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Publication numberUS1333836 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 16, 1920
Filing dateFeb 28, 1918
Priority dateFeb 28, 1918
Publication numberUS 1333836 A, US 1333836A, US-A-1333836, US1333836 A, US1333836A
InventorsCsanyi Henry
Original AssigneeCsanyi Henry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Art of producing charges for power devices
US 1333836 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. CSANYI.

ART OF PRODUCING CHARGES FOR POWER DEVICES.

APPLICATION FILED FEB-28,1918.

1,333,836. 3 Patented Mar. 16, 1920.

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%1 M alto 14404 4 vm w @azwmwzi HENRY osmr, pr fivnw YORK, n. Y.

ART OF PRODUCING CHARGES FOR POWIIR DEVICES.

Specification of Lettersratezit. P t t 1 1920 Application filed February 28, 1918. Serial No. 219,687.

To all whom it may concern.

Be it known that I, HENRY CSANYI, a citizen of the United States, residing at New York, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented new and useful Improvements in the Art of Producing Charges for Power Devices, of'which the following is a specification. v This invention relates to the art of producing charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles.

As is well-known, the charge which is introduced into the cylinder of an internal combustion power device preliminary to the.

charge combustion, comprises in the main ,atmospheric air and hydrocarbon, the latter generally in the form of vapor, the charge generally being produced by introducing the hydrocarbon content into the air as the latter is drawn toward the cylinder in what is known as the suction stroke of the cycle of operation. After compression, the charge is ignited, certain chemical reactions and changes taking place by reason of the explosive action brought about by the ignition of the compressed charge. For instance, the carbon content of the hydrocarbon and a portion of the oxygen content of the air react into carbon-dioxid (CO while the hydrogen content of the hydrocarbon reacts with oxygen contentof the air to produce a formof H O, the nitrogen content of the air being practically inactive. These are the main components of the hydrocarbon content and air content, such minor components as may be present being generally changed in some form or other.

In operation, the proportions of the charge components are varied under wellknown practice to meet various conditions, the relative proportions being designed with a. view to approaching as closely as possible a normal chemical reaction effect along the lines indicated, it being undesirable to provide either a charge too rich in hydrocarbon contentor too poor in such content, these variations tending to affect the chemical reac tion. Another factor is the question of propagation of the flame through the compressed charge to provide the explosive action, this also being more or less aflected by the character of the charge itself.

Under commercial operation, this oxygen content is provided by the use of atmosphericair, the apparatus being generally designed to operate under the usual atmospheric air conditions. For illustrative purposes, this air is considered as approximately' 80% of nitrogen and 20% of oxygen, the actual percentages varying slightly from these percentages. This use of atmospheric a1r provides a simple source ofsupply for the oxygen content of the char e, the nitrogen content being inacti've as above pointed out, producing no material disadvantage. As thls source of supply is ractically inexhaustible, it is generally a opted for commercial purposes. Since the oxygen content of the atmospheric air is made active in the general operation, it will be understood that where variation in the oxygen content of the charge is necessary, it requires the introduction of an increased quantity of air of which substantially 80% is inactive.

The present invention is designed, fundamentally, to produce a charge in which the relative percentages of active and inactive portions of the charge are changed in such manner as to decrease the percentage of the inactlve portion.nitrogenthe result being that the charge becomes of higher efliciency and thereby increases the efliciency of the power device. This result is brought about without affecting the use of atmosphericair as a carrier for the oxygen and hydrocarbons, and is produced by employing an ad- (lltlOIlEtlSOUI'Ce of oxygen supply in the form of an element in which the oxygen is nor mally combined with another gas which is, itself, an active agent in the combustion of the charge, such, for instance, as hydrogen. A simple source of such element supply is wate'rI- I Othe oxygen content of which represents'approximately 33%% of the element by volume as compared with the 20% content of atmospheric air, the hydrogen content providing the remainder of the water element. As will be understood, water contains a larger percentage of oxygen and would therefore, theoretically, provide a greater oxygen content as a source of supply for the oxygen content of a charge for this purpose. However, for practical and commercial purposes, Water as the sole source is of low. efliciency, due to the fact that'such water is in its liquid form and therefore requires special apparatus to produce decomposition of the Water into its gaseous content and inasmuch as the sup-ply of oxygen required necessarily varies in oporation of the power device, it would be necessary for such decomposing apparatus to be capable of meeting maximum conditions as to the amount of oxygen supplied. Obv1- ously, the cost of such decomposing apparatus and its operation, even though it were possible to develop an apparatus adapted to.

produce the desired oxygencapacity for successful operation of the power device, would greatly exceed any advantage gained in the decrease of the inactive portion of the charge present under operation'in connection with atmospheric air. In other words, while the use of water as a source of supply might theoretically provide for the production of a charge ofgieater serviceability as compared with atmospheric airas the source of supply, the largely increased cost in making water effective as the source. of supply practically bars its use in commercial practice as against the use of atmospheric air.

This inherent difficulty in the useof this sourceof supply .can, however, be largely overcome, if the water source of supply be utilized in the form of vapor or mo1sture or other more or less finely divided form of the water-steam, for instance, may be em-- ployed. In such case, the decomposing action is had on the molecules'as individuals instead of on the liquid body, and hence the apparatus required for decomposing action is greatly simplified and vcapable of being operated at low cost. This general form of the water is also advantageous .in that it permits of the use of atmospheric air as a carrier for the hydrocarbons, as heretofore, and in addition, as a carrier for the water, this result being obtained by the use of moisture-laden air currents.

' By employing moisture-laden currents as a source of supply for the oxygen, the entire elimination of the inactive portions of the charge is not obtained, since the nitrogen content of the atmospheric air remains present, but a decrease in this inactive portion is provided in that the inactive content of the total charge becomes of less percentage than where atmospheric air alone is employed,

the decrease depending upon the degree of saturation of the air, In addition, the percentage of the oxygen content of the charge is increased in proportion to such degree of saturation, since any displacement-of a given volume of atmospheric air by a similar vol; ume of water-represented by the degree of saturationexchanges an element. of 33% oxygen by volume for an element containing but20% oxygen content. Hence, any substitution in element thus made necessarily increases the oxygen percentage in the charge. For basis of comparison, the following approximate percentages may be given, atmospheric air, when used alone, being considered as 80% nitrogen (an inactive portion of the charge) and 20% oxygen. If, for example, a 25% saturation of the air is provided, and the water content provided by the saturation of the charge is decomposed, the approximate percentages of the principal gases would be: 60% of nitrogen (the inactive portion of the charge), 23%% of oxygen (15% from the air content and 8%% from the water content), and 16?;%

of hydrogen, the inactive portion of the charge being 60% in place of the 80% pro* vided. in the case of the use of atmospheric air alone. If the saturation is approxicompared with the 80% provided in the use of atmospheric air alone.

Hence, by employing moisture-laden atmospheric air as the source of supply for the oxygen, not only is it possible to retain the advantage in use of atmospheric air as the carrier for the gases, but, in addition, a more eflicient charge can be produced, since. not only is the inactive portion of the charge reduced in percentage, but, in addition, the oxygen percentage is increased and conditions more favorable to combustion are provided.

These results are obtainable by reason of the possibility of decomposing-the water by simple and efficient apparatus through the fact that the Water is in'a form capable of being rapidly decomposed by apparatus of this type. For instance, decomposition of the moisture content of moisture-laden air can be provided by the use of an electrolytic cell operating under comparatively small watt capacity. .And since the gases which are producedby such decomposing action are gases active in producing the chemical reactions taking place in the explosive chainber of the power device, such cell can be located in the path of travel of the moisture-laden air leading to the explosive chamber. By providing-a cell which is effective only on the moisture content of the moisture-laden air, the remaining contents of the charge are not afiected by this decomposing action and hence the general character of the charge is not so changed as to affect its efiiciency excepting in the direction of increase. 4

Moisture -'laden atmospheric air has, of course, heretofore formed a part of a charge for power devices of this type, this being present in the normal operations, for instance, of automobiles traveling during damp or inclement weather, the atmospheric air which is drawn into the motor being necessarily more or less saturated. But, in such operation, the moisture retains its element form until decomposing action is had in the explosive chamber itself through the moisture being substantially inactive While in the charge form and made active only during the period of explosive 1 action.

While thisadds to the oxygen content while the chemical reactions are taking place during the period of ex losion, and therefore has the advantage. 0 its presence at that time, this moisture content of the air presents a disadvantage while in charge form, in that the moisture, in its form of combined gases, takes the place of an equivalent amount of atmospheric air in which the oxygen content is more or less free and capable of taking up the hydrocarbons. Hence, in a given volume of air introduced into the intake leading to the explosion chamber, the presence of moisture would necessarily decrease the amount of the substantially freeoxygen content of the volume although the total oxygen content of the volume is increased, this being due to the fact that the oxygen content of the moisture is not free but combined with the hydrogen.

It has been proposed to dilute the hydrocarbon with water, thus introducing a water element into the charge in the form of moisture, but this operation, like that above indicated, provides for decomposing this moisture in the explosion chamber during the period of producing chemical reactions.

The present invention is designed to produce this decomposin of the moisture in v advance of the exploslon period and while .35

en-route to the explosion chamber. As a result, the oxygen content is complete with in the charge priorto the latter being subjected to action within the explosion chamber, enabling mixture with the hydrocarbon content to be properly had and bringing the mixture into the explosive chamber in proper condition for operation.

.The particular. point where this decomposing action takes place durin the travel to the explosive chamber may e as found desirable. For instance, it-may be located in advance of the carbureter structure, in which case the supply to the carbureter carries the nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen content in the form of gases, the decomposing action releasing the oxygen content of the moisture so that the oxygen content of the charge iscomplete prior to the carbureting action, the air which is introduced into the carburetor being moisture-laden. The more or less saturation of the air in such case may be provided in suitable manner as by a spray action or other well-known forms of saturating traveling air, or. where the general principles of the invention are employed in connection with automobiles,' etc. the invention may be utilized when the automobile is 0 rating in inclement weather ,or under con itions which produce a more or lessmoisture content to the air which is being out the drawn into the motor. Or, the general principles of the invention may be employed where the Water content is introduced into the air stream concurrent with the introduction of the hydrocarbon, as pointed out in a companion application filed March 2, 1918, Ser. No. 220,050, the moisture decom-' posing unit, in such case, being located at a point in advance of the explosion chamber and in the path of the moisture and hydrocarbon-laden air currents, the decomposing action releasing the oxygen-of the moisture prior to its admission into the explosive chamber. i

From the above it will be understood that the invention consists broadly in producing the oxygen content of the charge by subjecting moisture-laden air currents to decomposing treatment While (an-route to the point of combustion to augment the oxygen of the atmospheric content by .the oxygen of the moisture content of the currents being treated, this being true whether the air currents treated carry simply the moisture content or also include the hydrocarbon content the latter case the action of the decomposing unit is preferably such as not to materially affect the hydrocarbon content.

To these and other ends, therefore, the nature of which will be-readily understood as the invention is hereinafter disclosed, said invention consists in the methods and apparatus for carrying out such methods, hereinafter more fully described, illustrated in the accompanying drawings, and more particularly pointed out inthe appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings, in which similar reference characters indicate similar parts in each of the views:

Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view, showing a simple form of apparatus for carrying general principles of the present inventio Fig. 2 is a similar view showing a different arrangement of apparatusfor carrying out these general princlples.

Fig. 3 1s a view partly in side elevation and partly in section of as ific embodi 115 ment of the invention asap ied in the flow path of air leading to a car ureter.

. Fig. 4 is a top plan view of the decomposing unit. Fig. 5 is an end elevation of the same;

As heretofore pointed out, the invention, in it's broadestiaspect, is designed to provide substantially the complete oxygen content of the charge in advance of the charge reaching the explosive chamber, this bemg 125 had by breaking down oxygen-bearing elements which may be carried by the atmospheric air so as to release the oxygen content. thereof to augment the oxygen'content of the atmospheric air. r v

' flowing stream.

-In Fig. 1 I have illustrated diagrammatically a simple arrangement of this type, wherein E indicates the cylinder of the power device and which carries the explosive chamber, C a carbureter, and D a decomposing unit, these parts being connected by passageways, with the carbureter intermediate the decomposing unit and the explosive chamber. The decomposing unit is located in the flow path of the air entering through a suitable air intake A, so that the entering air will pass successively through the unit and carbureting apparatus to the explosive chamber. Where the atmospheric air which passes in to intake A is more or less moistureladen, it will, in passing through the unit, also carry its moisture through the unit, the latter operating to decompose the moisture content, whereupon the flowing air stream will have the elements of the saturating moisture decomposed, so that the oxygen content of the flowing stream will practically comprise the oxygen of the atmospheric air and the oxygen content of the moisture, the hydrogen content of the latter also being carried on with the The stream then passes through the carbureting apparatus, taking up the hydrocarbon content of the charge, and then passes onward and into the explosive chamber as is usual. Where the invention is operatin in connection with atmospheric air whic is not moisture-laden or contains a less amount of moisture than is desired, a suitable apparatus for introduc ing water 1n vapor, spray or other form which provides for a fine division of the water content, maybe located between the air intake and the decomposing unit-a1- though it may be made efi'ective prior to the admission of the atmospheric air into the intakethus introducing the moisture into 7 the incoming air stream, the moisture-laden air stream then passing onward throu h the unit and carbureting apparatus into t e explosive chamber as before.

In Fig. 2 I have shown a different application of the general principles of the invention, the carbureter or other source of hydrocarbon supply being located in ad- Vance of the'decomposing unit, so that the latter is made .operative after the air has received its hydrocarbon content. In this particular'form, the water mayy 'be introduced into the flowing stream through the carbureting apparatus, the water content being located in the carbureter and taken up with the hydrocarbon by the incoming air stream during the carbureting operation. Or this particular type may be varied, as for instance is pointed out in the companion application referred to, by utilizing the water in connection with a heavier hymore finelydivided vapor than is possr le where the heavy hydrocarbon is employed alone, the incoming air receiving this vapor from the vapor source of supply and carrying'it onward through the decomposing unit to the explosive chamber.

In either case, the atmospheric air is moisture-laden, and the moisture thereof is decomposed while en-route to the explosive chamber and before the period when the chemical reactions areprovided by explosion of the charge.

Any desired type of apparatus for pro ducing this decomposing action of the moisture may be employed, as for instance by the use of apparatus operating to decompose by a heat action, but I prefer to employ what I may term an electrolytic cell which provides the moisture decomposition by electrolysis. It is to be understood, of course, that I prefer to employ, in either instance, apparatus which can produce this decomposing action on the moisture portion of the stream, it being preferred not to materially afl'ect the atmospheric air or the hydrocarbon content. This may'require more or less care in the formation of the decomposition unit to meet this particular condition, but this control can be readily obtained, especially if the decomposing unit is operating under electrolysis principles, in which case the spacing of the anode and cathode systems may form a factor in this control, the wattage of the cell so formed being another factor. It might be noted that where the apparatus is installed of the ignition system may be'suflicient' for the purpose where the anode and cathode electrodes are properly spaced.

For the purpose of illustration, I have shown a simple form of decomposing unit which may be employed under such conditions, Figs. 3 and 4 illustrating a simple construction of the unit.

11 designates an open-top casing closed by a cover 12, said casing having an inlet port 11 and an outlet port 11'. In the particular arrangement shown in Fig. 3, outlet port 11 is connected to the inlet end of a carbureting structure, while the inlet port 11 provides the inlet for the air stream, this port being preferably provided with a screen structure 13 which operates to prevent the entrance of particles which might tend to short-circuit the unit. Obviously, the inlet and outlet ports of the casing will be mounted in the flow path of the air currents to meet the general conditions as indicated in Figs. 1 or 2.

The anode and cathode systems, in the form of unit shown, are carried by cover 12, the anodes and cathodes being in the form of plates 14 and 15,- these plates being arranged in interspaced or alternate arrange- .i'nent, viz: a cathode plate is mounted be- ;drocarbon for the purpose of producin .tween adjacent anode plates and vice versa,

system of electrodes, the plates being spaced apart a suitable distance toprovide forv the passage of the moisture-laden air currents through these spaces.

As shown, the platesaresupported in a more or less pack formation by the use of bolts or other standards 6 which are secured in depending relation from the cover, being suitably insulated from, the cover. As shown more particularly in Fig. 3, two forms of standards or supports are provided,those indicated at 16 forming more particularly supporting and -alining posts or supports, the posts or supports extending through openings formed in the plates, a post or support 16 carrying an insulating sleeve 17 surrounding the post or support, the openings. in the plates loosely fitting these sleeves. AS shown in- Fig. 4, there are four of these posts, thus'providing'a simple arrangement by means of which plates will be held against movement in their individual planes relative to each other or to these posts. In addition, there are shown two posts or supports 16 these posts or supports extending through openings formed in the plates,

. sleeves 17, however, being omitterL The plate openings for posts 16 differ in connection with the different system of electrodes. These posts 16 form binding posts for connection with the source of el trical supply, indicated diagrammatically as'a attery 20, although it will be readily understood that any suitable source may be employed, the two posts or supports forming opposite terminals. Hence, one of the systems is in electrical connection with one post 16,,the other system being in electrical connection with the other post .or support. Obviously, the system of plates which is in electrical connection with one post must necessarily be insulated from the other post, and this can be provided in any desired manner, a sim le arrangement being to increase the size 0 the openings through which the,

post extends in those plates which are to be insulated from the post, posts 16 and sleeves 17 acting to prevent shifting of the plates in such manner as to afi'ect the annular space provided by the increased size of the openlngs. The plates may be spaced apart 1n suitable manner, a simple formation being by the use of insulating washers or disks 18 mounted on the desired number of posts, it being readily understood that washers may be mounted on posts carrying sleeves 17, although these washers are omitted in Fig. 3.

The spacing of the electrodes will depend more or less upon the wattage of the source of electrical supply and the general character of the moisture-laden air currents which are to be treated. It is preferred that the arrangement be such that the electrolysis action is bad in connection with the water moisture, without, however, materially affecting-either the atmospheric air or hydrocarbons, this latter condition not being .so

essential where the unit is located in advance of the carbureting structure.

As will be understood, mounting of the anode and cathode systems on Qthe cover, enables the structure tobe removed as a unit for repairs or cleaning and without afl'ecting the mounting of the casin A unit of this type 'wil? operate with efliciency where the water content is in the form of moisture, the electrolytic actiontaking place during travel of the moisture-laden airfstream, the gases decomposed and liberated by this electrolysis action simply passing onward with the atmospheric air content. 7

It is possible, of course, that operating conditions may be such that it is not possible to provide the moisture for the air.

streams atall times, as for instance in connection with the operation of automobiles, 'where it may be inconvenient to provide water supply apparatus for introducing moisture into atmospheric air. In such case,

the power device will operate under onditions of ordinary atmospheric air-.s pply similar to the usual operating conditions,

ciples o the present invention can be em-- ployed to change what is, under present day operation, consider ed disadvantageous, into a positive advantage, this result being brought about by the fact that operation of weather conditions which-tend to produce a moisture-laden air supply for the power device, will become an advantage instead of a disadvantage. As is well-known under present day practice, the general character of the charge is materially varied. where the source of air supply is moisture-laden. In such case, it is the general practice to tend to reduce the air content of the charge and increase the hydrocarbon content, thus increasp the power device under inclement or other ing the cost of operation through in ease in the amount of hydrocarbon used in reducing the charge. By employing the principles of the present invention, and by the location of a decomposing unit in advance or in rear of the carbureter, so that the moisture-laden air has the moisture content decomposed, the general operation is made more efiicient and less costly in the expenditure of the hydrocarbon.

By arranging the unit with the electrodes properly spaced, the electrical supply may be obtained from the ignition circuit of the power device, so that it is possible to produce this result by simplymounting a decomposing unit in the flow path of the air stream and provide a guard against the entrance of particles which might tend to short-circuit the unit. Since the electrode systems are designed to be substantially inelfective on'atmospheric air, the unit will remain practically inactive excepting where the entering air carries the moisture, in which case decomposing action will automatically take place, the activity of the unit continuing as long as moisture is present in the air passing through the unit, so that current consumption is practically limited to periods where moisture is present.

As will be understood, an air supply for moisture-laden air currents will be present whether the air receives its moisture before or after entering the intake or whether the moisture is specifically provided or is present through natural causes.

While such embodiment of the present invention would be more or less intermittent in operation as compared with the use of a constant supply of moisture-laden air streams, it is to be understood that the principles of the present invention become active whenever operating conditions provide the moisture content of the air, and hence such use falls within the general and broad principles of the present invention.

While --I have herein disclosed various ways in which the general principles of the invention may be carried out, it will be readily understood that these principles may be embodied in other relations and in various embodiments of apparatus for carrying out the principles, it being understood that the structural details shown are more or less illustrative in character, and I de-' sire to be understood as reserving the right to make all such changes or modifications in specific embodiments as may be found desirable or essential in meeting the exigencies of use, in so far as the same may fall within the spirit and scope of the broad principles underlying the present invention and within the spirit and scope of the appended claims when broadly construed.

What I claim is:

1. In the art of producing charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles, a method of producing the oxygen content'of the charge which consists in'subjecting moisture-laden air currents to decomposing treatment while enroute to the point of combustion to augment the oxygen of the atmospheric content by the oxygen of the moisture content of the currents being treated.

2. In the art of producing charges for, power devices operating under internal combustion principles, a method of producing the oxygen content of the charge which consists 1n subjecting moisture-laden air currents to electrolysis treatment during travel pheric content by the oxygen of the mois- V ture content.

4. In the alt of producing charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles, a method oi producing the oxygen content of the charge'which consists in subjecting moisture-laden air currents to decomposing treatment while enroute to the carbureting structure to augment the oxygen of the atmospheric content by the oxygen of the moisture content of the currents being treated.

5. In the art of producing charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles, a method of producing the oxygen content of the charge which consists insubjecting moisture-la den air cur: rents to electrolysis treatment during travel of the currents to the carbureting structure to decompose the moisture content and augment the oxygen of the atmospheric content by the oxygen of the moisture content.

6. In the art of producing charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles, and wherein the completed charge is delivered to the explosive chamber of the power device, means for producing the oxygen content of the charge, said means including an air supply lfor moisture-laden air currents, and means operative'within the flow path of such currents fol-decomposing the moisture content of the currents to augment the oxygen of the atmospheric content by the oxygen of v the moisture content.

7. In the art of producing charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles, and wherein the completed charge is delivered to the explosive chamber of the power device, means for producing the oxygen content of the charge, sald means including an air supply for momture-laden air currents, and a decomposing unit operative within the flow path of such currents for decomposing the moisture content of the currents to augment the oxygen of the atmospheric content by the oxygen of the moisture content.

8. In the art of producing charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles, and wherein the completed charge is delivered to the explosive chamber of the power device, means for producing the oxygen content of the charge, said means including an air supply for moisture-laden air currents, and an electrolytic cell operative within the flow path of such currents for decomposing the moisture content of the currents to augment the oxygen of the atmospheric content by the oxygen of the moisture content.

9. In the art of producing charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles, carbureting mechanism, and means for producing the oxygen content of the charge, said means including an air supply for moisture-laden air currents, and means operative within the flow path of such current-s to the carbureting mechanism for decomposing the moisture content of the current stream to augment the oxygen of the atmospheric content by the oxygen of the moisture content.

10. In the art of producing charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles, carbureting mechanism, and means for producing the oxygen content of the charge, said means including an air supply for moisture-laden air currents, and an electrolytic cell operative within the flow path of such currents to the carbureting mechanism for decomposing the moisture content of the current stream to augment the oxygen of the atmospheric content by the oxygen of the moisture content.

11. A decomposing unit for mechanisms adapted to provide charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles, said unit comprising a housing located in the charge-supply line, interspaced anode and cathode systems within the housing, said systems being relatively arranged in pack formation to provide passageways for the movement of air currents through the pack, and a source of electrical supply for said systems.

12. A decomposing unit for mechanisms adapted to provide charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles, said unit comprising a housing located in the charge-supply line, inter spaced anode and cathode systems within the housing, said systems being relatively arranged in pack formation to provide passageways for the movement of air currents through the pack, and a source of electrical supply for said systems, each system including a plurality of plates electrically connected, a plate of one system being interposed between adjacent plates of the other system to provide spaces between adjacent plates, each space forming a passageway for the air.

13. A decomposing unit for mechanisms adapted to provide charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles, said unit comprising a housing located in the charge-supply line, interspaced anode and cathode systems within the housing, said systems being relatively arranged in pack formation to provide passageways for'the movement of air currents through the pack, and a source of electrical supply for said systems and adapted to operate under predetermined wattage conditions, each system including a plurality of plates electrically connected, a plate of one system being interposed between adjacent plates of the other system to provide spaces between adjacent plates, each space formin a passageway for the air, the spacing of the plates cooperating with the wattage to limit decomposing action to moisture content of the flowing air currents.

14. A decomposing unit for mechanisms adapted to provide charges for power devices operating under internal combustion principles, said unit comprising a casing and a removable cover therefor, said casing being located in the charge-supply line, interspaced anode and cathode systems supported by said cover and extending into the casing, said systems being relatively arranged in pack formation to provide passageways for the movement of air currents through the pack, and a source of electrical supply for :t1(l systems.

In testlmony whereof I have hereunto set my hand.

HENRY CSANYI.

Referenced by
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US3805492 *Jul 5, 1973Apr 23, 1974King AMethod and apparatus for treating carbureted mixtures
US3963408 *Apr 29, 1975Jun 15, 1976F. D. Farnum Co.Precombustion conditioning device for internal combustion engines
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Classifications
U.S. Classification205/628, 204/DIG.600, 55/DIG.280, 123/DIG.120, 123/539, 48/199.00R
International ClassificationF02M25/12
Cooperative ClassificationF02M25/12, Y02T10/121, Y10S55/28, Y10S123/12, Y10S204/06