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Publication numberUS1338750 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 4, 1920
Filing dateFeb 4, 1918
Priority dateFeb 4, 1918
Publication numberUS 1338750 A, US 1338750A, US-A-1338750, US1338750 A, US1338750A
InventorsEdward V Schranck, Edward F Kunkel
Original AssigneeEdward V Schranck, Edward F Kunkel
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat-storing attachment for radiator systems
US 1338750 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. SCHRANCK AND E. F. KUNKEL. HEAT STOHING ATTACHMENT FOR RADIATOR SYSTEMS.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 4, 1918.

Patented May 4, 1920.

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@nomins ZBVTARD V. SCHRNCK AND EEN/WARD F HEAT-STRNG- ATTACHMENT R- assenso.

Specication of Letters Patents Patented May 929.

Application filed February 4, 1918. Serial No. 215,09

To all whom t may com-ern Be 'it known that we, EDWARD V; SGHRANCK and EDWARD l?. KUNKEL, citizens of the United States, residing at Milwaukee, county of Milwaukee and State of Wisconsin, have invented. new and useful improvements in Heat-Storing Attachments for Radiator' Systems, of which the following is a specification.

Our invention relates to improvements in heat-storing attachments for the water jackets and radiator systems of motor driven vehicles.

The object of our invention is to provide means for storing up heat when the engine is running and utilizing such stored heat to keep the water in the circulatory system of the motor at a moderate temperature sufficient to prevent freezing.

More particularly, the object is to provide means whereby the heat of the exhaust gases may be absorbed and stored in a storage chamber provided with steatite or any other material capable of absorbing a large number of heat units and allowing slow radiation on account of the slow heat conductivity of the material employed.

In the drawings,"

Figure l is a side elevation of an internal combustion motor provided with a water jacket and radiator and also equipped with our improved heat storing apparatus.

Fig. 2 is a detail view, in vertical section, of the heat storing chamber showing its water jacket and circulatory pipe connections.

Like parts are identified by the same reference characters in both views.

l is the exhaust pipe of an internal combustion engine and 2 is a radiator associated with the water jacket of the engine in the ordinary manner. When used in. connection with a motor driven vehicle, the engine is, of course., inclosed within the hood 4C.

A chamber 6 is mounted upon the exhaust pipe l, the bottom of the chamber t being preferably concave in form so as to 'snugly fit over the pipe 1. The chamber is provided with an i-nterior cavity 8 filled with steatite. or what is commonly known as soap stone, this preferably comprising a solid block 9. rlhis cavity 8 may be open at the bottom, whereby the block 9 may be allowed to bear directly on the exhaust pipe, the bottom of the block being hollowed out in concave form to fit the pipe. The chamber 6 also includes a water .cavity ll which is closed, except for a connection l2 with the water jacket of the internal combustion motor and another connection 13 leading to the main hot water pipe connection l5 of the radiator. third cavity 1T, within the chamber (5, is filled with a non-heat conducting material, such as dead air, felt. mineral wool, or any other material adapted to serve as a heat insulator.

lt will be understood that, when the engine is running, the stone 9 will absorb heat from the exhaust pipe l. lVlien the engine stops, a gravity circulation will be maintained through the radiator and the engine jacket, the water thus circulating passing through the cavity 1l and absorbing heat' from the steatite 9. As the temperature ofl the water in the system reduces, heat will be suppliedfromthe steatite block to a sufficient extent to keep the temperature above the freezing point through a `considerable period of time. Assuming that the hood is properly j acketed` as would be the case during freezing weather, it is possible to store suiiieient heat in the block 9 to keep the water in the system above the freezing point for ten or twelve hours during severe weather and for much longer periods during moderate winter weather.

The heat storing connection is preferably not included as a permanent feature of the circulatory s vstem of the engine, but is adapted for detachable connection therewith by the fittings l2 and 13 by which connection is made with the main line pipe or duct l5. thus allowing the water to pass either through the water heating cavity ll or through the main line duct l5.

In warm weather'. the connections l2 and 13 may be removed and the openings in the fittings l2 and 13 capped. The entire casting. composed of the soap stone 9, water chamber ll, and the outer chamber 17 may be removed.

ln cases where the engine is to lie idle in a cold place for a period of timue considerably in excess of that in which the steatite is capable of imparting warmth to the water, we may provide an electrical heating unit or plug 22. which may be inserted 'through the wall of the chamber into the water cavity.or into a socket in the steatite. The heating unit may beconnected with a source of electrical energy through wires 23.

`We do not wish to limit the scope of our invention to steatite, as any material capable of absorbing a large number of heat units may be substituted therefor without departing from the invention herein described.

It will be understood that the gravity circulation through the water cavity of my improved attachment will be slow and the heat absorption from-the block of steatite will also be slow, since the steatite is not in direct contact with the water. Since the rate of heat loss is reduced in proportion as the temperature of the radiator and engine body approximates that of the surrounding. atmosphere, it will readily be understood that the water in the radiator, water acket and the cavity l1 will be kept above the freezing point for la considerable time, depending largely upon the nature of the weather, and that the warmth imparted to the water by the block of steatite will be transmitted to all parts of the system by the slowly moving currents of water, thusvalso aiding starting operations of the engine.

We claim l. A heat storing attachment for water jacketed internal combustion engines, comprising the combination with said water jacket and connections, of a chamber through which the water may circulate, and a blockof steatitic material associated with said chamber and adapted to absorb heat when the engine is in operation and to give up heat to the surrounding water when the engine is at rest.

2. A heat storing attachment for internal combustion engines having a water circula-` tory system, com arising the combination of a block of heat, a sorbing material, a water jacket surrounding the block, an inclosing layer of non-heat conducting material, and pipe connections with the circulatory system adapted to allow water to circulate through said'water jacket.

3. A heat storing attachment for internal combustion engines having a water circulatory system, comprising the combination of a water chamber having detachable inlet and outlet connections with the circulatory system, a block of material inclosed by said chamber adapted to retain heat obtained from the engine when running, and impart heat to the water when the engine is stopped, and an auxiliary` connection around said water chamber, said block and water chamber being made detachable, whereby the same may be removed when desired.

4. The combination of a water jacketed internal combustion engine, of a radiator connected with said watenjacket, an auX- iliary heat storing chamber provided with a non-heat conducting covering, and means for slowly transmitting heat therefrom to the water in the radiator and engine acket.

5. The combination withv a water jacketed internal combustion engine provided with an exhaust pipe, of a radiator con nected for water circulation from the water jacket, a block of heat absorbing material mounted on the exhaust pipe, a heat insulating covering therefor, and means for slowly transmitting heat from said block of heat absorbing material to the water in the ra* diator and engine jacket.

6. The'combination with a water jacketed internal combustion engine provided with an exhaust pipe, of a radiator connected for water circulation from the water jacket, a

block of heat absorbing material mounted on the exhaust pipe, a heat insulating covering therefor, and means for slowly transmitting heat from said block of heat absorbing material o the water in the radiator and engine jacket, omprising a water chamber partially inclosing said block of heat absorbing material, and connections adapted to permit water circulation between said chamber and the radiator.

In testimony whereof we affix our signatures in the presence of two witnesses.

EDWARD V. SCHRANCK. EDWARD F. KUNKEL. Witnesses:

FREDERICK W. NoL'rE, ALICE J. MCKERIHAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3381113 *Sep 29, 1964Apr 30, 1968Albright & Wilson Mfg LtdHeat storage apparatus
US3974642 *Jan 18, 1974Aug 17, 1976Fives-Cail Babcock Societe AnonymeHybrid cycle power plant with heat accumulator for storing heat exchange fluid transferring heat between cycles
US4057101 *Mar 10, 1976Nov 8, 1977Westinghouse Electric CorporationHeat sink
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/142.50R, 126/400, 219/202
International ClassificationF02N19/10
Cooperative ClassificationF02N19/10
European ClassificationF02N19/10