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Publication numberUS1316309 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 16, 1919
Filing dateFeb 26, 1919
Publication numberUS 1316309 A, US 1316309A, US-A-1316309, US1316309 A, US1316309A
InventorsItrnatitts Knasteb
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
knaster
US 1316309 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

l. KNASTER. CLOSURE FOR COLLAPSIBLE TUBES ANDOTHER RECEPTACLES. APPLICATION FILED FEB. 26. 1919.

' 1 3 1 6, 309 Patented Sept. 16, 1919.

2 SHEETSSHEET I.

l. KNASTER. K CLOSURE FOR COLLAPSIBLE TUBES AND 0THER RECEPTACLES. APPLICATION FILED FEB- 26. I919.

1,81 6,309. Patented Sept. 16, 1919.

1 mally held in the aperture of the tube or the Iia-NATIUS KN'AS'IER, 0F CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND.

CLOSURE ron. conmrsmrpz. TUBES Aim 0mm nEcnrrAcLEs.

Specification of Letters latent. Patented Sept. 16, 1919.

Application filed February 26, 1919. Serial No. 279,401

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, IGNATIUS KNASTER, a subject of the King of Great Britain, and resident of 29 Green "Street, Cambridge in the county of Cambridge, England, have invented certain new and useful Improvements Relating to Closures for Collapsible Tubes and other Receptacles, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to caps or other closures for collapsible or other tubes, bot tles, sprinklers, or other receptacles. One object of the invention is to provide the cap or closure with a spring contrivance by means of which the'cap or closure may be permanently secured to the tube, bottle or the like, while at the same time the spring device facilitates the opening of the tube or the like and the obtaining of access to its contents. A further object is to form the said spring contrivance in such a way that,

the cap or closure when opened, is held well away from the orifice of the tube or the like.

-The invention is illustrated, by way of example, in the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 shows a collapsible-tube with one form of the closure device in the closed position, and

tion.

Fig.3 shows a modified 'form of closure for a collapsible tube or sprinkler for example.

Fig. 4 shows a form of the device applied to a sheet metal vessel, and

Fig 5 shows the closure device of Fig. 4 in the open position.- a I Fig. 6 shows a form of,the closure device applied to the metal cap of a glass phial, and

Fig. 7 shows the same in the open position, while j Fig. 8 shows the closure of Fig. 6 in section.

Figs. 9 and 10 show in the closed and the opened positions respectively, a form .of closure in which a sprin holds the cap on the aperture of the vesss.

Fig. 11 shows in plan view,and Fig. 12 in section a slightly different form of such a closure.

Fig. 13 shows in the closed position, and Fig. '14: shows in the open position a form of closure in which a spike or pin is nor Fig. 2 shows the same in the open posi- ,medicinal tablets.

instead of the spring wire being looped.

like for, the purpose of preventing coagulation of the contents of t ture thereof.

Fig. 15 illustrates the manner in which the closure device can be used for mounting'collapsible tubes and so forth on cards or sheets of other material for packing and for display.

In Figs. 1 and 2 the collapsible tube a has its screw cap 6 connected to the vessel by a bent wire spring 0, coiled at its laterally extending middle part, and having its one end twisted and fastened-at 41 around the neck of the vessel at thebottom of the screw thread, while the other end is looped at 6 around the central knob of the cap. This allows the cap to be turned in the spring device in screwing it up or unscrewing it. When the cap I) is unscrewed it springs open to the position'of Fig. 2, or to any other desired angular position depending on the strength or numberof turns of the spring coil 0. When the cap is to be closed again the spring coil acts as a hinge facilitating e tube in the aperthe correct application of the cap to the neck of the vessel.

The form of the device shown in Fig. 3 difi'ers only from that of Fig. 2 in that the cap I) is not a screw cap, and the nozzle is not threaded, but the'cap islocked in the closed osition by an extension f of the wire beyon the loop 6 engaging with a hook 9 formed by an extension of the wire beyond the part at whichengages with the neck of the vessel. 7 The cap is released by pressing downwardly and laterally the extension 7 to release it from the hook 9 when the device flies open to a position corresponding with that of Fig. 2.

Figsi 4 and 5 show an equivalent device to that of Figs. 1 and 2 but applied to a sheet metal vessel such as is commonly employed to hold liquid metal polish and so forth, the corresponding parts being lettered to agree with Figs. 1 and 2.

Figs. 6, 7 and 8 show a corresponding de .vice applied to the screwed metal stopper 7) of a glass phial a such.as is used for holding In this case, however,

around the knob on the closure device, this latter has a central hole in it through which the end of the spring wire is passed as at 72.,

Figs. 6 and 8, the end of the wire inside the cap I) being then coiled to form an enlargement, or being flattened out by pressure or otherwise so that it will not come out of the hole at h. Generally a disk of cork or the likelc is inserted inside the cap I) for effecting an air-tight closure, the coiled or flattened end of the spring wire lying between the interior of the cap I) and the back of the cork disk is, as seen in Fig. 8.

Figs. 9 and 10 show the alternative form of the device wherein the spring 0 tends to hold the closure on the aperture Z) of the vessel a. In this case one end of the spring is looped around a stud Z on the shoulder of the vessel a, while its other end is soldered or otherwise secured to the cap I). In the position of Fig. 9 the spring holds the cap positively against the aperture of the vessel. I'Vhen the cap is lifted and turned aside as in Fig. 10, the spring holds it against the shoulder of the vessel so that it cannot swing about or interfere with the discharge of the contents of the vessel through the aperture.

Fig. 11 shows in plan view the posit-ion which such a closure device generally occupies when lifted and turned aside to expose. the aperture, but in addition Figs. 11 and 12 also illustrate the application of the invention to a vessel which is hermetically closed by a thin diaphragm or septum m, this latter being pierced when the contents of the vessel are to be discharged. In this example the cap b has a central pin or spike 'n which serves the purpose of piercing the diaphragm, and around this pin or spike is aring 0 of cork, rubber or the like which will close against the top of the vessel surrounding the septum m after this latter has been perforated. In order then to prevent the premature perforating of the septum, such a device will normally be sold with a disk such as p formed of cardboard or the like which must be poked or shaken out in order to expose the spike n, and to allow this to be forced inwardly to perforate the septum m. The spike a may be of course of any shape so as to out either a hole say or elongated slot for example in the septum.

Figs. 13 and 1%}: show the application of the invention to vessels for containing coagulating adhesives, for which the best form of closure" is a pin or prong thrust into the nozzle of the vessel. WVhen this is withdrawn, it leaves a clear aperture for the escape of the fluid contents. The pin or prong member Q in this case is formed on or held by the end of one arm of the coiled spring a, which serves to hold the said pin or prong normally in the nozzle of the vessel as in Fig. 13. When some of the contents of the vessel are to be discharged, the projecting finger piece 1' is lifted to remove the prong q and this is turned aside so that the spring 0 holds it in the position of Fig. 14 during the discharge of the adhesive or the like from the vessel.

Fig. 15 shows how the collapsible tubes 11 or the like may be mounted on a card or other sheet such as t by cutting a slot therein for the spring loop 0 of each closure device to pass trough. This may be convenientboth for packing purposes and also for dis- 1 playing collapsible tubes in a shop window for example. If necessary a rod 01' wire u may be passed through the loops of a row of springs such as c for the purpose of securing them in position on a card. The loops of the springs 0 may also serve for attaching labels, price tickets and so forth, to vessels having caps, stoppers or the like applied thereto as hereinbet'ore described.

Having thus described my invention what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. An improved container comprising a receptacle having a neck with an orifice forming its outlet, a spring member, means for securing it to said receptacle outside the same. said spring member having an arm extending laterally a *ay from said neck and formed into a coil ofa plurality of turns from which a second arm extends back toward said neck, a closing device carried by said second arm, the spring member being so arranged that when the closing device is not in the closing position, the spring holds said closing device in a position wherein it is clear of the outlet orifice.

2. An improved container comprising a receptacle having a neck with an orifice forming its outlet, a spring member and means for securing it to said receptacle, said .spring member having an arm extending laterally away from said neck and formed into a coil of a plurality of turns from which an arm extends back toward said neck, said coil tending to raise the former of the arms away from the orifice of the receptacle, a-

capprovided. on said arm for closing said orlfiee, said cap bem provlded wlth releasable means for ho ding it down on the orifice when the receptacle is closed.

3. An improved container comprising a receptacle having a neck with an orifice forming its outlet, a spring member and means for securing it to said receptacle. said spring member having an arm extending laterally away from said neck and formed into a coil of a plurality of turns from which an arm extends back toward said neck, said coil tending to raise the former of the arms away from the orifice of the receptacle, and a screw cap provided on said arm for closing said orifice.

IGNATIUS KNASTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3239096 *Nov 25, 1964Mar 8, 1966Becton Dickinson CoCaptive cap assembly
US5772247 *Apr 25, 1996Jun 30, 1998International Book Marketing Ltd.Art kit in book form
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/292, 206/1.8, 206/1.9
Cooperative ClassificationB65D35/42