table 2 are two pivotally mounted bearing frames 155, the

same being pivotally mounted for independent movement at their inner ends as shown at 156 in Fig. 2. Each of said bearing members 155 has journaled therein one of a pair of die block supporting shafts 157, (see Fig. 6) and upon each of saidshafts is mounted for turning movement a die block 158 each carrying a plurality of annular series of dies 159 for cotiperation with the punches 119 above described. The dies 159 are mounted upon their respective blocks in a manner similar to the mounting of the punches upon their blocks as previously described and as illustrated in Fig. 6, and are secured in place by practically the same means. I also employ substantially the same means as described in connection with the punch blocks for adjusting and locking the die blocks 158, said means being best illustrated in Fig. 10, wherein it will be seen that I use a thumb latch lever 160 carrying a pawl which engages a ratchet wheel 161 fast on the outer end of the adjacent shaft 157, said mechanism being used for partially turning the shaft 157 and the die block carried thereby. In conjunction with each die block 158, I use a locking pin 162 which is movable into and out of a socket 163 in the die block, being yieldably held in locking position by means of a compression spring 164. A lever 165, (see Fig. 10), is pivotally mounted between its ends at 166 and has a forked inner end portion which en gages a grooved collar 167 slidable on the shaft 157 and which carries the locking pm 162. This enables a new set of dies to be brought into working position and the die block locked in such position.

The means for raising and lowering the die blocks consists of a pair of raising and lowering members 168 each of which is substantially wedge shaped or provided with an inclined upper surface as shown in Fig. 2. Each of the members 168 is normally held in the lowering position shown in Fig. 2 by means of a compression spring 169 which surrounds a guiding stem 170 movable in. a guideway 171 in the frame of the ma-- chine. Each of the members 168 hasan upstanding front portion 172 connected by a stem or rod 173 to a piston 174, mounted for reciprocatory movement in a compressed. air cylinder 175 formed in the machine frame and to which compressed air is admitted by a valve 17 6 having a relief nozzle or outlet 177. By admitting compressed air behind the piston 174, the latter is moved out- I wardly thereby causing the respective memher 168 to raise the superimposed bearing member 155 above referred to.

In the upward movementof each bearing member 155, movement is imparted to a rail ing portion 172 of the adjacent raising and lowering member 168 as clearly shown in Fig. 2. Each of the rail clamps 178 has a dovetailed sliding connection with a fixed guide 182 as shown by dotted lines in Fig. 6, sa d 'uide being of corresponding formation. n conjunction with each automatically shifted rail clamp 1'48, 1 us a normally stationary rail clamp 18-3 which, how ever, is adjustable to suit th size of the raildie providing the same with a threaded stem 18% which is movable through a guide 185 and held fixed in its adjustment by means of nuts 186 threaded on said stem and bearing against opposite sides or" the guide 185, (see Fig. 2).

Extending laterally from each of the members 168 is a bail shaped projection 187 which receives and engages the hooked end 188 of a lever 189 which is fulcrumed to turn on a vertical axis on a snort post 190 ex tending upwardly from the base of the frame. Each lever 189 works through a slot 191 in the side wall of the base as shown in Fig. 6 and has a cam face 192 which on gages a roller 193 on the free end of an arm 19% extending laterally from the rock shaft 1% hereinabove described and shown in Fig. 17 which rock shaft is used for the purpose or raising and lowering the rail supporting rollers 11. Thus as the dies are raised to their working position, the rail 12 is also raised out of contact with the driving or feeding rollers therefor, tne rail is brought to a stop, 11 simultaneously the clamps 1T8 are brought into clamping engagement with the rail, holding the rail fixed. Concurrently the punches are lowered to their working positions and the saw 81 is also advanced to perform its work of cutting the rail into. The sawing and punching mechanism are tripped and thrown into operation by depressing the pedal end of the foot operated lever 69 as hereinabove described. As soon as the sawing and punching operations have been completed, the gear ll having completed one revolution, the clutch :5 is thrown out and the operation of the machine is temporarily suspended 'ith the exception, of course, that the saw mandrel and the saw mounted thereon continue to be driven. The operator has ample time to properly position and the length oi rail being sawed from the stock and when this has been done, a simple downward pressure on the foot operated lever, sets the sawing and punching mechanism into full operation.

1 claim 1. in a rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a rail cutting saw, a rail punch, and means for concurrently advancing the rail supporting means toward the saw and punch and also advancing the saw and punch toward the rail supporting means.

In a rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a. rail cutting saw. a rail punch, means for advancing the rail supporting means and rail to the action of said saw and punch, and means for automatically clamping the rail prior to the operation of the saw and punch.

in a rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a. rail cutting saw, a rail punch, means for ad-- vancing the rail supporting means and rail to the action of the saw and punch, and railteeding means automatically rendered in effective when the rail is so advanced.

at. In a rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supportingmeans, a rail cutting saw, a rail punch, means for advancing the rail su ortin means and rail 0 the action of said saw and ounch, said ail-sup imrting means embodying a rail supporting roller, and raising and lowering means for said roller.

5. In a rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a rail cutting saw, a rail punch, means for advancing the rail supporting means and rail to the action of said saw and punch, and a rotary mandrel for said saw, the punch being supported by and shiftable with said mandrel.

6. In a rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a rail cutting saw, mandrel on which said saw is mounted, a punch block journaled on said mandrel, an annular series of punches carried by said block, and means for turning said blocl: to present any punch to the work.

7. in rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a rail cutting saw, a mandrel on which said saw is mounted, a punch block ournaled on said mandrel, an annular series of punches carried by said block, means for turning said block to present any punch to the work, and means for locking said punch block from turning.

8. In rail sawing and punching machine,

the combination of rail supporting means,a rail cutting saw, a rail punch, a mandrel on which said saw and punch are mounted, a bearing head in which said mandrel is journaled, and means for advancing and retracting said bearing head in relation to the work.

9. In a rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a rail cutting saw, a rail punch, a mandrel on which said saw and punch are mounted, a bearing head in which said mandrel is ournaled, means for advancing and retracting said bearing head in relation to the work, the last named means comprising a reciprocatory plunge-rte which the bearing head is attached, a rotary shaft, a rock-lever actuated by said shaft and operatively connected with said bearing head, and means for driving said shaft.

10. In a rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a rail cutting saw, a rail punch, a mandrel on which said saw and punch are mounted, a bearing head in which said man drel is journaled, means for advancing and Cir retracting said bearing head in relation to the work, the last named means comprising a reciprocatory plunger to which the bearing head is attached, a rotary shaft, a rocklever actuated by said shaft and operatively connected with said bearing head, means for driving said shaft, and automatically operated clutch means for throwing said shaft out of operation after each sawing and punching operation.

11. In a railsawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a rail cutting saw, a rail punch, 'a mandrel on which said saw and punch aremounted, abearing head in which said mandrel is journaled, means for advancing and retracting said bearing head in relation to the work, the last named means comprising a reciprocatory plunger to which the bearin head is attached, a rotary shaft, a rockever actuated by said shaft and operatively connected with said bearing head, means for driving said shaft, automatically operated clutch means for throwing said shaft out of operation after each sawing and punching operation, and manually controlled means for shifting said clutch means to clutching position.

12. In a rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a rail cutting saw, a rail punch, a mandrel on which said saw and punch are mounted, a bearing head in which said mandrel is journaled, means for advancing and retracting said bearing head in relation to the work, the last named means comprising a reciprocatory plunger to which the bearing head is attached, a rotary shaft, a rock-lever actuated by said shaft and operatively connected with said bearing head, means for driving said shaft, automatically operated clutch means for throwing said shaft out of operation after each sawing and punching operation, manually controlled means for shifting said clutch means to clutching position, and means for automatically setting the clutch means in position for prompt action upon the actuation of said 'manually controlled means. i

13. In a rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a rail cutting saw, a rail punch, means for advancing the rail supporting means and rail to the action of said saw and punch, a die located on the opposite side of the work from the punch, and means for advancing the die toward the punch and work concurrently with the advance of the saw and punch.

14. In a rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a rail cutting saw, a rail punch, means for advancing the rail supporting means and railto the action of said saw and punch, a die block located on the opposite side of the work from the punch, an annular series of dies carried by said block, a shaft on which said block is journaled, manually operable means for turning said block, a bearing frame in which said shaft is ournaled, and means for automatically shifting said bearing frame toward and away from the punch.

15. In a rail sawing and punching machine, the combination of rail supporting means, a rail cutting saw, a rail punch, means for advancing the rail supporting means and rail to the action of said saw and punch, a die block located on the opposite side of the work from the punch, an

annular series of dies carried by said block, a shaft on which said block is journaled, manually operable means for turning said block, a bearing frame in which said shaft is journaled, means for locking and releasing said die block, and means for automatically shifting said bearing frame toward and away from the punch.

In testimony whereof I afiix mv signature.

JAMES S. DAYTON.

Copies of this patent may be obtained for five cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D. G.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4873902 *Apr 7, 1988Oct 17, 1989Krieg Adrian HRailroad rail cold saw
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/34.00R, 269/47, 269/32, 269/238, 83/549, 83/552, 269/243
Cooperative ClassificationB21D53/00