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Publication numberUS1327593 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 6, 1920
Filing dateApr 11, 1919
Priority dateApr 11, 1919
Publication numberUS 1327593 A, US 1327593A, US-A-1327593, US1327593 A, US1327593A
InventorsWilliam Dubilier
Original AssigneeWilliam Dubilier
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Series condenser
US 1327593 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

W. DUBILIER.

SERIES CONDENSER.

APPLIcATmN FILED APR.1I, |919.

1,327,593. Patented Jan. 6, 1920,

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INVENTOR .XMIM

M, ma( ATTORNEYS W. DUBILIER.

SERIES coNDENsER.

INVENTOR M I )@MJATTORNl-:Ys V

WILLIAM DUBILIEB, OIF NEW YORK, N. Y.`

SERIES CONDENSER.

Specication of Letters Patent.

Patented Jan. 6, 19720.

Application filed April 11, 1919. Serial No. 289,263.v

- To all whom t may concern.'V

Be it known that I, WILLIAM DUBILIER, a citizen of the United States, residing at New York city, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented a certain new and useful Series Condenser, of which the following is a specification.

The invention has for an object so to construct a condenser that the terminal connections may be readily made between different portions thereof.

Other objects are to provide a condenser in which such terminal connections will fall at points s paced to such an extent that the liability of an electrical discharge between terminals at different potentials is minimized, and to avoid the necessity of employing special insulating barriers or plates be-y tween the terminal connections.

Further objects and advantages of the' invention will be in part obvious and in part specifically pointed out in the description hereinafter contained, in which are disclosed certain embodiments of the invention; such embodiments however are lto be Aconsidered merely as illustrative of its principle, In the drawings:

Figures l, 2 and 3 are respectively top,

side and perspective views of a condenser.V

made in accordance with the invention.

Figs. 4, 5, and 6 are views corresponding respectively to Figs. l, '2 and 3, but showin another embodiment of the invention.

eferring to Figs. l to 3 of the drawings, a condenser is shown consisting of aplurality of conductin suitable insulating s veets 2 such as mica, the plates and sheets beingassembled', into a block preferably rectangular in shape, and having sides'B, 4, 5 and 6.

In the present instance, groups of conducting plates 1 are connected in parallel so as to form a plurality of sets of plates insulated from each other, which sets are of opposite polarity and may be connected in series to divide up the `potential to which the condenser is to be subjected, to such an extent as to prevent a failure of .insulation or breakdown in any portion thereof.

Terminals for each of the sets of plates Y are provided 1n any suitable manner, 'for instance by extending the edge portions of the plates of each set a short distance beyond the face of the block as shown at 7. The terminals of the different sets are then connected so as to place the requisite numplates 1, separated by ber of sets in series with each other, as previously described.

In order to prevent a discharge between terminals Which are to be at diiferent potentials in use, such terminals and their connections are brought out at'difleren't points around the sides ofthe block, so that each terminal willbe spaced aA relatively large distance from the others. In the embodiment shown in Figs. l to 3, this is accomplished by bringing out the terminals of successive sets. on different faces of the block, the terminals of the sets of opposite polarity in the'top layer, being brought out for instance at sides 4 and 6 respectively of the block, and the terminals of the sets of opposite polarity in the second layer being brought out respectively at sides 3 and 5 of the block, the terminals for the sets of the third Alayer at sides 4 and 6 respectively, and so on. The top terminal 7, for instance on side 6 of the block, may then be connected as by a conducting` strip 8 t0 the second terminal7 on the face 5 of the block.

The terminal 7 of the second layer, which may be connected by a ribbon ll-to the terminal 7 of the fifth layer which is on face 4 of the block, and' terminal 7 `of the fifth layerV which is on face 6 of the block bein connected by ay ribbon l2 to the terminal 7 of the sixth layer which is on face 5 of the *block, and so on.

' It will thus be seen that, with the above arra lement the terminal connections'` 8 `9 l0, 11, etc., extend around the sides of. the .block in a spiral fashion, although a regular system of terminal connections is not essential so lo'ng as the terminals which are disposed at similar points around the sides of the condenser are spaced a 'relatively large distance from each other. In the formshown in Figs. 1 to 3, the terminals 8 to 12 for instance, are spaced a distance equal to the thickness of three vgroups of plates, so that the chances of a discharge between such connections are minimized.

If the terminal connection between Isuccessuch insulating barriers, aside from the` greater expense which theyentail, are awlr- Ward in that they leave the condenser terminals in pockets or recesses, with a result that such terminalsl are not readily accessible for.

manipulation inmaling the terminal connections. With a condenser constructed in accordance with this invention, the greater spacing between the connections obviates the necessity` of employing insulatingbarriers between them, and4 no more insulation 'need be interposed between the superposed groups of plates, than is used between the different plates of the interleaved groups, insulating sheets of substantially the same dimensions may therefore be -used throughout, leaving the side faces of the blocksub-- stantially plane, and the terminal 7 of the different groupsprojecting from such faces in such a way as to be easily acessible for making the .terminal connections.

In Figs. 4 to 6 is disclosed a condenser` of different construction, but in which the same principles are em. loyed. -As shown in Fig. 4, a group of con enser plates 13 may be con- -nected in parallel and provided with a terf minal 14 on one facie` of a block '15 similar to the one previously described, which terminal may be formedsimply lby extending edges of the plates, of the grou-p beyond such side face. A second groupl of plates 16 is interleaved wi'th the group 14 previously mentioned, but has its common terminal 17 located for instance at the side 18 of the block 'adj acent to the side 15 which'carries the first mentioned terminal 14. The interleaved groups of plates in the second layer may then have'one terminal 19 located at the side face 515 of the block, and of the second terminal 20 located on the side face 21 of the block. The interleaved groups of the third layer `may then have one terminal 22 extending from the face 21 of the block, and a second terminal 23 extending from the face 24 of the block, the terminals` 25 and 26 of the fourth group being located respectively on.

faces 24 and 18 of the block,- the terminals 27 and 28 of the fifth interleaved groups being respectively at faces-18 and 15, the termmals 29 and 30 of 'the sixth group being respectively kat faces 15 and 21, the terminals 31 and 32of the seventh group being f respectively at faces '21 and 24, and so on.

Terminals 14A and 19, 20 and 22, 23 and 25, 26 and 27, 28 and 29, 30 and 31, etc., .may

then be joined together in any suitable man-` ner to connect as many of the groups in series as is desired With an arrangement of the character above described, it will be noted that the terminal connections are disposed about the side faces of the block in what may also be termed a spiral fashion, the first connection being on face 15, the second on face' 21, the third on face 24, the fourth on face 18, and so on, although a regular system of connections is not essential so long as successive connections be madel at did'erent oints around the the sides of the block whic will space the terminals and connections a relatively large distance from each other. With the spiral arrangement, connections and terminals such as 20 and 22, 30 and 31, which are disposed at similar sides or points around the -sides of the block, are spaced from each i other a distance approximately equal to the thickness of vthree interleaved groups of plates.

Therefore, no special insulating barriers between terminals or connections need be employed, but the faces of the yblock may be made substantially plane, with the terminals projecting therefrom in such a way as to be easily accessible. Y

`While certain specific embodimentsv of the invention have been described, it is obvious that many changes may be made Without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the following claims.

'li claim y A 1. A condenser, comprising a plurality ofconducting plates interleaved with insulating sheets. and assembled into a block, groups of said plates beingconnected in parallel to form sets of plates 'of opposite polarity, and terminal connections between said sets of plates extending from different points around the block, said connections which' are located at similar points around the block being spaced from eachother a distance greater than the thickness of on of said sets of plates.

2. A condenser, comprising a plurality of conducting plates interleaved with insu# lating sheets and lassembled into a block, groups of said plates being connected in parallel to form sets of plates of opposite polarity, and terminal connections between successive sets at adjacent faces of said block.

. 3. A condenser, comprising a plurality of conduictin'g plates interleaved with insulating sheets and assembled into a block,v the insulating sheets between said Iplates being all substantially- ,coextensive in dimensions so that their edges are substantially in line with each other, groups of said plates being connected in parallel to form sets of plates of opposite polarity, and terminal connections extending from different points around the block, said connections which are located at similar points on the sides of the block being spaced fromeach other'a mmm 4 distance greater'than the thickness of one i conducting plates interleaved with insulat-v of saidrsets of plates.

4. A condenser comprising a plurality of .ing sheets and assenribled into a block, groups of said plates being connected in parallel to form sets of plates of opposite polarity, Vand terminal connections `between successive sets of plates, said terminal connections being located on more than two.y

sides of said block, and Vsuccessive connections being at diii'erent points on the sides pfsaid mock.

5. A condenser. comprising a plurality of conducting plates yinterleaved with insulat-V tively large distance from the others.

6A. A condenser comprising a plurality of conductingplates interleaved With insulating sheets 'and assembled into a block, groups' of. said plates being connected in parallel to form sets of plates of .opposite polarity, terminals for the roups located on the sides ofsaid block, t e terminals for 'successive layers of groups being at di'ierf ent 4faces .of said block. Y

V7. A condenser comprising a plurality of conducting plates interleaved with insulating sheets 'y and assembled intoy a block,

groups'oafA said plates connected vin parallel to form sets'- of plates vof opposite polarity, terminals for the groups located on the sides of said block, the terminals for successive layersof groups being so disposed that at least one of thev terminals of each group is on a different face than one ofthe terminals of an adjacentgroup.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing, I have hereunto set my hand this 4th day of April, 1919."4

` -WILLIAM DUBILIER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2528596 *Feb 11, 1948Nov 7, 1950Micafil AgCondenser having a laminated dielectric thickened at its marginal portions
US4148003 *Jul 8, 1977Apr 3, 1979Globe-Union Inc.Series feed-through capacitor
US4870538 *Sep 26, 1988Sep 26, 1989Enercap CorporationHigh energy density capacitor and method of fabrication
US6118651 *Dec 24, 1997Sep 12, 2000Philips Electronics North America Corp.Flat electrolytic capacitor
Classifications
U.S. Classification361/329, 361/306.1
International ClassificationH01G4/38
Cooperative ClassificationH01G4/38
European ClassificationH01G4/38