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Publication numberUS1301995 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 29, 1919
Filing dateNov 4, 1916
Priority dateNov 4, 1916
Publication numberUS 1301995 A, US 1301995A, US-A-1301995, US1301995 A, US1301995A
InventorsGuy Arthur
Original AssigneeGuy Arthur
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric water-heater.
US 1301995 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. ARTHUR. ELECTRIC WATER HEATER. APPLICATION FILED NOV. 4, 191a.

Patented Apr. 29, 1919.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 1- Patented Apr. 29, 1919.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 [N V EN TOR.

A TTORNE YS.

G. ARTHUR! ELECTRIC WATER HEATER. APPLICATION FILED NOV. 4. 1916.

- UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

GUY ARTHUR, OF RITZVILLE, WASHINGTON.

ELECTRIC WATER-HEATER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Apr. 29, 1919.

Application filed November 4, 1916. Serial No. 129,485.

which the following is a specification.

mg purposes.

he invention relates to improvements in t at class of water heaters which are not only electrically operated but which are tank.

Within the foregoing scope, it is a feature of my invention to employ an electric heater device which is adapted to extend about the periphery of the .tank to an extent less than the total circumference thereof, means being employed for not only attaching said heater device at any desired elevation along the tank, but also, at any desired circumferential position with respect to the tank. By this means, I am able to attach the heater to the tank irrespective of any difficulties of inaccessibility which may result from location of a tank in a corner, or in such proximity to the stove and piping as would render it otherwise inaccessible tachment of such a device. the application of heat to a portion of the circumference of the tank serves to set up or initiate cycles of heat circulation of the contents in such a manner as not to apreciably affect that portion of the contents below the heater as would be the case if the heater extended completely cumference of contents above the heater being of course raised to a higher temperature. By this means, I am able to quickly heat a small portion of the contents of the tank where the full volume is not desired. adjustability of the heater device circumferentially of the tank, I am able to free the sediment that would otherwise accumulate if heat were always applied to one portion of the tank.

A further feature of my invention resides in a novel means for attaching the heater to the tank, said 1 means comprising a hand between which and the tank' the heater device is interposed, and along which the Furthermore,

mprovemlents in Electric Water-Heaters, h

applied externally on the for the at- Because of the heater device is adjustable circumferentially of the tank independently of any adustment of the band.

y invention is particularly designed for application to water heating tanks which device may be circumferentially adjusted to vide a single type of device which may be adjusted to fit the stock sizes of all tanks now put on the market. Thus my invention involves the novel feature of providing may also be lengthened or shortened 1n accordance with the diameter of tanks to which it is applied.

y invention has many other features and objects which will be more fully described in connection with the accompanying drawings and which will be more particularly pointed out in and by the appended claims. I

In the drawings igure 1 is a horizontal sectional view of a water heating tank showing a device of my invention applied thereto.

Fig. 2 is a face view of my novel coupling located adjacent the rivet seam.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged face view of that 2 portion of the band diametrically opposite the coupled ends shown in Fig. 2, illustrating the manner in which the band may be lengthened or shortened to fit tanks of different diameter, the adjustable terminals bein unconnected.

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3 showing the adjustable ends connected to provide a band of the maximum length.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view on line 5-5 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a sectional view on line 6-6 of Fig. 8 showing a portion of the band and the manner in which a part of the insulation is connected therewith.

Fig.7 is a sectional view on line 7-7 of Fig. 8. 1

Fig. 8 is an inside view of the band with portions of the insulation broken away to show the manner in which it is secured to a sectional view on line 11--11 circulation set up or initiated as a result of the application of the heater to only a circumferential portion of the tank.

Like characters of reference designate similar parts throughout the different figures of the drawings.

As illustrated, 1 designates a water tank 2 and 3 arranged in one section being indicated at 5 and the other section indicated at 6. Said band may be in the form of an initially flat strip of metal and at the rivet seam, I provide the band sections with coupling terminals or ends which I will now describe in detail with reference to Figs. 1 and 2.

In view of the fact that both sections are identical in formation, as regards their coupling terminals, only one need be described in detail. Section broadly indicated at 5, has an intermediate portion which is adapted to extend along the periphery of the tank 1 and is bent up to form aterminal 8. The remainder of the part 7 is bent back, as indicated at 9, and is secured at 10 to part 7 by rivets. Thus this bent back part will not only strengthen the band sec tion itself but stiffen and support the terminal 8. Section 6 has corresponding parts 11, 12, 13 and 14. Adjacent terminal 8, the bent back end 9 is provided with slots 15,

and corresponding slots 16 are formed in the bent back portion 13. These slots provide for insertion of'stove bolts 17, there being two in number, and the slots also provide for manipulating the heads 18 and nuts 19, by suitable implements, to tighten the band.

From the foregoing description it will be seen that I have provided coupling means which not only spans the rivet seam but which also-holds the band in tight relation against the tank.

Reference will next be made to that feature of my invention whereby the band may be lengthened or shortened to fit tanks of different diameter.

Referring to Figs. 3 and 4, it will be seen that section 5 is provided with tongues 20 and 21, the central tongue 20 being longitudinally advanced and projecting beyond the lateral or side tongues 21. Section 6 is provided with sets of slots 22 and 23, and a set designated at 24 and 25, the slots 22 and 24 being disposed with respect to the slots 23 and 25 in a relation similar to the relation or disposition of the tongue 20 to the tongues'21. In Fig. manner in which the adjusting terminals are connected together, section 5 over-lapping section 6 and the tongues 20 and 21 being inserted through slots 22 and 23 and folded back against section 6, as also illustrated in Fig. 5. The connection shown in Fig. 4 is that which will be made to impart to the band its greatest len h. If the tongues 20 and 21 were inserted in slots 24 and 25, the band would have a shorter length and the section 6 may have as many sets of slots as desired. An important feature of this part of the structure is that I avoid rivets or any threaded connection and thereby provide a band which can be stamped out of sheet metal. It will be understood that after a heating device has been applied to a tank of a given size, it will not be necessary to subsequently disturb the adjusting connection made, and therefore, the ton es 20 and 21 will not be subjected to suc frequent bending stress as would tend to break and weaken the metal thereof. Furthermore, it will be seen that the tongues are bent inwardly and are held in tight relation against the heater insulation, as shown in Fig. 5, so that tension stress cannot act to separate the tongue from the locked connection shown.

Reference will next be made to my improved heating device which is held in contact with the periphery of the tank throughout a portion of the circumference of the latter.

That portion of the heating device which directly engages the tank comprises a strip of insulation, which may be mica, and which is indicated at 26. Next outermost from the 4, I have shown the mica 26, is a coil core of insulating material, such as mica, and indicated at 27, which is also a flat strip of material. The coil core will be appreciably the same. length as the tank engaging insulation 26. Wound around the coil core 26 is the heating coil 28 and I preferably notch the margins of core 27, as indicated at 29, so that the convolutions of the heating coil 28 will be flush with the edges of the core 27. One end of the heating coil, as indicated at 30, extends along the top of the heating device toward a connection which I will indicate broadly as 31, and which I have not shown in detail, but the same in practice will be of any suitable character to facilitate connection of supply wires. The remaining end 32, of the heating coil, extends toward the connection 31, as indicated more particularly at 39. On the outer side of the heating coil is disposed a strip of insulating material having as a primary purpose the retention or insulation against radiation outwardly of the heat from the coil, the same also acting to electrically insulate the coil from metallic parts of the band, this strip being preferably of asbestos and being indicated at 33.

The foregoing comprises the heating device or element per se, and these parts are suitably coupled together by any desired means such for instance as rivets 34 distributed at suitable distances lengthwise of the device. By reference to Fig. 1, it will be seen that this device peripherally engages the tank throughout a distance less than the circumference of the tank. Interposed between the band and the heating device is a foundation strip of insulating material, s'uchras asbestos, and which is indicated at 35. a

It is a. feature of this invention to adjustably mount the heating device on the band so that the heating device may be circumferentially adjusted lengthwise of the band to occupy any desired position on either side of the rivet. seam. It is because of the fact the heater is shortened in length with respect the circumference of the tank that I am able to realize this feature of adjusting the heater to any convenient circumferential position for installation, and also for the purpose of freeing sediment accumulations resulting from long usage of the heater against one portion of the ta k.

As illustrated, 36 designates a clip which extends vertically along the outside face of insulation 33, said clip being fixed to the heating device by ny suitable means such as rivets 37, which are shown extendin through the clip 36, the outer insulation 33, the coil core 27 and the inner insulation 26. The band sections 5 and 6 are somewhat wider than the heatin device and said band sections may be provifed on their lower mar:

gins with aplurality of notches 38. One end of the clip 36 is bent beneath the foundatlon insul'ation 35, as indicated at 39, and said end is bent back against the outside face of the band, as indicated at 40, the slot 38 accommodating the end 40. The upper end of clip 36 is sub-divided to provide a support,'upstanding, for the connection 31, two outside clips 42 which are bent back through upper notches 43 and against the band, and finally, ends 44 and 45 which are bent over the terminals 30 and 32, to hold the saline in position. As illustrated more clearly in Fig. 11, the extreme ends of the parts 44 and 45 extend down between insulation 33 y 36 of the clip. Thus it may be seen that all of the wiring is mounted upon the heating device and therefore the heating device may be circumferentially adj usted along the band, and about the tank, to engage different circumferential areas of the latter, this being possible without disturbing the wiring connections.

I Will next describe the manner in which the foundation asbestos 35 is mounted upon the band sections, independently of the heating element, but in such a manner that it may be readily adjusted when the heating element is adjusted so as always to provide the required insulation backing between the heating element and the band, irrespective of the position of the former, on the latter.

eferring now to Figs. 6, 7, and 8, 46 designates a clip which extends vertically outside of the band and which is provided with lation 35. Said clip 46 is provided above and below with clip ends 47 and 48 which embrace insulation .35, these clip ends being outside ends. Central clip ends 49 and 50 number of clips 36 being also provided and being distributed as may be deemed necessa nitable plug connection may be made between t lent lighting or wall socket for supplying current, but as this is an obvious expedient, it will not be further referred to.

I will next refer to Fig. 12 to illustrate the advantages of my improved heater.

If it is desired to only heat a limited quantity of water, then the heater will be disposed in position A. Now, because of the fact that the heater only extends the circumference of the tank, there will be freedom for the contents when cycles of heating circulation are set up, as indicated at B. In other words, these cycles of heating movement will be'frec to com lete revolutions of movement toward and away from that area of the tank which is subjected to about a portion of heat. This would not be true if the heater sides of the rivet seams, an electric heater extended completely about the tank as in interposed between said band and tank at a that case the path of circulation of the heatpoint remote from said rivet seams, means ed water would be annularly upwardly and spanning said seain and coupling said ter- 5 then axially downwardly and the radial flow minal ends to tightly grip the band and 70 from the annular upward moving body of heater against the tank, and means for water toward the center of the tank would changing the length of said band for tanks collide in such opposing relation as to rather of different diameter to permit of disposing restrict than promote free cycles of movesaid terminal ends on opposite sides of said ment- This is especially important in view seam irrespective of the size of tank, sub- 75 of the fact that it has been determined by stantially as described. experiment that a suiiicient amount of heat 3. A heater for a rivet seamed Water tank can he applied by a segmental heater. Furcomprising in combination, a band having thermore, when the heater is disposed in poterminal ends adapted to be disposed on opsition A, that portion of the contents below posite sides of the rivet seam, an electric 80 line C- will not be heated until after that p01' heater of suflicient length to engage the petion above line C has been he e o a very riphery of the tank throughout a portion of high temperature. Position D would result the circumference thereof, said heater being in raising the temperature of a greater volinterposed between said band and tank and v ume of the contents, as indicated by do t being circumferentially adjustable along 85 line circulation E. said band, and means spanning said rivet Assuming that the heater had been located seams for connection with said terminal ends at osition F for a considerable time, then to tighten the band and hold said heater sediment accumulations might form as indii t, id t k i r ti e f th i mcated at G, on the interior of the tank abreast, ferential osition of the heater with respect 90 of the location of the :heater- I would to said band, substantially as described. merely be necessary to circumferentially 4. An electric heater for water tanks comjust the heater t0 POSltlOll H In OI dBI' 110i. rising combination, a, segmental heater only t0 f1'% such sediment accumulations but adapted fer engagement with a, portion of also increase efliciency of the heater y the circumference of the tank, and a band 95 taining heat transmission through an unolr ir lin th tank and having ou ling structed portion of the tank and allowmg means for tightening the band about the tank the s im G to P P and said heater, and said band having a det i desirable to locate the coupling vice for adjusting its length located opponection abreast of the rivet seam, as shown it id li an b t tiall as do- 100 in Fig. 1, but in the event that the tank was -fl d,

in a Corner and the Seam Portion was 11184? 5. A1i electric heater for water tanks comcessible, the coupling connection could be prising in combination, aheater adapted for made at an accessible point of the tanks engagement with a portion of the circum- 40 circumference and the segmental heater ference of the tank, and a band formed in 106 could be disposed far enough from the rivet two sections for encircling the heater and seam so that the latter would not hold the tank, said sections having a tongue and slot heater out of contact with the tank, thi adjustable terminals for adjustingthe length vantage being the direct result of a segmenf th b d, d id Sectlons h i couptal heater over an annular heater. ling terminals adapted to be united to 110 It is believed that he advantag and utiltighten the band about the tank, substanity of my invention will be clearly underti ll as d ib d, stood from the foregoing description and 6. As a means for heating water in a tank, while I have herein shown and descri ed a sectoral electric heater adapted to engage one specific form of my invention, I do not the periphery of the tank throughout a por- 115 wish to be limited thereto except for such tion of its circumference, a band engaging limitation as the claims may import. said heater throughout its length and em- I claim: bracing the tank to support the heater on the 1. A heater fora cylindrical water tank tank, and clip means slidably connecting '55 comprising an electric heater of suflicient said heater with said band, substantially as 120 length to engage the periphery of the tank described.

throughout a portion of the circumference 7. Asameans for heating water in atank,a

thereof, a band embracing said tank and sectoral heater of suflicient length to engage heater, said heater being slidably supported the tank through a portion of the circumon the band to permit the heater to be shifted ference thereof, a foundation segment of in- 12! circumferentially about the tank independsulating material backing said heater, a band ently of said band. embracing the tank and said foundation seg- 2. A heater for a rivet seamed water tank, ment to press the heater against the tank, comprising in combination, a band having clip means fixed to the heater and adjustably terminal ends adapted to lie on opposite mounting the latter on said band, and clip 13* means connected with said foundation segments to adj ustably support the same on said band, substantially as described.

s a means for heating Water in a tank, a sectoral electric heater adapted to engage the periphery of the tank throughout a portion of the circumference thereof and composed of a tank engaging strip of insulating material, a heating coil disposed against said strip, a heat insulating strip disposed against said coil. a band for supporting said heater against the tank, clip means connected with said heater and adjustably mounting the heater on said band, said clip means having a projecting portion for nal connection to said coil, substantially as described.

9. An electric heater of the class described comprising in combination, a strip-like coil core, a coil Wound about said strip core, an inside strip of heat conducting and electrically insulating material on the inside of said coil, a strip of non-heat conducting material and electrically insulating material on the outside of said coil, a supporter secured to said strips and having a projecting portion for support of an electrical connection, terminal Wires leading from said coil to said connection, and said supporter having means for holding said terminal Wires in position, substantially as described.

10. An electric heater for a cylindrical water tank, comprising in combination, a flexible heating coil structure adapted to be flexed into peripheral engagement about the tank, a flexible band embracing the tank and coil structure and means for securing the band about the tank, said coil structure being centrally supported and slidably connected to the band to permit slight displacement of the ends of said coil structure with respect to said. band as the latter is tensioned about the tank.

11. An electric heater for a cylindrical Water tank, comprising in combination, a flexible heating coil structure adapted to be flexed into peripheral engagement about the tank, a flexible band embracing the tank and supporting a termi coil structure and means for securing the band about the tank, said coil structure being slidably connected intcrn'lediatc its ends to the band to permit slight displacement of the ends of said structure with respect to said band as the latter is tensioned about the tank.

12. An electric heater for a Water tank comprising a coil structure, a band embracing said tank and coil structure, said coil structure being connected to and slidable on the band to permit a relative adjustment of the coil on the band, and means for tensioning the band about the tank.

13. An electric heater for cylindrical Water tanks formed of rigid material, comprising in combination, a flexible heating coil structure adapted to be flexed into peripheral engagement about the tank, a flexible band for backing said coil structure, means securing said structure to said band between the ends of the former thereby leaving end portions of said structure free to slide With respect to said band when both are disposed about said tank, and means for tensioning said band to hold said structure tightly against said tank, substantially as described.

14. An electric heater for cylindrical Water tanks formed of rigid material, comprising in combination, a flexible heating coil structure adapted to be flexed into peripheral engagement about the tank, a flexible band for backing said coil structure. means securing said structure to said band between the ends of the former thereby leaving the end portions of said structure free to slide with respect to said band when both are disposed about said tank, means slidably connecting end portions of said structure With said band to support said end portions on said band, and means for tensioning said band to hold said structure tightly against said tank, substantially as described.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my own, I hereby atlix my signature.

GU Y ARTHUR.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2423488 *Jul 16, 1945Jul 8, 1947Geo P Dowe Company LtdElectric tank water heater
US2485852 *Mar 9, 1946Oct 25, 1949Gordon B TeboStrap-on heater
US2585237 *Apr 3, 1946Feb 12, 1952Babcock & Wilcox CoMethod of making banded pressure vessels
US2629354 *May 25, 1949Feb 24, 1953Babcock & Wilcox CoApparatus for making banded pressure vessels
US2816201 *Jun 8, 1956Dec 10, 1957Mulvey Martin LElectrically heated plank
US2817742 *Jun 13, 1956Dec 24, 1957Wiegand Co Edwin LElectric heaters
US5168546 *May 8, 1991Dec 1, 1992Hydro-QuebecDevice for heating the bacterial proliferation zone of a water heater to prevent legionellosis
Classifications
U.S. Classification392/459, 219/526, 219/549, 338/316, 219/528, 338/243, 338/210, 338/209, 219/535
Cooperative ClassificationF24H9/1818