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Publication numberUS1337278 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 20, 1920
Filing dateMay 28, 1919
Priority dateMay 28, 1919
Publication numberUS 1337278 A, US 1337278A, US-A-1337278, US1337278 A, US1337278A
InventorsSchulz Gustav Otto
Original AssigneeSchulz Gustav Otto
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process of vacuum-receptacle construction
US 1337278 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

G. o. SCHULZ. PROCESS 0F VACUUM RECEPTACLE CONSTRUCTION. APPLICATION FILED MAY28, I9I9.

1,337,278. Patented Apr. 20, 1920.

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G. O. SCHULZ. PROCESS OF VACUUM RECEPTACLE CONSTRUCTION. APPLICATION FILED IIIAYZB. I9I9.

1,337,2'7 8. Patented Apr. 20, 1920.

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GUSTAV OTTO SCHULZ, 0F REVERE, MASSACHUSETTS.

PROCESS 0F VACUUM-RECEPTACLE CONSTRUCTION.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Apr. 20, 1920.

Application led May 28, 1919. Serial No. 300,287'.

b all whom t may Conce/rn.'

Be it known that I, GUsTi-iv OTTO SCHULZ, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Revere, in the county of Suffolk and State of Massachusetts, have invented an Improvement in Processes of Vacuum-Receptacle Construction, of which the following description, in connection with the accompanying drawings, is a specification, like characters on the drawings representing like parts.

rThis application is in part a continuation of my copending application Serial No. 276,811, filed February 18, 1919, now Patent No. 1,307,793, June 24, 1919.

This invention relates to the process of vacuum receptacle construction for various purposes, and more particularly for tireless cookers, ice cream cabinets, etc., and also to wall construction of containers, which in the disclosed emboeiment of means for practising the invention are typified by sections of walls for vessels adapted to receive a refrigerant and articles to be subjected to refrigerating action.

.In order that the principle of the invention may be readily understood, I have disclosed in the accompanying drawings certain adaptations of or means for practising my invention, to the-use of which, however, my invention is in no wise limited.

In said drawings:

Figure 1 is a horizontal section, and Figs. 2, 3 and i are vertical sections taken through a receptacle adapted to be used as a Jtireless cooker, ice cream cabinet, etc., said receptacles being shown in various stages of construction in accordance wit i my process;

Figs. 5 and 6 are perspective views showing vacuum receptacles adapted to be used as heat insulating` units for walls in different stages of construction; and

Figs. '7 and 8 are perspective views showing vacuum receptacles emploved to insulate wooden and concrete walls respectively.

I will describe certain embodiments of means for practising my process which may, however, be carried out in any other suitable or approved way.

In Fig. 1 I have shown in horizontal or cross section, and in Fig. 2 in longitudinal section, a hollow core. rlhis core is composed of inner and outer members or walls 1, 1, herein represented as cylindrical, and which are preferably, but not necessarily, formed of wood. Between the walls 1, 1, of the core are supporting or bracing strips 2 that may be of any suitable form, character, number and material. Preferably they are formed of wood. Having constructed a hollow core as shown in Figs. 1 and 2, I envelop the core by a hermetical barrier 3, indicated in Figs. 3 and 4. Such barrier is preferably, but not necessarily, of metal. Attached to or constituting an integral part with the hermetical barrier 3 is a preferably tubular projection e. In order to facilitate the creating of a vacuum between the members 1 of a hollow core, I provide an opening or passage 5 through the outer wall 1, thus creating communication between the tubular projection 4 andthe space between the members 1 of the core. The core having been enveloped by the hermetical barrier 3, a vacuum is created between the members 1 of the core preferably by connecting the tubular projection el to a vacuum pump. A vacuum having been established within the core 1, the latter is hermetically sealed by closing the passageway through the proj ection el in any suitable manner, as by means of a cap 6.

In Fig. el, I have shown a vacuum-insulated cover for the receptacle, indicated generally at 7.4 The process of constructing a cover is preferably similar to that of constructing the receptacle itself. The hollow core for the cover comprising the members 1a, 1a and the supporting or bracing strips 2a is enveloped by the hermetical barrier 3a. The upper member 1a is provided with a tubular projection da, which is in communication with a passage 5a through the said outer member 1a. A vacuum is established between said members 1il and the core is hermetically sealed by closing the passageway 5iL in any suitable manner, as by means of a cap 6a.

In Fig. 5, I have represented a hollow core composed of the members 1b, 1b between which are the supporting or bracing strips 2b. The hollow core is provided with an opening 5* establishing a passageway to the space between the members 1b.

The core thus constructed having been completed, it is covered by a hermetical barrier, preferably such as indicated at 3b in F ig. 6. Attached to or constituting an integral part of the hermetical barrier 3b is a tubular projection 1b. A vacuum is created within the said core and preferably by connecting the tubular projection 1b to a vacuum pump, and the core is thus her- 4metically sealed by closing the passageway through said projection 4b. The vacuum is sealed in any suitable manner, as by placing a cap upon said tubular projection.

Having completed the vacuum receptacle, it may be coated, if desired, with shellac, asphalt or any suitable cementitious material to prevent corrosion and to assist in making the receptacle impervious to air, thus safeguarding against any leakage that may occur on account of the seams or the porosity of the hermetical barrier that envelops the core of the receptacle. The enumerated enveloping materials constitute the preferred adhesive materials for this purpose. My invention is in no wise limited with respect to the size of the core, and any number of additional supports 2b may be added.

In Fig 7 I have represented a vacuum receptacle employed to insulate a hollow wall, as, for example, the floor and ceiling as well as the side walls of a receptacle of any size, or even of a building. The members 7 of said receptacle may be either the studs of a wall or the joists of a floor or ceiling. rlhe receptacle indicated at 3b is placed between the said members 8 and is then inclosed by the boards 9, or by any suitable covering, which is usually employed in the construction of walls. Any space that exists between the receptacle 3b and the covering 9 is preferably filled in with some cementitious material, such as asphalt or pitch., thus eliminating any possible condensation.

In Fig. 8, I have represented the vacuum receptacle 31 embedded in a concrete Wall 11. Any desirable 'method may be used in casting or molding the concrete 1`1 about the said receptacle 3b.

By enveloping a hollow core, as by a hermetical barrierand then creating a vacuum within the core, the pressure resisting qualities of cheap materials, such as wood, which are not impervious to air, can be utilized, and the use of glass and heavy iron heretofore necessary may be avoided. Consequently, the construction of vacuum receptacles is greatly simplified and made practicable from the commercial point of view.

Within the scope of my invention I may employ the following steps in the order enumerated and may form the receptacle or construction shown in Figs. .7 and S by such method; that is to say, I may envelop a hollow and preferably relatively rigid core by a hermetical barrier, such as indicated at 3b. I may then establish a vacuum within said core in any suitable manner. I may then hermetically seal the core, and I may then apply the concrete. or cementitious material about said hermetically sealed core. Such process constitutes a different species from that claimed in and broadly coveredby my said co-pending application Serial No. 276,811, and I desire to claim the same herein or in a suitable division of this application.

I-Iaving thus described several illustrative embodiments of means whereby my invention may be practised,'I desire it to be understood that although specific terms are employed, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense and not for purposes of limitation, the scope of the invention being set forth in the following claims.

Claims:

1. That process of vacuum-receptacle construction comprising the following steps; enveloping by a hermetical barrier a hollow core adapted to brace said barrier against atmospheric pressure consequent upon the establishment of a vacuum within said core, establishing a vacuum within said core, then hermetically sealing said core and then enveloping said core or barrier with or applying thereto concrete or cementitious material.

2. That process of wall or like construction comprising the following steps; enveloping a hollow, relatively rigid core by a hermetical barrier, then establishing a vacuum within said core, then hermetically sealing said core, and then applying to or enveloping said core and barrier with concrete or cementitious material.

3. That process of vacuum-receptacle construction comprising the following steps; enveloping by a hermetical barrier a core having means to brace said barrier against atmospheric pressure consequent upon the establishment of a vacuum within the core, then establishing a vacuum within the core, then hermetically sealing said core, and then applying to said core and barrier or enveloping the same with concrete or cementitious material.

4c. That process of vacuum receptacle construction comprising the following steps: enveloping by a hermetical barrier a core adapted to brace said barrier against atmospheric pressure consequent upon the establishment of a vacuum within the core, then creating a vacuum within said core, hermetically sealing the core, and then applying to or enveloping the barrier by a coat of adhesive material.

5. That process of vacuum receptacle construction comprising the following steps: enveloping by a hermetical barrier a core adapted to brace said barrier against atmospheric pressure consequent upon the establishment of a vacuum within the core, then creating a vacuum within said core, hermetically sealing the core and subsequent to the envelopment of said core by said barrier applying to or enveloping the barrier by a coat of adhesive material.

In testimony whereof, I have signed mv name to this specification. u

GUSTAV OTTO SCHULZ.

llO

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2657629 *Mar 17, 1949Nov 3, 1953Richard B GibsonWhisky aging vat
US4579249 *Jun 1, 1984Apr 1, 1986Union Carbide CorporationFiberglass insulation for mobile cryogenic tankage
US4646934 *Jan 21, 1986Mar 3, 1987Mcallister Ian RVacuum insulated shipping container and method
US4674674 *Apr 18, 1985Jun 23, 1987Union Carbide CorporationMethod for fabricating fiberglass insulated mobile cryogenic tankage
US4778078 *Mar 2, 1987Oct 18, 1988Danby Developments, Inc.Vacuum insulated shipping container and method
US4865014 *Feb 16, 1989Sep 12, 1989Nelson Thomas EWater heater and method of fabricating same
US4974551 *Aug 3, 1989Dec 4, 1990Nelson Thomas EWater heater and method of fabricating same
US5011729 *Nov 15, 1989Apr 30, 1991Mcallister Ian RVacuum insulated panels with concave surfaces on the surface layers
US20060000733 *Jul 2, 2004Jan 5, 2006Albritton Charles WRigid container with vacuum channel walls
US20060186125 *Feb 14, 2006Aug 24, 2006Stephen TewThermally insulating containers
WO1990009546A1 *Jan 16, 1990Aug 23, 1990Nelson Thomas EWater heater and method of fabricating same
WO2005016784A2 *Aug 3, 2004Feb 24, 2005Gasm LimitedThermally insulating containers
WO2005016784A3 *Aug 3, 2004Jun 16, 2005Gasm LtdThermally insulating containers
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/102, 215/12.1, 264/265, 220/592.27, 156/242, 220/917, 264/279
International ClassificationA47J41/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S220/917, A47J41/022
European ClassificationA47J41/02G