Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1310825 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 22, 1919
Filing dateFeb 20, 1918
Publication numberUS 1310825 A, US 1310825A, US-A-1310825, US1310825 A, US1310825A
InventorsJ. M. Ganzer
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Respiratory apparatus
US 1310825 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. M. GANZER. RESPIRATORY APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 20. l9l8.

Patented July 22, 191-9.

- INVENTOR 3 SHEETS SHEET I.

ATTORNEY J. M. GANZER.

RESPIRATORY APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 20. 1918.

Pateljted July 22, 1919.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

J. M. GANZER. RESPIRATORY APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 20. I9I8.

Patented July 22, 1919.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 3- ATTORNEY JOHN M. GANZER, 0F POUGHKEEPSIZ E, NEW YORK.

RESPIRATORY APPARATUS.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July 22, 1919.

Application filed February 20, 1918. Serial No. 218,270.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that 1, 'JOHN M. GANzER, a citizen ofthe United States, and aresident of the city of Poughkeepsie, county of Dutchess, and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Respiratory Apparatus, of which the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanying drawings.

Although I shall herein describe and illustrate the invention -as embodied in a gas mask, it will be obvious to those familiar with such matters that many, indeed, practically all of its features may be employed wherever a supply of air suitable for human respiration is desired to be assured, as, for instance, by firemen, miners, in chemical works, in refineries, at high altitudes, and elsewhere, and that certain of its features are applicable in submarine work.

In such structures as heretofore made cer-' tain desiderata, some of which are quite es sential for the reliable operation of the apparatus, have been insufiiciently provided for and some not at all. It is the purpose of this invention, therefore, to so construct and correlate the various parts of the apparatus that they shall individually and collectively greatly increase the healthful and life-saving operation thereof.

Generally stated, the invention includes means whereby the'mask may be held firmly upon the face of the wearer in such manner that all joints between the'edges of the apparatus and the face of the wearer shall be eificiently sealed, thus preventing the entrance or seepage of deleterious gases, smoke, fumes, or air, from the exterior to the interior. It also includes improved means whereby the joints between all edges of the apparatus and the face of the wearer may be securely sealed; also means whereby the air once used and partially devitalized may be ejected from the apparatus, either into the atmosphere, or into a suitable receptacle for vitalization; also means whereby the fogging of the eye pieces may be avoided; also means whereby the device will, upon applicationto faces of diferent shape and size, automatically adjust itself thereto; also means whereby double protection is afforded the wearer, that is to say, injury tothe hood or eye piece section will not interfere with the respirator-y portion of the apparatus; also means whereby respiration may be either through the nose or mouth, or both;

also an improved construction and arran e ment of the harness, or head straps, where y the apparatus is held upon the face of the wearer firmly, yet without painful pressures, and the permanence of all sealed joints effectively maintained.

In the drawings Figure 1 is a side elevation of an apparatus embodying my invention shown as in use upon the face of the wearer, the profile of the wearer being shown in dotted lines; Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view of the invention shown in Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is an elevation, partly broken away, showin the construction of certain of the parts 0 the respiratory portionof the apparatus viewed from the rear; Fig. 4. is an elevation of the parts shown in Fig. 3 viewed from the front; Fig. 5 is a horizontal plan view, partly in section, taken on the line 55 of Fig. 3.

Referring to the drawings, I will first describe the parts composing the respiratory portion of the apparatus, 2'. 6., those which cover and protect the nose and mouth of the wearer and supply air from the source of supply to the lungs and convey away the used air therefrom.

1 represents the mouth piece, 2 the nose piece. As shown best in Fig. 2, the mouth piece is of a general cwpshape, e., it has a rounding or arched exterior surface 3, 3,

and a substantially circular rim 4, the upper) part of which rim engages with the upper lip and checks of the wearer adjacent to the corners of the mouth and the lower part of which rim engages with the face of the wearer from about the corners of the mouth down to and under the chin. The nose piece 2. is generally hollow semi-pyramidal, in form and-has a rim which is substantially triangular and is the part which contacts with the face of the wearer. Allthe forwardly arched projecting parts of the nose I piece are curved or arched. The ridge 5 isfree passage of air'from the interior of the mouth piece to. the interior of the nose piece. In the outward or forward partof the mouth piece there is provided a cavity 9,

from which extends an air passage 10 upwardly to the outside of the n se piece where it is provided with a flutter valve 11, the openings 11* of which, in the example shown, occur at its corners and which, in a manner well understood, permit exit of air passing upwardly through the said passage, but prevent entrance of air downwardly therethrough.

Across the open side of the cavity 9 in the forward part of the mouth piece there 10 is arranged a flexible diaphragm l2, whlch may beneficially be made of thin and exceed- 1 ingly flexible rubber, which will retain lts flexibility and integrity for a long time. The edges 13 of the diaphragm are so connected at or near the edges of the cavity 9, that while they are hermetically sealed thereto, the body portion of the diaphragm is bag or pouch like in form, and is not in contact with any part of the apparatus, so that its inward and outward movements are not in any manner interfered with or hampered.

The lower part vof the mouth piece is extended downwardly, as shown at 14-, and within it is located a short section of tubing, 15, the upper part of which in the example shown, forms part or a couple of valve casings, one arrangedhorizontally and the other vertically, and the lower art of the so tubing afiords means to which t e air supply pipe 16 may be attached.

1? is a horizontally disposed valve set in a suitable casing in the upper part of the tubing 15 and which I prefer shall be of as the well known clapper variety made of flexible rubber fastened centrally and having a ribbed edge and which permits the passage of air from the supply pipe 16 upwardly into the mouth piece, but precludes at its passage in theopposite direction.

18 is an opening made in the side of the tubing 15, below the valve 17. It connects with a passage 19 located in the wall of the mouth piece and which opens into the cavity 9. 20 1s a'vertrcally disposed valve located in the opening 18, and so constructed that as the diaphragm 1-2 is drawn inwardly by the inhalation of the wearer, thus tending to produce a vacuum in the cavity 9, it will open and permit air from the source of supply through the supply pipe 16 to pass through it upwardly and through the passage 19 into the cavity 9 and upon the movev ment of the diaphragm 12 in the opposite direction due to the exhalation of the wearer, the valve 20 will instantly close and compel the air in the cavity 9 to move upwardly through the passageway 10 and the Y flutter valve 11 and out through its openings 11 into the space inclosed by the b ood, as

hereinafter more fully explained.

21 is a flutter valve which connects with a passage 22, which opens into the interior of the nose iece, and 23 is a similar flutter valve whit connects with a'passage 24, made preferably along the ridge of the nose piece, and opens into the space between the hood 25, the face of the wearer, and the exterior of'the respiratory members of the apparatus, 5. e., the nose and mouth pieces.

At all of the edges of the mouth and nose pieces, which constactwith the face of the wearer, I provide a peculiarly constructed seal, which is best illustrated in Fig. 3, that is to say; the edges of these parts, all of which are made of vulcanized rubber, are rolled over upon themselves, as shown at 26, and preferably terminate in a somewhat enlarged and solid core, edging piece, or beading, 27 which extends longitudinally throughout all the edges of the entire seal, or fringe, as I call it, upon both the nose and mouth pieces, and it will be noted, as shown at 28, that this same form of seal extends across the upper part of the mouth piece so as to effect engagement with the upper lip and checks of the wearer to approximately the corners of the mouth, where it vanishes, or thins away, into the part 29 of the main fringe, which extends around and under the chin of the wearer.

The hood 25 is provided with eye pieces 30, which may be of any preferredconstruction and material. making the body of the hood as heretofore, I prefer, although this is not essential, that it also shall be made of pure rubber similar to that from which the diaphragm 12 is made, except that it may beneficially be heavier and stronger, because if so, its durability, elasticity and ability to Withstand rough usage are greatly increased. As shown in the drawings, it is connected at its lower part to the downwardly extending projection 14.- from the mouth piece and extends upwardly and rearwardly therefrom in substantially the form shown. It is also preferably, although not necessarily connected to the exterior front surfaceof the mouth piece, and provision is made for the passage through'it of the flutter valves 21 and 23. The hood incloses, as usual, the entire respiratory portion of the apparatus and makes air tight contact throughout all its edges with the face, forehead, chin and cheeks of the wearer.

The straps, or harness, which .coniine the apparatus, to the head of the wearer, are as follows: 31 is a head strap. Instead, however, of starting at the upper edge of the hood, as usual, it isextended downwardly between the eye pieces and preferably quite to the end of the nose piece of the interior respiratory portion of the apparatus, although of course on the exterior of the hood, and 1s cemented, or otherwise fastened to the hood along the ridge of the nose'piece and also preferably across the forehead and the hood itself is similarly preferably far tened to the ridge of the nose piece. The

Instead, however, of v purpose of this construction is so that the head strap, which is extremely important in use and is the part which frequently gives way under strain, may have firm and reliable engagement or connection with the respiratory appliances, so that the nose piece, and through it the mouth piece, may both be pulled upward and the nose piece simultane- 1 ously backward against the face of the harness, or other appropriate part.

ing this strap to the edge of the hood, as

usual, I extend it as shown best in Fig. 1,

clear across the front of the mouth piece, where it is rigidly connected by cement or riveting, or in any other suitable and reliable manner, to the exterior arched or curved surface of the mouth piece. It' may be attached to the mouth piece either inside or outside of the material forming the hood.

If inside, then suitable sealed openings should be made therein, thatit may pass to the exterior thereof. This strap 32 is one contmuous iece and passes across the front of the mout piece, so that reliance need not be placed upon the strength or permanence of the stated cementing material or riveting,

or any other fastening devices which may be used, the function of which is merely to re-' tain the strap in proper position relative to the mouth piece. This particularity is desirable because the snugness with which the mouth piece is pressed against the upper lip and about the cheeks and chin of the wearer and likewise the snugness with which the nose piece isheld' at its lower part, where it is connected with the mouth piece, will largelydetermine the air tightness ofthe vitally important parts of the apparatus.

The strap 32 passes around the head of the K wearer, as usual, and is connected in the rear with the head strap 31, or the part to which it. is connected, as the case maybe, and is provided at its free end with a device, such as a buckle 33, whereby it is detachably attached to the rigidly fastened end 34. Between thehead strap 31 and the mouth strap 32 there is a forehead strap 35, which is preferably continuous and encircles the head of the 'wearer,passing acrosshis forehead at the upper edge of the hood,

where it is connected thereto, and around to the rear of the head of the wearer where it is connected to the head and mouth straps, or the art to which they are connected, as usual. he head, forehead and mouth straps may be made of strongly elastic material, or embody" elastic sections, so as to make the harness adjustable automatically to heads of varying size and contour; or, if preferred, they may be inelastic, or substantially so, their tension being'regulated by the degree of tightness with which they are applied. While, as stated, all of the straps, slnce they are continuous and inclose the parts of the apparatus where they are located, do not rely upon the hood to resist the strains to which they are subjectedfstill it is desirable that they be cemented, o-r otherwiseattached to the hood at or near its edges, so that they may aid in properly distending the hood and adjusting it upon the head of the wearer. It will be particularly noted that the connections between all straps and the respiratory devices, 2'. 0., either the nose or the mouth iece, are made at points far removed from t e edges of the respiratory devices where they contact with the face of the wearer. Consequently the said edges and the seal thereon are free to adjust themselves to the special conformation of the particular face upon which they may be applied. 4

The operation of the-apparatus is asfollows, and it will be particularly noted that a series of highly important results are secured,- which, so far as I know, have never been attained heretofore and which materially enhance the efficiency of the apparatus as a healthpreserving and life saving mechanism.

The apparatus is applied to the face of the wearer by first snugly adjusting the mouth and nose pieces over the mouth, nose and chin. In so doing, the upper edge of V the nose piece makes contact with the bridge of the nose, the upper edge of the mouth piece makes contact with the upper lip, and the lower edge of the mouth piece makes contact with the chin, and the side edges of the nose and mouth pieces make contact with the cheeks and jaws. The harness is then passed over the head of the wearer, as usual, and adjusted to position, and the mouth strap is drawn taut and fastened by the buckle or other device, whereupon the several straps will securely hold the apparatus in position about the face'of the 'wearer, and since all the straps are continuous and do not rely upon the strengthjof the edges of the hood to resist their strain, being only connected therewith sufficiently to secure its proper distension about the face of the wearer, there is no danger of rupturing the hood, either at its edges or at any other part.

The nose and mouth pieces are obviously the controllingly essential features of such an apparatus and it will be noted that the mouth piece, being, as stated, in the general form of a hollow cup, its outer surface eX- from the face of the wearer in all directions, so that when the mouth strap 32 is drawn with sufficient tightness, the mouth piece,

which may be said to be the foundation of the respiratory portion of the apparatus, will be drawn snugly against the upper lip, cheeks and chin of the wearer, and that owing to its arched formation in all directions, it is capable of resisting considerable pressureexerted by the strap 82, and yet the pressure transmitted through it to the upper lip, face and chin of the wearer will be distributed throughout the entire area of the rim of the mouth piece and will not exert painful pressure even after an extended use. It will also be noted that the nose piece is similarly arched in all directions and its free edges have an inclination rearwardly,

so that when applied to the face .of the wearer, as in Fig. 2, its upper part, which engages with the bridge of the nose, and the gradually spreading edges, which engage with the cheeks of the wearer, will be pressed snugly against them, partly because of the resiliency of the material of which they are formed, but more particularly because of the upward and inward pulling action of the head strap'31, so that the combined action of the head strap 31 .and the mouth strap 32 and the peculiar formation of the nose and mouth sections, cause all the edges of the respiratory portion of the apparatus to be held in permanent and close contact with the face of the wearer, and in order that the joint throughout may be permanently maintained and rendered securely air tight, the peculiar rolled construction of the fringe or seal is produced upon all of the edges in question and thus secures much better results than have ever been attained heretofore, so far as l am aware, because the socalled pneumatic cushions become practically useless if punctured, and the rubber of which they are formed, evenif-softly vulcanized, is far too rigid to automatically adjust itself air tight to the difl'erent shapes,

sizes and irregularities of the faces and heads of difi'erent wearers. The action of the curled over seal or fringe is peculiar, that is to say, as pressure is exerted upon it, the rolled over or curled contour normally present in it enabl its rolling or curling action to be extended or increased, and in so doing the elasticity due to the resilient character of the material of which it is composed, 27. e.', rubber, adds to the sealing effect due to pressure, and inasmuch as the seal, or fringe, upon the edges of both the mouth piece and nose piece is laterally expandible and contractible, it will be readily seen that connected with a suitable source of air supply, as, for instance, a canister carried by the wearer, or some exterior and more remote source of air, as the case may be, inhalation, either through the nose ormouth, or both, has a tendency to create avacuum in the open spaces of the nose and mouth pieces, which can only be satisfied by the entrance of air through the tube 16 and valve 17, which in response to the suction thus formed, immediately opens and air passes upwardly into the mouth piece and through it and from it through the openings 8 into the nose piece, and will be inhaled by the wearer through the nose or mouth, or

both, and then exhaled again through one or both,as the case, may be. As soon as the valve 17 closes, which will be upon the cessation of inflow of air to the mouth and nostrils, the exhaled air will escape through the Each inhalation, which, as stated, tends to produce a vacuum in the mouth and nose pieces, will also draw the flexible diaphragm 12 upwardly toward the lipsv of the wearer,

thus of course tending to create a vacuum in the cavity 9 in front of the diaphragm,

and this will open the valve 20 and cause some of the air from the supply pipe 16 to pass into the cavity 9, and upon the succeeding exhalation the diaphragm 12 will be flexed in the opposite direction, away from the lips of the wearer, which will contract the area of the cavity 9 and instantly close the valve 20, whereupon the air in the cavity will be forced upwardly throughthe passageway 10 "and the valve 11 and escape'at the outside of the nose piece into the space between the hood and the face of the wearer, and each successive inhalation and exhalation operating in the same manner will speedily generate a certain amount of air pressure in the space between the hcEd and the face of the wearer which will open the valve 23, permitting the escape of excess air within that space, and thus the hood will be ventilated and fogging of the eye pieces efiiciently prevented.

I call particular attention to the following, and as l believe altogether new features, that is to say: since the diaphragm 12 is continuously pumping airinto the space be-' tween the hood, the face of the wearer and the exterior surfaces of the respiratory portion of the apparatus, there 1s, as stated above, always more or less pressure withm hood and the face of the wearer, or any leaks in the hood itself, it will always be from within outwardly and cannot be from without inwardly, and consequently by no possibility can any noxious vapors or external air get into the hood, much less within the respiratory portion of the apparatus which is additionally isolated and sealed against such seepage. Also fogging of the eye pieces 1s occasioned mostly at least by reason of the exhaled, warm and moisture containing air, and it will be noted that in the devices shown, no part of the exhaled air can ever reach the eye pieces.

It will be obvious to those who are familiar with such matters that certain features of my invention are useful without the presence of certain others, that is to say: the respiratory portion of the apparatus, 2'. e., the nose and mouth pieces, with'their associated and co-acting parts may be beneficially used by themselves without any .exterior hood, which is all that is necessary in most cases of fire fighting and in many other cases where assurance of respiration of pure air is all that is requisite; also the respiratory devices and a hood without the hood ventilating features may be useful in many cases, in which event, the diaphragm l2 and its associated and co-acting parts may be omitted; also in cases where respiration through the mouth only is'necessary, the

mouth piece only need be employed, in which event, of course, the flutter valve 21 will be connected with the interior of the mouth piece, as at the opening 8.

As a matter of convenience, or economy in manufacture, itmay be more expedient to make the several parts, or some of them, as separate pieces and cement, or otherwise connect them in the form and adapted to fulfil their several functions, as above described. I advance no instructions or directions in this regard because such form no part of my invention.

In conclusion, I believe that there never before has been produced an apparatus of this class which affords such assurance of protection to the wearer and such comfort and reliability in use, because, for the reasons above stated, the possibility of any inward assage of deadly, noxious, or objectionab e vapors, gases, fumes or air, is quite effectively prevented, and yet the necessary amount of air for respiration assured; no

objectionable pressures other than are insep-- arably incident to such an apparatus are brought upon the face or head of the wearer; no mechanical means for closing the nostrils and no objectionable and dangerous mouth plugs are required, on the contrary, respiration is carried onin the usual and normal manner.

miliar with such matters that the apparatus" above described and illustrated is one form only in which my invention may be embodied and that modifications may be made therein without departing from the essentials of the invention.

I claim:

1. In an apparatus of the class stated, a hollow mouth piece, a hollow nose piece, both made of flexible material, an air passage connecting the two, an air. inlet for the mouth piece, a check valve in the inlet to permit inward and prevent outward passage of air, an outlet for used air from the mouth and nose pieces, a heck valve in the outlet to permit outward and prevent inward passage of air, a hood surrounding the mouth and nose pieces and engaging with the face of the wearer, means to both permit the entrance of air to, and prevent its exit from, the hood, other means to both permit the exit of air from, and prevent its entrance to, the hood, means actuated by the respiration of the wearer whereby air is forced into and out of the hood, and means to firmly hold the apparatus against the face of the wearer.

In an apparatus of the class stated, a hollow mouth piece, a hollow nosepiece, both made of flexible material and arched throughout their exterior surfaces, an air passage connecting the two, an air inlet for the mouth piece, a check valve in the inlet to permit inward and prevent outward passage of air, an outlet for used air from the mouth and nose pieces, a check valve in the outlet to permit outward and prevent inward passage of air, a hood surrounding the mouth and nose pieces and engaging with the face of the wearer, means to both permit the entrance ofairto, and prevent its exit from, the hood, other means to both permit the exit of air from, andprevent its entrance to, the hood, means actuated by the respiration of the wearer whereby air is forced into and out of the hood, and means to hold the apparatus firmly against the face of the wearer;

3. In an apparatus of the class stated, a hollow mouth piece, a hollow nose piece, both made of flexible material, a sealing device upon all the edges of the mouth and nose pieces which contact with the face and chin of the wearer, an air passage connecting nose pieces and engaging with the face of v the wearer, means to both permit the en- 7 trance of air to, and prevent its exit from,

the hood, other means to both permit theexit mo of air from, and prevent its entrance to, the hood, means actuated by the respiration of the wearer whereby air is forced into and out of the hood, and means to firmly hold the apparatus against the face and; chin of the wearer.

4. In an apparatus of the class stated, a

hollow mouth piece, a hollow nose plece,

both made of flexible material, an air passage connecting the two, an air inlet for the mouth piece, a check valve in the inlet to permit inward and prevent outward passage of air, an outlet for used air from the mouth and nose pieces, a check valve in the outlet to permit outward and prevent inward passage of air, a hood surrounding the mouth and nose pieces and engaging with the face and air thereto and therefrom, a hood which in-' closes the mouth and. nose pieces, means to permit the entrance of air to, and exit from, the hood, and continuous straps which hold the mouth and nose pieces firmlyagainst the face of the wearer.

6. In an apparatus of the class stated, a hollow mouth piece, a hollow nosepiece, suitable'means for the entrance and exit of air thereto and therefrom, a hood which incloses the mouth and nose pieces, means to permit the entrance of air to, and exit from, the hood," a continuous strip which presses against the mouth piece remote from its edges and is attached to the hood adjacent to its edges, and other straps which inclose the hood and are connected thereto adjacent to its edges.

7. In an apparatus of the class stated, the

respiratory portion whereof comprises a hollow-mouth piece and a hollow nose piece provided with suitable means for the entrance and exit of air thereto and therefrom, sealing devices which surround and separately inclose the mouth piece and the nose piece, the edges of which make contact with the forehead, cheeks, jaws and chin, a hood which incloses the nose and mouth pieces, a continuous strap which passes acrossthe mouth piece and is attached to the exterior of the hood, another continuous strap WlllCh passes across and embraces and is attached 'to the upper part of the hood, and another continuous strap attached to the hood and extendmg vertically over the ridge of the nose piece, between the eyes, across the forehead and over the head of the wearer, the said straps being so connected thereto and to the hood as to firmly hold the apparatus in desired position.

8. In an apparatus of the class stated, flexible devices adapted to cover the mouth and nose of the wearer and provided with suitable means for the entrance and exit of.

trance and exit of air thereto and there from, sealing devices attached to all the edges of said mouth and nose pieces .respec' tively which contact with the face, upper lip and chin of the wearer, a hood which incloses the said mouth and nose devices, and means to firmly hold the apparatus in desired position.

10. In an apparatus of the class stated, devices adapted to cover the mouth and nose of the wearer and provided with suit ble means for the entrance and exit of air thereto and therefrom, a sealing device for the edges of said mouth and nose devices which contact with the face and chin of the wearer, ahood which incloses the said mouth and nose devices, means actuated by the respiration of the wearer whereby air is forced into and out of the hood, and means to firmly hold the apparatus in desired position:

11. In an apparatus of the class stated, devices .adapted to cover the mouth and nose of the wearer and provided with suitable means for the entrance and exit of air thereto and therefrom, a sealing. device upon all the edges of said mouth and nose devices mouth and nose devices the edges whereof make contact with the face and chin of the wearer, means to create and maintain atmospheric pressure within the hood, and means to firmly hold the apparatus in desired position. r

12. In an apparatus of the class stated, a sealing device for the ed es of the respira-' tory portion thereof whifir contact .withthe face and chin of the wearer, consisting of a piece of flexible, air-tight material rolled over inwardly upon itself, a cross section of which taken at any part presents the contour of a volute.

13. In an apparatus of the class state embodying a respiratory portion and a hood, means to ventilate the hoodconsisting of a cavity in the respiratory portion the open side whereof is closed by a member. adapted to be moved to and fro by the respiration of the wearer, means to both permit the entrance of air to, and prevent its exit from, the cavity, and other means to permit the passage of air from the cavity into the hood and prevent its return to the cavity, means for the escape of excess air from the hood, and means to firmly hold the apparatus in desired position.

14. In an apparatus of the class stated, embodying arespiratory portion and a hood, means to create a circulation of air through the hood, consisting of a pump actuated by the respiration of the wearer which alternately draws air inwardly to the interior of the pump and ejects it therefrom into the hood, and means to firmly hold the apparatus in desired position.

15.11 an apparatus of the class stated, embodying a respiratory portion and a hood,

means to supply air to the interior of the.

hood consisting of a cavity in the respiratory portion the open side whereof is closed by a flexible diaphragm confined at its edges only, its remaining portions being free from.

contact with anything and adapted to be moved to and fro by the respiration of the wearer, means upon inhalation to both permit the entrance of air to, and prevent its exit from, the cavity, other meansupon exhalation to both permit the passage of air from the cavity into the hood and prevent its return to the cavity, means to permit the escapeof excess air from the hood and means to firmly hold the apparatus in desired position. t

Intestimony whereof I havename'to this specification.

JOHN M. GANZER.'

signed my-

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5460174 *Jan 24, 1994Oct 24, 1995Chang; HuangOxygen supplying system having flow control throttle
US7069933 *Nov 12, 2003Jul 4, 2006Resmed LimitedBreathing mask and mask cushion therefor
US7219670 *Feb 25, 2004May 22, 2007Sunrise Medical Hhg Inc.Method for securing a nasal mask
US8056561May 12, 2006Nov 15, 2011Resmed LimitedFull-face mask and mask cushion therefor
US20100258131 *Apr 8, 2009Oct 14, 2010Scott Technologies, Inc.Face seals for respirators and method of manufacturing respirators
US20130152935 *Feb 13, 2013Jun 20, 2013Mergenet SolutionsSystem, Method And Ventilation Interface For Providing Pressurized Breathable Gas To The Mouth And Nose Separately
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/204.26, 128/206.24, 128/207.11, 128/201.15
Cooperative ClassificationA61M16/00