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Publication numberUS1335929 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 6, 1920
Filing dateApr 5, 1919
Priority dateApr 5, 1919
Publication numberUS 1335929 A, US 1335929A, US-A-1335929, US1335929 A, US1335929A
InventorsAllen Victor M
Original AssigneeAllen Victor M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic window-ventilator
US 1335929 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

'v. M. ALLEN.

AUTOMATIC wmnow VENTILATOR.

APPLICATION FILED APR.5, I919.

Patehted Apr. 6, 1920.

5 SHEETS-SHEET 1.

' for/Milieu V. M. ALLEN.

AUTOMATIC WINDOW VENTILATOR.

APPLICATION FILED APR.5, 1919.

' Patented Apr. 6, 1920.

5 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

V. M. ALLEN.

AUTOMATIC WINDOW VENTILATOR. APPLICATION men APR.5, 1919.

Patented Apr. 6, 1920.

5 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

zivyn/iol.

l/vbzw' W file/a v. M. ALLEN.

AUTOMATIC WINDOW VENTILATOR. APPLICATION FILED APR-5, I919.

1,335,929. Patented Apr. 6, 1920 5 SHEETSSHEET 4.

V. M. ALLEN.

AUTOMATI'C WINDOW VENTILATOR.

' APPLICATION FILED APR. 5, 1919. I 1,335,929 Patented Apr. 6, 1920. y 5 SHEETS-SHEET 5. I

-172 z/enion To all whom it may concern:

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

.vIc'ron. M. ALLEN, or wAvnnLY, new YORK.

AUTOMATIC WINDOW-VENTILATOR.

Specification of Letters Patent. iPatented Ajpl. 6, 1920- Application filed April 5. 19l9. Serial No. 287.858.

Be it known that I, Vroron M. ALLEN, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Waverl in the county of Tioga and State of how York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Automatic Window-Ventilators, of which the following is a specification- This invention relates to automatic window ventilators, and has for its object to provide a device of this kind with improved means for adjusting the panels of the ventilator so that they may be partially or en-' tirely closed by a high wind but will be au tomatically opened again to -a predetermined extent after the wind has subsided.

A further object is to construct the counterbalance for the panels in such a way that the leverage of said counterbalance will increase as the weight of the panels increase in being moved from closed to open position.

Another object is to provide means adapted to be operated from the inside of the window for setting limits for the automatic movements of the panels whereby the-latter may be initially adjusted to normally stand open at any desired extent and to close entirely or to. any desired degree under the action of the wind. v

The invention also contemplates-the use of a sash. in connection with the ventilator and the provision of means for locking said sash.

at different adjustments so 'as to cover the ventilator to any desired degree for further determining the amount of air admitted according to climatic conditions.

Another object is to provide temperature controlled means for automatically actuating the ventilator panels so as to move them toward closed position when the temperature drops to a predetermined extent and to move them back again to normal position tion.

In the ac ompanying drawings, wherein similar reference characters are used to deslgnate corresponding parts throughout the several views- Figure 1. is an elevation of a window ven-- tilator constructed substantially in accordance with the present invention, looking at the same from the outside.

Fig. 2 is. a broken vertical section through the upper part of the frame of the ventilator to show the rock shaft for controllin the movements of the panels.

from the inside.

Fig. 4. is a broken top edge view of the ventilator frame to show the grooves to receive the sash and the screen.

Fig. 5 is a central vertical section through the ventilator, showing the panels inopen position and the sash partially lowered.

Fig. 6 is a vertical section taken through the upper portion of the frame of the ventilator and the center of-the adjustable stops or slides for regulating the extent to which athe panels may be opened.

Fig. 7 is a detailed view of the gearand 1 rack for adjusting the lower stop or slide. Fig. 8 is a detailed perspective one of the panel supports. c

Fig. 9 is a detailed view of the gear and rack for adjusting the upper stop or slide which controls the extent of movement of the panels.

v Fig. 10 is a detailed elevation of the easing for the adjustable stops or slides looking at the same from the inner face thereof which is presented to the frame of the ventilator, and showing the means for retaining said slides in set positions.

Fig. 11 is a broken inside elevation of a modified. form of ventilator provided with temperature controlled means'for actuating the panels.

Fig. 12 is a broken sectional view through the part of the frame in which the temperature controlleddevice is arranged the section being taken vertically from side to side of the frame.

Fig. 13 is a section taken vertically from front to back through the same parts.

Fig. 14 is a detailed sen-tion vertically through the mercury tube and float supported weight which constitute essential parts of the temperature controlled device; and

Fig. 15 is a detailed cross section through one of the edges-of the ventilating openings in the frame, showing the weatherproof ig. 3 is an elevation of the ventilator view of r the outer face of the panel, a tongue 16 to engage the upper edge. of the panel; and a of each panel overlaps the upper edge of the next lower panel on the outside when closed, and said panels are pivoted nearer their upper edges so' that they will be normally closed by gravlty.

The ends of the panels are connected together below their pivots 5 by strips 6 by which all of the panels are actuated in uni:

son. Each of these strips is provided with an inwardly turned flange 7, Fig. l5,'which engages a groove 8 in the side ofthe ventilating opening 2, when the panels are closed, for keeping out the weather. The upper edge of the ventilating opening overlaps the upper edge of the top panel, as at 9, Fig. 5, and has a horizontal groove 10 in its inner face to receive an outwardly projecting packing strip 11 on the outer face of the upper edge portion of the top panel, when the latter is closed, in order to make the top as well as the side of the ventilator weath-- erproof. -The lower edge of the bottom 1 panel when closed overlaps a sill 12, at the bottom of the ventilating opening 2, and fits loosely enough to permit any water which may -'be forced through between the over-' lapping panels by a heavy wind to run out and be discharged on the outside of the ventilator instead of entering the room.

As illustrated in Fig. 8 each of the supports 4 for the transparent panels 3- is pref-' erably made of a single piece of sheet metal bent to form a base portion 13 to cover the end of the panel, flanges 14 and 15 to engage the inner face, lower edge and part of pivot lug 17, formed as an extension of the base 13 between the flanges 14 and 15: The tongue 16 is bent out of the way when the panel is inserted into the-support, and after ward turned back to the position shown for retaining said panel in the support.

The stripsfi are connected at their upper ends'respectlvely to'crank arms .18 depending. froma rock shaft 19 journaled in suitable hinge lugs 20 and housed in a recess 21- in the upper portion of the frame'over the opening 2, as shown, in F ig'. 2. On one end of the rock shaft'there is fixed a lever 22 extending beyond the inner face of the frame and carrying a weight 23 for counter-balancing :the panels and yieldingly holding them open against the force of gravity;

' 26 or the like. 7

the weight on the lever provldes for m-,

which, as has been already explained, serves to hold them normallyclosed. '-The weight 23 is vertically adjustable on-a'c arrier 2l, as by engaging screw threads 25, on the latter, or otherwise, and said carrier is horizontally adjustable along the lever 22, being retained in adjusted position bya set screw This double adjustment of creasing leverage asthe panels are opened and said lever swings downward, so as to offset the increased weight of the panels as they are swung upwardly toward fully opened position, as indicated in Fig. 5. In

this figure it will be seen that the weight is I farther removed from the fulcrum on the rock shaft 19 measuring in a horizontal line, than when the lever isho-rizontal as in Fig. 6. The weight 23 may be set to nicely counterbalance the panels so that a slight wind will close them, as in a hospital where it s.

desirable to keep the patients out of any draft, or said weight may 'be adjusted to hold the panels open against all but strong winds so as to permit the air to enter when only moderate winds are blowing, which would be desirable in gymnasiums where persons are exercising, for instance.

It is desirable to limit the movements of the panels, as will be readily appreciated, so that they will not be entirely opened or c'osed under varying climatic-conditions'.

This may be done in the present invention through the use of a pair of adjustable slides orstops 27 and 28, the former adapted to limit the upward movement of the lever 22 'and consequently the extent of closing of the panels, while the latter slide 28 is designed to limit the downward movement of the lever and the extent of opening' of the panels. These slides are mountedin a 'cas ing 29 which is suitably secured to the inner face of the frame 1,' and they are retained in adjusted position by leaf springs 30 interposed between the edges of the slides and The casing has a-slot31 through which the lever 22'extends. The'slide 27 also has a slot 32 through which the lever extends and into which the head 33- or stop proper on e I 1 l 0 the sides ofthe casing, as shown 1n Fig; 10.

the slide 28 projects. The slide 28 has a slot 34 registering with the slot 32 but of differ ent width.

' The slide 27 has also {a head or stop proper 35, which may project into the slot 31 in the casing 29. The slides may be adjusted vertically by means of pinions or gears. 36 and 3-7 meshing respectively with racks 38 and 39 on opposite edges of the .slots 32- and 34. nThe" gear 36. is mounted on a tubular spindle 40.journaled at 41 in the casing 29, and having a milled head 42 for rotating said spindle and gear. The gear 37 is mounted on a spindle 13 running through the hollow spindle 4:0 and carrydown in the recess 5.6 by means the frame 1. recess there is adjustably arranged a vert1-' 1 ing a milled head 44 for rotating' said gear. In this way the upper and lower stops 33 and 34 may be readily adjusted by rotating the corresponding heads 42 and 4.4. The lever 22 may be provided with a buffer 45 of rubber or other suitable material to prevent direct contact between the said lever and the .stops 33 and 34 and eliminate Objectionable noise of metal striking against metal which would be caused thereby. Any or all other striking parts of the device may also be equipped with bufiers or sound deadeners, if desired.

At the inner edge of the opening 2 grooves 46 and 47, Figs. 4 and 5, are provided for the insertion of a sash 48 and a screen 19, respectively. It will be understood that either the screen or sash or both may be used or not as maybe desired. a When the sash is used it may be fastened at any point by a wedge-shaped clamp block 50, having 52 in a metal frame 53 surrounding the opening 2 in the frame 1, as also shown in- I 59 on the panels, so that sudden temperature 'changes w ll not cause the latter to be Fig. 3.

Referring to structure of the ventilator thereshown is the same as already described except that -tion', what I claim as new and desire to additional mechanism isprovided for antomatically actuating the panels-according to the temperature. The rock shaft 19 is provided with an extension 54: having a crank arm 55 housed in the upper end por tion of a vertical recess 56 in the side of In the lower part of said cal tube 57 containing a suitable amount of mercury rod 59 is supported on thesurface of the mercury by a float 60, and the upper end of said weight is connected to the crank arm ,55 by a coiled spring 61 and wire62. The

tube 57 may be adjusted bodily up and of a spindle 63 carrying a milled knob 64 at its outer end and a gear 65 on-its innerend portion, said gear meshing with a rack 66 on the tube. I

By this means the tube may be adjusted as desired to correspond with normal temperatures, so that when the temperature fluctuates the rise or fall of the mercury will raise or lower. the weight 59 and act upon the rock shaft- 19 through the spring 61 and wire ventilator toward open or closed position.

nicely by the counterbalance 23 and weight 59 that the raising of said weight will bring the counterbalance 23 into play to move the panels of the weight 59 will exert suflicient pull on the arm 55 to Y. overcome the counterbalance .matically closed protect sleepers from itaining. portion of the tube 57. A trans- -'observed ontheposition of said arm. The

Figs. 11 to 14, inclusivepthe 58. A weight} in, the form of weight adjustable vertically and horizon- 62, to move the'panels of the -'tion with-a panelpivoted to swing on a The rock shaft is normally balanced so toward open position, while the fall and swing the panels toward closed position. i In this way a drop-in temperature will automatically result infully or partially closuseful in Northern States where considerable changes in temperature occur during the night, and the'ventilator may be autothecold and opened again to admit air when w the temperature moderates.

- 'The spindle 63 may extend through i a metal plate 67 secured to the inner face of the frame 1. The lower end portion of the recess 56 is in communication with the outerside of the, frame through a bore or openm'g68, Fig. '13, so that the outsidetemperature may act directly upon the mercury con-.

parent panel 69 is preferably placed on the inside of the frame 1 opposite the crank arm 55, so that-when the mercury tube is adjusted, the result of such adjustment may be spring 61 cushions the action of the weight broken.

Having thus fully described my invensecure by Letters Patent is 1. In a window ventilator, the combination with a movable panel, of means for counterbalancing said panel for normally holding under the action of high winds, said counterbalancing means exerting a greater levera e as the panel becomes farther open for tide purposespecified.

In. a window ventilator, the combination-with a panel pivoted to swing on a horizontal axis, of a rock shaft having a crank arm, means of connection between said crank arm and the panel, a lever secured. to, said rock shaft, and a counterbalancing weight adjustable vertically on said lever for tally on said lever for the purpose specified.

4. In a window ventilator, the combina- 5. In a window ventilator, the combina- 130 it in open position but permitting it to close tion with a panel pivoted to swing on a horizontal axis, of a rock shaft having a crank both diI'GOtlOllS."

1 arm, means of. connection between said crank arm and of the panel, a lever secured to said rock shaft, a counterbalancing weighton said lever, and adjustable stops for limitin the movement of said lever in 6.'In a window ventilator, the combination with a panel pivoted to swing on a horizontal axis, of a rock shaft having a crank arm, .means of connection between said crankarm and the panel,'a lever secured to said rock shaft, a counterbalancing Weight on said lever, adjustable stops for limiting the movement of the lever in opposite directions, racks on said stops, and. concentric gears for actuating said racks.

7. In a window ventilator, the combination with a'panel pivoted to swing on a horizontal axls, of a rock shaft having a crank arm, means of connection between said crank arm and. the panel, a lever secured to said rock shaft," :1 counterbalancing weight on said lever, adjustable stops for,

limiting the movement of the lever in oppo site directions, racks on said stops, concentric gears for actuating said racks, a spindle for rotating one of said gears, and a tubular spindle surrounding the first mentioned spindle for rotating the other gear."

8. In 'awindow ventilator, the combinationwith a panel pivoted to swing 'on a horizontal axis, of a rockshaft having a crank arm, means of connection between sa1d crank arm and the panel, a lever sefcured to said "rock shaft, a counterbalancing weight on said lever, an adjustable slide I havinga slot through which the lever extendsand which serves as a stop for limiting the movement of the lever in one direction, and another adjustable slide havinga justing the slides 10. In a window ventilator, the combinetion w th a panel p voted to swing on a hor? portion arranged in the slot of the first slide to. serve as a stop for limiting the move ment of the lever in the opposite direction. 9. In a window ventilator, the combination with a panel pivoted to swing on a hori-' zontal axis, of a rock shaft having a crank arm, means of connection between said crank arm and the panel, a lever secured to said rock'shaft a counterbalancing weight on said lever, a11- adjustable slide having a .slot through which the lever extends and which serves as a stop for limiting the movement ofthe lever-in one direction, another adjustable slide adapted to serve as a stop 'for limiting the movement of the lever in" the opposite direction, the second slide also having a slot in line with the slot in the first slide, racks on opposite edges of'said slots. and gears meshing with said racks for adzontal axis, of a rock shaft having a .c'rank arm, means of connectlon between sa1d cran'k arm and the panel, a lever seeured'to said rock shaft, a counterbalancing weight on said lever, adjustable slides carrylng stops for limitingthe movement of the lever,

a casing for housing said slides, means for adjusting the slidesin the casing, and leaf springs interposed between the slides and.

tween said weight and thepanel for movingthe latter toward open or closed position as the mercury rises or falls.

12. In a window ventilator, the combina= tionrwith a movable panel, of a mercury tube, a weight in said tube, a float supporting the weight on the surface of the mer cury, operative means of connection between said weight and the panel for moving the latter toward open or closed position as the mercury rises or falls, and means for adjusting the mercury tube vertically for the purpose specified.

13. In a window ventilator, the combina-- tion with a movable panel, of means for counterbalancing said panel for yieldingly holding it in open position, a mercury tube, a float on the surface of the mercury in the tube, and means of connection between the floatand counterbalancing means, including a coiled spring for the purpose specified.

14. In a window ventilator,-the 'combination with a frame, of a plurality of "panels pivoted in said frame, strips pivotally connecting the panels together for causing 'them to move in unison, and flanges on said strips to overlap the frame, when the panels are closed," for the purpose specifiedn 15. In a window ventilator, the combination with a frame having grooves in its edges, of a plurality of panels pivoted in Said frame, strips pivotally connecting the panelstogether'for causing them to move in unison, and flanges on said strips to overlap the edges of the frame and engage in the grooves therein, "whenthe panels are closed, for the purpose specified,

16. In a window ventilator, the combine tion with a frame having an undercut recess in its upper edge with a groove in its'face,

of a panel pivoted'in the frame to swing on a horizontal axis and having its upper edge adapted to enter said recess in the frame when the panel is closed," anda strip arranged along the upper edge'of the panel to engage the groovein the face of the recess for the purpose specified.

VICTOR'M,

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2502736 *Dec 22, 1948Apr 4, 1950Marcoe Reuben JIntake vent
US2595885 *Jun 12, 1947May 6, 1952Rhoades Raymond LVentilation
US2602390 *Nov 8, 1946Jul 8, 1952Whissel Samuel HVentilator
US2796640 *Jun 13, 1955Jun 25, 1957White William PInterlocking metal weather stripping for jalousie windows
US2845153 *Apr 26, 1954Jul 29, 1958Protex Weatherstrip Mfg CoWindow structures
US2889763 *Sep 12, 1956Jun 9, 1959Wilbur M PineBuilding ventilating apparatus
US2903257 *May 3, 1955Sep 8, 1959Perrone Ruben OSimultaneous control mechanism for shutter forming laths
US3436016 *Dec 12, 1967Apr 1, 1969Edwards Ralph STemperature responsive ventilator with coiled leaf spring
US4644990 *Sep 3, 1985Feb 24, 1987William F. DunnAutomatic closing system for window blinds
US4962882 *Nov 27, 1989Oct 16, 1990Sarazen Jr Paul MVentilator
US5253804 *May 12, 1992Oct 19, 1993Sarazen Jr Paul MTemperature and humidity sensitive high efficiency exhaust ventilator apparatus
US5294049 *Feb 22, 1993Mar 15, 1994Temp-Vent CorporationPower temp vent duct system
US5360372 *Mar 30, 1992Nov 1, 1994Gpac, Inc.Control system for doors of a negative air pressure enclosure
US5957373 *Jan 12, 1998Sep 28, 1999Temp-Vent CorporationAutomatic ventilator with manual override
Classifications
U.S. Classification49/2, 454/221, 236/49.5, 160/6, 160/91, 49/21, 160/3
International ClassificationE06B7/084, E06B7/02
Cooperative ClassificationE06B7/084
European ClassificationE06B7/084