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Publication numberUS1340149 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 18, 1920
Filing dateJun 9, 1919
Priority dateJun 9, 1919
Publication numberUS 1340149 A, US 1340149A, US-A-1340149, US1340149 A, US1340149A
InventorsBrowne Vere B
Original AssigneeBrowne Vere B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Manufacture of steel sheets
US 1340149 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

V. B. BROWNE.

MANUFACTURE OF STEEL SHEETS.

APPLICATION HLED JUNE 9.1919.

1,340,149, Patehted May 18, 1920.

WITNESSES IN VENTOR $26WM M xfiti VERE B. BROWN E, OF TARENTUM, PENNSYLVANIA.

MANUFACTURE OF STEEL SHEETS.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented May 18, 1920.

Application filed June 9, 1919. Serial No. 302,913.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, Vans B. linowxn, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of 'larentum, in the county of Allegheny and State of Pennsylvania, have made a new and useful Invention in the Manufacture of Steel Sheets, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to the manufacture of steel sheets of extreme thinness.

For a number of years attempts have been made by hot rolling methods to manufacture steel sheets of extreme thinness, that is sheets of 2/ 1000 of an inch and less. In certain of the arts there is a growin demand for such steel sheets and so far as know no one, in this country .at least, has been able to produce the same commercially.

In certain branches of the electrical art there is a demand for such sheets made from silicon steel and there is also a demand for sheets made from mild steel.

An object of this invention is to provide a method whereby steel of any desired analysis may be commercially rolled into sheets of 2/1000 of an inch and less in thickness.

This, as Well as other objects which will readily appear to those skilled in the art of making steel sheets, I attain in the method hereinafter set forth.

In rolling these extremely thin sheets under standard sheet or tin mill practice to less than 6/1000 of an inch in thickness it is impossible to separate the sheets without tearing them.

The drawing is a sectional elevation showing a pack formed according to a preferred form of my method.

My method consists in utilizing any standard sheet or tin mill practice to produce sheets of the desired analysis and approximately 6/1000 of an inch in thickness. Such sheets are then taken separately and placed between relatively heavy sheets of steel of different general characteristics: that is a pack of any desired number of sheets is built up of sheets of the special steel alternating with relatively heavy sheets of steel having different eneral characteristics and the built-up pac is then rolled to length thus reducingthe special or inner sheets to the desired thinness.

I have found that a desirable method is to bring the relatively heavy sheets to rolling temperature and to alternate these with sheets of the special steel in a cold state. The special steel sheets take up suflicient heat from the relatively heavy hot sheets for rolling. If desired this built-up pack may consist of but three sheets, one relatively thin sheet in a cold state of the special steel sandwiched between two relatively thick sheets of dissimilar steel which have been brought to rolling temperature. Instead of placing the special steel sheets in a cold state between relatively heavy sheets brought to rolling temperature the pack which may consist of any suitable number of sheets may be built-up and then brought to rolling temperature (preferably a low rolling temperature). These built-up packs may be worked under any of the standard mill methods and if desired may be doubled or otherwise manifolded according to any of the approved methods. If doubled the pack after being-rolled to length will be sheared and opened in the usual way.

On account of having the special sheets arranged alternately with heavier sheets of dissimilar steel the separation of the finished sheets is readily affected since the dissimilar sheets under the rolling will not weld with the special sheets, neither will the surface tension or other forces tending to hold the sheets together be great enough to cause the sheets to tear during separation.

If the special sheets are silicon steel the sheets with which they alternate may be mild steel and if the special sheets are mild steel the sheets with which they alternate may be silicon steel. It is always necessary to see that the sheets on the outside of the pack are the relatively heavy sheets.

Having thus described my invention What I claim is- 1. The method of rolling extremely thin sheets of steel, which consists in producing a relatively thin sheet, in sandwiching said sheet between sheets of steel of heavier gage and different general characteristics and then in hot rolling the sandwiched sheets to such length as to give the desired thickness to the inner sheet.

2. The method of rolling extremely thin sheets of silicon steel, which consists in producing a relatively thin sheet, in sandwiching said sheet between two sheets of steel of heavier gage and different general characteristics and then in hot rolling the sandwiched sheets to such length as to give the desired thickness to the inner sheet.

3. The method of rolling an extremely thin sheet of metal, which consists in placing a relatively thin sheet of such metal in a cold state between two heavier sheets of metal having dissimilar characteristics and brought to a rolling temperature and then in reducing the gage of the three-ply pack.

4. The method of rolling sheets of steel of 2/1000 of an inch or less in thickness, which consists in producing a sheet no thicker than 14/1000 of an inch, in sandwiching said sheet between two sheets of steel of heavier gage and then in hot rolling the sandwiched sheets to such length as will give the desired thickness to the inner sheet.

5. The method of rolling sheets of steel of 2/1000 of an inch or less in thickness, which consists in producing a sheet no thicker than 14/1000 of an 1I1Cl1, in sandwiching said sheet while cold between two hot sheets of steel of heavier gage and having different characteristics therefrom and then in reducing the sandwiched sheets to such length as will give the desired thickness to the inner sheet.

6. The method of rolling extremely thin sheets of silicon steel, which consists in producing a relatively thin sheet, in sandwiching said sheet while cold between two heated sheets of steel having different characteristics and of heavier gage and then in rolling the sandwiched sheets to such length as to give the desired thickness to the inner sheet.

7. The method of rolling extremely thin sheets of steel, which consists in alternating cold relatively thin sheets with heavier sheets of steel of different characteristics raised to rolling temperature, and then in rolling the multi-ply pack to produce sheets of the desired gage.

8. The method of rolling extremely thin sheets of steel, which consists in alternating cold relatively thin sheets with heavier sheets of dissimilar steel raised to rolling temperature, and then in rolling the niulti-ply pack to produce sheets of the desired gage.

9. The method of rolling an extremely thin sheet of metal, which consists in placing a relatively thin sheet of such metal in a cold state between two heavier sheets of other metal in a heated state and then in reducing the gage of the three-ply pack.

10. The method of rolling an extremely thin sheet of metal, which consists in placing a relatively thin sheet of such metal in a cold state between two heavier sheets of metal having dissimilar characteristics and in a heated state and then in reducing the gage of the three-ply pack.

11. The method of rolling sheets of steel of 2/1000 of an inch or less in thickness, which consists in producing a sheet no thicker than 14/1000 of an inch, in sandwiching said sheet while cold between two heated sheets of steel having different characteristics and of heavier gage then in rolling the sandwiched sheets to such length as will give the desired thickness to the inner sheet.

12. The method of hot rolling a sheet of metal of less than 6/ 1000 of an inch in thickness, which consists in producing a relatively thin sheet, placing said sheet between two materially heavier sheets of metal having dissimilar characteristics and then in reducing the gage of the multiple pack by hot rolling, substantially as described. 13. The method of hot rolling a sheet of steel to 3/1000 of an inch or less in thickness, which consists in producing a relatively thin sheet, placing said sheet between two metal sheets of materially heavier gage and different characteristics raised to rolling temperature and then in hot rolling the multiple pack, substantially as described.

14. A hot rolled sheet of silicon steel under 6/1000 of an inch in thickness.

15. A hot rolled sheet of silicon steel 3/ 1000 of an inch or less in thickness.

16. A hot rolled sheet of steel less than 6/1000 of an inch in thickness.

17. A hot rolled sheet of steel 3/1000 of an inch or less in thickness.

18. A rolled sheet of silicon steel 2/1000 of an inch or less in thickness.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name this 5th day of June, 1919.

VERE B. BROVVNE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2985945 *Feb 12, 1954May 30, 1961Crucible Steel Co AmericaPack rolling
US3066384 *Jun 18, 1958Dec 4, 1962United States Steel CorpMethod of making wide flat sheets
US3068564 *Feb 17, 1960Dec 18, 1962Universal Cyclops Steel CorpMethod of producing laminated metal strip
US3152383 *Jun 29, 1960Oct 13, 1964United States Steel CorpProduction of flat metal sheets
US3305323 *Jul 13, 1965Feb 21, 1967Nat Steel CorpSteel foil
US4735669 *Sep 2, 1986Apr 5, 1988Reynolds Metals CompanyCold rolling adhesively bonded laminate of plastic and metal f foil
US6202462May 26, 1998Mar 20, 2001Material Sciences CorporationMethod of forming noise-damping material with ultra-thin viscoelastic layer
US8137819 *Jul 26, 2007Mar 20, 2012The University Of TokyoMultilayer steel and method for producing multilayer steel
Classifications
U.S. Classification428/606, 29/17.3
International ClassificationB21B1/40, B21B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21B1/40
European ClassificationB21B1/40