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Publication numberUS1310281 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 15, 1919
Filing dateFeb 1, 1919
Priority dateFeb 1, 1919
Publication numberUS 1310281 A, US 1310281A, US-A-1310281, US1310281 A, US1310281A
InventorsBertha Clark
Original AssigneeBertha Clark
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe-hanger.
US 1310281 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

B. CLARK.

SHOE HANGER. APPLICATlON FILED FEB. 1. 1919.

Patented July 15, 1919.

INVENTOR fi'i'flza Clark. By M ATTOH/Vf 8 @FFTQE.

BERTHA CLARK, OFBROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

SHOE-RANGER.

Specifleatlon of Letters Patent.

. Patented July 15, 19119.

Application filed February 1, 1919. Serial No 274,422.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, BERTHA CLARK, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the city of New York, borough of Brookl n, in the county of Kings and State of ew York, have lnvented a new and Improved Shoe-Hanger, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

The invention relates to apparel apparatus, and its object is to provide a new and improved shoe hanger more especially designed for home use and adapted to be mounted in closets or other places to compactly support a pair of shoes, slippers or similar footwear. Another object is to hold the toe portions of the shoes or other footwear in stretched condition thus maintaining the shape of the footwear and preventing oracking'of the uppers. Another object is to permit of conveniently placing the shoes in position on the shoe hanger or removing them therefrom whenever it is desired to use the shoes.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction as hereinafter shown and described and then specifically pointed out in the claims.

A practical embodiment of the invention is represented in the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification, in which similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views.

Figure 1 is a front elevation of the shoe hanger with a pair of shoes in position thereon, one of the shoes being shown broken out;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of the shoe hanger;

Fig. 3 is. a perspective view of a modified form of the shoe hanger; and

Fig. 4 is a similar view of another .modified form of the shoe hanger.

The frame 10 of the shoe hanger for supporting a pair of shoes 11 is preferably made of a piece of wire doubled up to provide an upright shank or stem 12 formed" at its upper end into a hook 13' for engagement with a support 14 in the form of a rod attached by suitable brackets (not shown) to the wall of a closet or the like 1n wh ch shoes are kept while not in use. The w1re portion forming the hook 13 is arranged to provide a loop adapted to be engaged with a nail or other support for supportlng a shoe hanger instead of supportin it from the rod 14, as above explained. he shank or stem 12 is provided at its lower end with forwardly extending arms ,1 20 slightly curved upward and terminating in return bends 2'1 extending in opposite directions and terminating in angular portions 22 on the lower ends of shoe-holding members 23 extendmg upwardly and terminating in toestretching heads 24 adapted to fit into the toe portions of the shoes 11. As illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, each of the heads 24 is made in two parts and the corresponding shoe holding member 23 is likewise made in two parts or arms 25, 26 of which the arm 25 forms part of the wire of which the frame is made while he arm 26 is attached at its lower end to the lower end 25. The arms 25 and 26 diverge to hold the sections of the head 24 spread apart to stretch the toe portion of the corresponding shoe 11, as will be readily understood by reference to Fig. 1. The arms 25 and 26 are adapted to be moved toward or from each other by an Sxhook 27 engagin the of the arm 1 arms. Thus by moving the S hook 27 ownupward the arms 25 and 26 and their head sections are moved toward each other. Thus by the arrangement described the toe portion of the shoe can be stretched more or less as desired by the user. When placing a shoe 11 in position on the shoe supporting member 23 the head 24 engages the toe portion of the shoe while the lower end of the shank 23 restsagainst the inner surface of the sole of the shoe as indicated in Fig. 2. It will be noticed that by the arrangement described the shoes 11 of a pair are properly supported side by side on the shoe hanger and the toes are kept in stretched conditlon thus maintaining the shape of the shoes and preventing cracking of the uppers.

In the modified form shown in Fig. 3, the toe stretching heads 24 form integral arts of the shanks 23 instead of being-ma e of wooden sections, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2. In this case the arms 26 and the S hooks 27 are omitted. In order to hold the doubledup wires forming the shank 12 close together one of the wires is preferably twisted around the other wire, as indicated at 28 in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, and bands 29 may be fastened around the two wires forming the shank 12 to hold the said wires together with a view to stiffen the shank, as indicated inFig.3.;

' In the modified form shown in Fig. 4, the shank 12,.instead of terminating in a combination hook and loop 13, terminates in a screw 30 adapted to be screwed into a wall or other suitable support. The shank 12 in this case is preferably disposed horizontally and its forwardly extending and upwardly curved portion 20 is engaged with the return bends 21 terminating in the portlons 22 of the" upright shanks 23, the upper ends of which are formed into heads 24 for engagement with the toes of the pair of shoes to be supported.

The shoe hanger shbwn and described is very simple and durable in construction and can be readily attached to a suitable support. A pair of low or high shoes or a pair of slippers or similar footwear ban be read ly placed in position on the hanger to support the shoes side by side without taking up much space- It will also be noticed that the shoes are supported with the toes upward and the toes are stretched at'the sides by the heads 24. The bends 21 and the adjusting portions of the arms 20 and 22 projecting out of the shoes provide a hook or su| porting other articles.

Having thus described my invention, I

claim as new anddesire to secure by Letters Patent 1. A shoe hanger for supporting a pair of shoes, compris ng upright shoe holdingmembers spaced apart and adapted to pass separately into the shoes to support the latter side by side in an upright position and with the toes upward, the lower ends of the supporting arms having forwardly extending portions extending out of the shoes, and a'shank intermediate the said shoe supporting member and connected at one end with the ends of the said extended portions of the arms, the other end of the said shank having means for engagement with a support: t

2. A shoe hanger for supporting a pair of shoes, comprising upright shoe-holding members spaced apart and adapted to pass separately into the shoes to support the latter side by side in an upright position and with the toes upward, the lower ends of the supporting arms having forwardly extending portions extending out of the shoes, the upper ends of the said shoe supporting members having two stretching heads adapted to fit into the toes of the shoes, and a shank intermediate the said shoe supporting member and connected at one end with the ends of the said extended portions of the arms, the other end of the said shank having means for engagement with a support,

. 3. A shoe hanger for supporting a pair of shoes, comprising upright shoe supporting members spaced apart and adapted to as separately into the shoes to support the latter side by side in upright position with the "toes upWard,'ea/ch shoe supporting member'\ forwardly extending angular portions extending out of the shoes, and a shank intermediate the said shoe holding members and connected at one end With the outer ends of the said angular portions of the shoe supportingmembers, the other end of the said shank having means-for attaching the shoe hanger to a support.

4. A 'hoe hanger shoes, comprising upright shoe-supporting members spaced apart and adapted to pass separately into the shoes to support the latter side by side in upright position with the for supporting a pair of toes upward, each shoe supporting member having diverging sprlng arms terminating in toe stretching heads fitting into the toe of the corresponding shoe, the lower ends ofthe said shoe supporting members having forwardly extending angular portions extending out of the shoes, means for moving the said spring arms of a shoe supporting member toward or from each other, and a shank intermediate the said shoe holding members and connected at one end with the outer ends of the said angular portions of the shoe supporting members, the other end of the said shank having means for attaching the shoe hanger to a support.

- 5. A shoe hanger for supporting a pair ,of shoes, comprising an upright shank providedat its upper end with means for suspending the shank from a suitable support, the lower end of the shank having a forwardly extending angular portion, shoe holding members having upright portions, and forwardly extending angular portions connected with the forward end of the said angular shank'portion, andtoe stretching heads on the upper ends of the said upright portions of the shoe holding members and adapted to fit into the toes of the shoes to be supported. o

6. A shoe hanger for supporting a pair of shoes, comprising an upright shank provided at its upper end with means for suspending the shank from a suitable support, the lower end of the shank having a forwardly extending angular portion, shoe holding members having upright portions and forwardly extending angular portions connected with the forward end of the said angular shank portion, and toe stretching heads on the upper ends of the said upright upright portions of the shoe holding memturn bends,

bers resting against the inner faces of the soles of the shoes.

7. A shoe hanger for supporting a pair of shoes side by side and made of a single piece of wire doubled up to form an upright shank provided at the doubled up end with a loop and a hook, the shank having a lower for- Wardly extending portion terminating in reand upright shoeholding members terminating in lower forwardly extending portions integrally connected with the said return bends.

8. A shoe hanger for supporting a pair of shoes side by side and made of a single piece of Wire doubled up to form an upright shank provided at the doubled up end with a loop and a hook, the shank having a lower forwardly extending portion terminating in return bends, upright shoe holding members terminating in lower forwardly extending portions integrally connected with the said return bends, and toe stretching heads on the upper ends-of the said shoe holding members.

BERTHA CLARKQ

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2545090 *Aug 18, 1949Mar 13, 1951Lau Michael FShoe stretcher and tree
US2555020 *Aug 31, 1946May 29, 1951Aurin Raymond AShoe holder
US2661568 *Aug 27, 1948Dec 8, 1953Stark DorothyBookholder
US2685699 *Sep 5, 1952Aug 10, 1954Norton Jr Charles TShoe tree
US2690571 *Feb 14, 1952Oct 5, 1954Gamble Morgan FBed attached appliance for holding slippers or the like
US2744270 *Nov 9, 1953May 8, 1956Charles MosesFlexible membrane shoe tree
US2965237 *Aug 6, 1956Dec 20, 1960Wells Wilby RichardShoe support
US4823962 *Oct 2, 1987Apr 25, 1989Arias Juan CShoe display and storage hanger
US5931314 *Sep 26, 1997Aug 3, 1999Footstar CorporationClaw shoe hanger
US6402105 *Sep 2, 1999Jun 11, 2002Principle PlasticsDisplay hanger
US6533127 *Aug 18, 2000Mar 18, 2003Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US6637603 *Jul 3, 2002Oct 28, 2003Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US6793080 *Jul 3, 2002Sep 21, 2004Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US6926157Sep 8, 2003Aug 9, 2005Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US6992118Sep 8, 2003Jan 31, 2006Cooper Vision Inc.Ophthalmic lenses and compositions and methods for producing same
US7021475Sep 8, 2003Apr 4, 2006Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US7025214Sep 8, 2003Apr 11, 2006Lynk, Inc.Over-door shoe racks
US20130055510 *Sep 2, 2011Mar 7, 2013Xinzhong BaoTool for boot and the like
EP0598325A1 *Nov 10, 1993May 25, 1994C & A MODE & Co.Shoe hanger
EP0780076A1Dec 17, 1996Jun 25, 1997W. WillpŁtz Kunststoffverarbeitungs GmbhShoe carrier
WO1990010407A1 *Mar 10, 1989Sep 20, 1990Juan Carlos AriasShoe display and storage hanger
Classifications
U.S. Classification12/116.8, 12/53.7, 211/34, 211/181.1
International ClassificationA47G25/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47G25/005
European ClassificationA47G25/00B