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Publication numberUS1338813 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 4, 1920
Filing dateDec 28, 1918
Priority dateDec 28, 1918
Publication numberUS 1338813 A, US 1338813A, US-A-1338813, US1338813 A, US1338813A
InventorsChiarelli Anthony
Original AssigneeChiarelli Anthony
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mechanical roller-skate
US 1338813 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. CHIARELLI.

MECHANICAL ROLLER SKATE. APPLICATION FILED DEC.28, 191s.

Patented May 920.

EETS-S EE l/VVEN TOR A. CHIARELLI.

MECHANICAL ROLLER SKATE.

APPLICATION FILED 050.28, 1918.

Patented May 4, 1920..

5 SHEETS-SHEET 2- A. CHIARELLI.

MECHANICAL ROLLER SKATE.

APPLICATION FILED 050.23, ms.

I 1,333,313. Patented May 4,1920.

5 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

i3 3 5 2 J3 5 L l //V VE N 70/? A. CHIARELLI. MECHANl-CAL ROLLER SKATE.

APPLICATION FILED DEC.28, 1918.

Patented May 4, 1920.

5 SHEET$-SHEET 4.

ANTHONY CHIARELLI, OF NEW YORK, N". Y.

MECHANICAL ROLLER-SKATE.

Application filed. December 28, 1918.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, ANTHONY CHIARELLI, a citizen of the United States, residing at New York city, county and State of New York, have invented a new and useful Improvement in Mechanical Roller-Skates, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to a mechanically operated roller skate in which the weight of the user is employed to operate mechanism to propel the skate forward.

The invention has for an object to provide a skate of this type which may be operated with a minimum exertion on the part of the user, permitting the attainment of high traveling speed.

A further object is to provide a skate which can be readily controlled by the user without the necessity of considerable initial practice.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

Figure 1 of the drawings is a side elevation of my improved skate with the operating pedal in raised position.

Fig. 2 is a plan view thereof with the operating pedal depressed.

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal section on the line 3--3 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a transverse section on the line H of Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary horizontal section on the line 55 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a detail transverse section on the line 6-6 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 7 is a horizontal section on the line 77 of Fig. 6.

Fig. 8 is a view of a modified form of mounting for the rear wheel.

Figs. 9 and 10 are diagrammatic side and plan views of a modified application of the invention.

Referring now to Figs. 1 to 7 improved skate comprises a pair of side frame members 1 rigidly connected by the transverse supports of which there are here shown three, numbered 3, 3 and 3". The side frame members may be cast or stamped as desired, while the transverse members may each be of the construction shown in Fig. 5, and comprising a length of tubing having Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented May 4, 1920.

Serial No. 268,672.

perforated plugs 4 fixed in their ends into which are threaded screws 5 passing through suitable openings in the side frame members. lVith this construction a light yet rigid, frame is provided.

My improved skate is preferably provided with five running wheels comprising a front pair 6, an intermediate pair 7 and a central rear wheel 8. The wheels 6 and 7 are jour naled in the side frames v1 while the rear Wheel 8 is carried by the operating pedal, as will be presently pointed out.

In this embodiment of my invention the operating power is applied to the front wheels 6. The operating mechanism comprises a plate 9 upon which the foot of the user is placed and which may be provided with the front and rear devices 10 and 11 (such as ordinary roller skates are equipped with) for attachment to the foot of the user. This plate I term the operating pedal.

This operating pedal is pivotally mounted on the free ends of a series of links of which there are a front pair 12 and a rear pair 13. To effect this pivotal mounting the plate may be provided with the bearing lugs 14 to which the ends of the links 12 and 13 are pivoted as at 15. The opposite ends of the links 12 are pivoted on a transverse shaft 16 which is journaled at its ends in the side frames 1, while the corresponding ends of the links 13 are pivoted on a transverse shaft 17 fixed at its ends to the side frames. Each pair of links may be braced together by the supports 18 similar to the supports 3.

The shaft 16 has fixed thereon a ratchet wheel 20 which is engaged by a pawl 21, mounted on a cylindrical. bar 22 fixed at its opposite ends to the links 12, and pressed against the ratchet wheel by the spring 22 When the operating pedal is moving from its raised to its depressed position (which movement constitutes its operating stroke) the pawl 21 engages and rotates the ratchet wheel 20 but when the operating pedal is returning to raised position, the pawl rides over the ratchet wheel, as will be apparent.

I prefer to provide means for automatically returning the operating pedal to raised position, this being here effected by means of tension springs 23 secured to the front pair of links 12, while the rear links may be pressed upwardly by springs 24 (only one of which is shown) coiled upon the shaft 17.

A suitable stop is provided to hold the links in a position inclining upwardly and rearwardly as shown in Fig. 1. In the present instance this stop is constituted by the cylindrical cross bars 3. I prefer also to provide a means whereby the upward movement of the links may be limited at different points so that the length of stroke of the operating pedal may be varied when desired. This is here effected by means of a stepped collar slidable on the stop bar and which may be moved longitudinally on the latter to have anyone of its steps interposed between the link 12 and the stop bar, a set screw 31 holding the collar in position.

Motion is imparted from the shaft operated by ratchet 21, to a shaft 32 upon which the front wheels 6 are mounted by means of suitable multiplying gearing. In order that the gear ratio may be readily changed to provide a high or low gearing as desired, 1. have provided two alternative trains of gears between the shafts 16 and 32, each train being mounted on one of the side frames 2, and being inclosed by a suitable casing 1.

The train of gears for the high gearing is shown in Fig. 1 and the train of gears for the low gearing in Fig. 3. The first train comprises a large gear 33 on the shaft 16 and meshing with a pinion 34 fixed on a stub shaft 35 on which is a large gear 36 meshing with an idler 37 which meshes also with a' pinion 38, fixed on the shaft 32. The other train of gears comprises a gear 40 on shaft 16 which meshes with a smaller gear 41 on a stub shaft 42 on which is also fixed a gear 43 meshing with an idler 44 which meshes in turn with a pinion 45 fixed on the shaft 32. By comparing the relative sizes of the gear 33 and pinion 34 with the relative sizes of the gears 40 and 41, it will be apparent that a lower gear ratio is provided by the second train of gears.

To enable either of these trains of gears to be connected as desired to the operating pedal the initial gears 33 and 46 of each train are loose upon the shaft 16 and areadapted to be secured to the latter by the set screws 46 and 47 carried by the hubs 33 and 40 of the gears 33 and 40.

The rear central wheel 8 is mounted to rotate freely on a shaft 48, fixed at its ends in lateral extensions 13*, formed integrally with the links 13. The wheel 8 may be localized on the shaft by the collars 49 fixed to the latter;

To enable the skate to be steered at will, I have provided the control device for the intermediate wheels 7 illustrated more particularly in Figs. 6 and 7. Thesewheels are mounted on a shaft 50 which passes freely through bearing blocks 51 slidable in slots 52 in the side frames. This shaft also passes at its center through the bearing 53 having an integral horizontal disk 54 upon which rests a second disk 55 carried on a transverse frame member 56 which is carried by the side frames 1 and 2. A king bolt 57 fixed at its lower end to the bearing 53 extends upwardly through the disk 55 and is provided on its end with the usual nut, washer and cotter pin attaching means indicated at 58. The shaft 50 is prevented from longitudinal movement by collars 59 fixed thereon adjacent the bearing 53. V

The disk 54 has formed thereon anintegral worm segment 60 meshing with a worm pinion 61 fixed on a stub shaft 62 car ried by the frame member 56. Upon one end of the stub shaft 62 is a drum 63 and on its opposite end a coiled'spring 64 connected at opposite ends to the shaft 62 and member 56 in a well known manner to normally tend to rotate the pinion 61 in one direction.

Slidably carried by the frame member 56 and disk 55 is a vertical pin 66 which is pressed downwardly into a suitable registering aperture in the disk 54by the spring 67.

A bell crank lever 68, pivoted as at 69 to the transverse frame member 56, engages at one end under the hooked upper end of the pin 66 and is provided at its other end with a pulley 70. A cord or chain 72 is secured at one end to the drum 63 and passes up over the pulley and then downwardly, over the pulley 71, and finally upwardly, through a suitable opening 74 in the frame 56, to be held in the hand of'the operator.

To enable the skate to be stopped or slowed down as required, I have applied a brake to the shaft 50. The brake proper may be of the usual band type and is shown at 76 and is connected to one end of a bell crank lever 77 having a sliding pivotal connection 78 with the side frame 1 and connected at its other end by a cord 79 with a ring 80 in which a chain or cord, held by the operator may be clipped.

The operation of my improved skate is as follows: When the weight of the operator is placed on the operating pedal the latter is forced downwardly and rearwardly, the links 12 and 13 swinging on the shafts 16 and 17. The pawl 21 causes the ratchet wheel 20 to rotate and operate whichever train of gears has been connected by its set screw to the shaft 16. Shaft 32 and wheels 6 will be thus rotated in a direction to im part a forward rolling movement, the only purpose of the idler gears 37 and 44 being to cause the proper motion to be transmitted to the wheels. The wheel 8 finally touches the ground, but just previous to this the links 12 rest upon enlargements 3 of the cross member 3 and since the center of weight is now to the rear of the wheels 7 as will be apparent from Fig. 3 the front wheels 6 are lifted sufficiently to clear the ground, thus permitting steering of the skate when the operating pedal is either king" bolt 57.

lifted or depressed. Steering is effected as follows: The apertures in the disks 54 and 55 in which the pin 66 engages register when the wheels 7 are central. The spring 64 acts to rotate the worm pinion 61 in one direction, while the cord 72 is wound upon the drum 63 in a manner to cause its pull to rotate the worm pinion in an opposite direction. WVhen the cord is pulled the pin 66 is first lifted out of the disk by the bell crank. A further pulling of the cord will then rotate the pinion 64 and cause the shaft 50 to swing around the axis of the When the cord is released the spring 64 reverses the worm pinion and the shaft 50 swings back and the pin 66 drops into the disk 54. To steer in an opposite direction just sufficient pull is given the cord to release the pin 66. The cord is then slackened and the spring 64 rotates the pinion, while a pull on the cord returns the wheels to central position. It will be apparent that the spring 64 is of much greater strength than the spring 67.

In Fig. 8 I have shown a caster form of mounting for the rear wheel 8. The wheel is here pivoted at the end of the rearwardly projecting bracket 85 pivoted to swing horizontally on a vertical bolt 86 passing through a cross piece 87 carried by the links 88, only one of which is shown, which correspond to the links 13.

In Figs. 9 and 10 I have shown diagrammatically an embodiment of my invention 1, applied in a pedomotor, of the type more particularly employed by children in play. As here shown a platform 90 is mounted on a single front wheel 91 and a pair of rear wheels 92, the front wheel being steered in the usual manner by the post 93. -An operating pedal 94 is carried by the front and rear links 95 and 96, the latter of which is fixed to a shaft 97. This shaft has an ordinary type of one way bicycle connection with a gear 98 mounted thereon. The gear 98 meshes with a pinion 99 fixed on a shaft 100 to which is also fixed a sprocket wheel 101 connected by a sprocket chain 102 with a sprocket wheel 103 fixed on the shaft 104 on which the rear wheels 92 are fixed. A spring 105 returns the operating pedal to a raised position. WVhen depressed the pedal 94 is stopped by the projections 106 on the platform 90.

It will be apparent that various other changes and modifications may be made in the invention as herein disclosed without departing from the spirit of the invention, and the right is reserved to all changes and modifications coming within the scope of the appended claims. It is further to be understood that' the term mechanically operated skate is to include pedomotors, such as illus- What I claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is as follows:

1. A mechanically operated skate comprising a frame, running wheels on which said frame is mounted an operating pedal, oscillatory links on which said pedal is mounted an operative connection between said oscillatory links and one of said running wheels, said links being adapted to swing downwardly and rearwardly from a substantially upright position to operate the skate, and springs acting to automatically return said links to their starting position.

2. A mechanically operated skate comprising a frame including a pair of side plates, running wheels on which said frame is mounted, an operating pedal, and two trains of gears of different ratios between said pedal and one of said running wheels, one of said trains of gears being carried upon and extending along one of said side plates, the other train of gears being carried upon and extending along the other side plate.

3. A mechanically operated skate com prising a frame, running wheels on which said frame is mounted, an operating pedal, a wheel carried by said pedal and adapted to bear on the ground when the pedal is depressed, and an operative connection between said pedal and one of said running wheels.

4. A mechanically operated skate comprising a frame, running wheels on which said frame is mounted, an operating pedal, pairs of links hinged at one end to front and rear of said pedal and at opposite ends to said frame, a wheel carried by the rear pair of links and adapted to run on the ground when the operating pedal is depressed a one way operating connection between the front pair of links and one of said running wheels, and means acting to automatically raise said operating pedal from depressed position.

5. A mechanically operated skate comprising a frame, running wheels on which said frame is mounted, an operating pedal, means for adjusting the stroke of said pedal, and an operative connection between said pedal and one of said operating wheels.

6. A mechanically operated skate comprising a frame, a front pair of wheels and a rear pair of wheels mounted in said frame,

an operating pedal adapted to work by swinging bodily downward and backward, a wheel carried by said operating pedal and providing an additional rear running wheel when the pedal is fully depressed, the final downward movement of said operating pedal under pressure causing the forward end of said frame to tilt upward to raise the front wheels from the ground.

7. A mechanically operated skate comprising a frame, a front pair of wheels and a rear pair of wheels mounted in said frame,

an operating pedal adapted to work by swinging bodily downward and backward, a wheel carried by said operating pedal and providing an additional rear running wheel when the pedal is depressed fully, the final downward movement of said operating pedal under pressure causing the forward end of said frame to tilt upward to raise the front wheels from the ground, and steering means applied; to the said rear pair of wheels.

8. A mechanically operated skate comprising a frame, front and rear running wheels on which said frame is mounted, an operating pedal, front and rear oscillatory links on which said pedal is mounted, a shaft to which the front oscillatory links are pivoted, means providing a one way connection between the front oscillatory links and the said shaft, two trains of gears of different ratios between said shaft and the front running wheels, and means for connecting or disconnecting either of said trains of gears with the said shaft.

9. Steering mechanism for mechanical roller skates comprising a segmental rack operatively connected to one of the wheel shafts, means operable by the user for turning said rack for steering purposes, means for rigidly holding said rack in a central position, said means being releasable automatically by operation of the first means.

10. Steering mechanism for mechanical roller skates, comprising a segmental'rack operatively connected to one of the wheel shafts, means operable by the user for turning said rack for steering purposes, and removable means for rigidly holding said rack in a central position.

11. Steering mechanism for mechanical roller skates comprising a king bolt, a bearing for one of the wheel shafts having the king bolt fixed thereto, a segmental rack rigidly secured to said bearing, a pinion supported by the frame of the skate engaging and adapted to operate said rack, and means operable by the user for turning said pinion and operating said rack for steering purposes.

12. Steering mechanism for mechanical roller skates comprising a king bolt rigidly secured to one of the wheel shafts, a segmental rack rigidly secured to said king V bolt, a pinion supported by the frame of the skate engaging and adapted to operate said rack, and removable means for holding said rack in a central position.

In testimony whereof, ANTHONY CHIA- RELLI' has signed his name to this specification, in the presence of a subscribing witness, this 4th day of June, 1918.

ANTHONY OHIARELLT Witness: 7 v

THos. HOWARD.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4706974 *Feb 26, 1987Nov 17, 1987Vincent Yvon MRoller skate
US6065759 *Sep 24, 1998May 23, 2000American Composites CorporationJump skate
US6336643 *May 2, 2000Jan 8, 2002American Composites CorporationJump skate
US7568706Sep 13, 2006Aug 4, 2009Kenneth Yat Chung NgMechanism for conversion of vertical force to a torque and motive device and method employing same
US7866672 *May 17, 2007Jan 11, 2011Adolf BrunnerSkate propulsion mechanisms
US20120228045 *Aug 23, 2011Sep 13, 2012Happylife Co., Ltd.Inline skate including a wheel-driving unit
WO1993001870A1 *Jul 9, 1992Feb 4, 1993Roller Products CorpHuman-powered skateboard like vehicle
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/11.115, 114/65.00A
International ClassificationA63C17/12
Cooperative ClassificationA63C17/12
European ClassificationA63C17/12