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Publication numberUS1342138 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 1, 1920
Filing dateJul 30, 1919
Priority dateJul 30, 1919
Publication numberUS 1342138 A, US 1342138A, US-A-1342138, US1342138 A, US1342138A
InventorsMaximillian F Stupar
Original AssigneeAbraham J Elias
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Landing-gear for flying-machines
US 1342138 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M. F'. STUPAR. LANDING GEA'R FOR FLYING MACHINES.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 30, I919- v v Patented June 1, 1920.

7 m awa.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

MAXIMILLIAN F. STUPAR, F BUFFALO, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR T0 ABRAHAM J. ELIAS,

OF BUFFALO, NEW YORK.

LANDING-GEAR FOR FLYING-MACHINES.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented J nne 1, 1920.

Application filed July 30, 1919. Serial No. 314,294.

To all whom it may concern.-

Be it known that I, MAXIMILLIAN F. STU- PAR, a citizen of the United States, residing cushion the shocks incident to making landings. The possible variation in the position of the wheel axle or shaft forwardly or rearwardly with reference to the center of weight of the machine is comparatively limited. If the wheels are too far rearward they are apt to cause the machine tonose over or tip forwardly in making a landing,

especially when landing on soft or uneven ground. On the other hand, if the wheels are set too far forwardly, the lifting effect of the landing gear springs on the rear end or tail of the machine is so reduced as to magnify the drag of the tail on the ground and greatly increase the difiiculty of rising from the ground. In any case it is a serious problem to provide, in a single axle construction, a sufficient number of springs or elastic. bands to give the requisite spring support for a large, heavy machine without unduly complicating the construction and increasing the wind resistance.

The object of this invention is to produce a practical and efficient landing gear for flying machines which will overcome the above noted objections and provide an adequate and desirable resilient support for large, heavy machines.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary side elevation of alanding gear embodying the invention.

Fig. 2 is a plan view thereof.

Fig. 3 is a transverse. section thereof on line 3-3, Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a perspective view, on a reduced scale, showing the arrangement of two-like landing gears on a machine.

A represents the landing gear frame, or

depending portion of the main frame of a flying machine on which the ground wheels are mounted. This frame ma be of any suitable construction, having t e necessary strength, rigidity and lightness. The frame shown has a substantially vertical front post or member 10, a brace 11 which inclines upwardly and rearwardly'from the lower portion of the front post 10, and a lower end portion which is preferably extended fore and aft of the machine so as to form a relatively long, narrow base 12 for the connec-' tion of the ground wheels 13. The post and brace are of the usual stream-line form in cross-section. There are preferably four ground wheels arranged in two pairs at the front and rear ends of a suitable wheel support or carriage. The wheel carriage shown is composed of two parallel side bars 14 which extend lengthwise at opposite sides of the base 12 of the landing gear frame and are connected at their front and rear ends by transverse shafts or axles 15 on the ends of which the ground wheels are suitably mounted or journaled. The wheel carriage is resiliently connected to the base of the landing gear frame by elastic bands 01 springs which permit the wheel carriage to yield upwardly relative to the landing gear frame, or the latter to yield downwardly relatively to the wheel carriage. Preferably a series of cross rods 17 connecting the side bars, 14 of the wheel carriage extend transversely through vertically elongated slots 18 in the base of the landing gear frame, and elastic or spring bands or loops 19 attached to'the projecting ends of the cross rods 1'7 pass under and engage the lower edge of the base 12 of the landing gear frame. A group of these bands are usually connected to each cross rod. Hooks or heads are preferably provided on the projectingends of the cross rods 17 to pre vent the disengagement of the bands from the rods, and the lower edge of the-landing gear frame is preferably provided with cross ribs or. projections which confine the elastic bands and prevent them from shifting on or disengagement from the base of the landing gear frame.

When the wheels rest on the groundfithe anding gear frame and the weight of the machine carried thereby are thus suspended from the wheel carriage by a plurality of elastic bands. or loops which are located at intervals along the length of the carriage and yieldingly support the machine from the carriage and permit it to yield downwardly under the weight relatlvely to the wheel carriage. The wheels located at the opposite ends of the relatively long wheel carriage are spaced a considerable distance apart lengthwise of the machine or in the direction of flight, and the front and rear Wheels can be thus disposed respectively in front of and in rear of the center of weight of the machine. The wheel carriage can move bodily up and down relatively to the landing gear frame while maintaining a substantially horizontal position, so thatwhen the center of weight of the machine is substantially over the center of the carriage the front and rear wheels have substantially equal supporting effect. In addition, however, the described resilient connections between the wheel carriage and the landing gear frame permit either the front or rear end of the wheel carriage to yield relatively to the landing gear frame to a greater extent than the opposite end. Therefore, when the machine is making a landing, if the front wheels first strike the ground they can yield upwardly and cushion the shock more or less until the rear wheels strike the ground and cooperate with the front wheels in carrying the machine, the carriage being permitted to yield bodily horizontally while remaining horizontal or to tip up at its front or rear end to equalize the weight on the front and rear wheels and balance the machine. The front wheels can be located far enough forward to practically eliminate the possibility of the machine nosing over and thus being damaged or injuring the occupants in making landings. On the other hand, if the machine, in landing, is at such an inclination that the rear wheels first strike the ground, these can yield and cushion the shock more or less and hold the tail of the machine oil the ground until the ma chine settles on all of the wheels. In rising from the ground the rear wheels, being located in rear of the center of weight of the machine, have a much greater effect in lifting. and holding the tail of the machine off of the ground than wheels located farther forward in the more usual arrangement, and the machine can therefore rise more readily. By the described construction also, the resilient supports for the machine are distributed over a considerable scribed and having'the wheels appropriately riage is distance length- WISE of the c y eethatyan adequate spaced to give the requisite lateral stability to the machine, or in the case of very large machines two such carriages can be used at opposite sides of the center of the machine, as indicated in Fig. 4.

I claim as my invention:

1. A landing gear for flying machines, comprising a frame having a narrow base portion extending lengthwise of the machine, a wheel support extending lengthwise of said frame, ground wheels at the front and rear portions of said wheel support, cross rods extending from said wheel support through elongated slots in said frame, and elastic bands passing under said frame base and attached to said cross rods.

2. A landing gear for flying machines, comprising aframe having a relatively long narrow base extending lengthwise of the machine, a vertically movable wheel carriage comprising connected side bars extending lengthwise at opposite sides of and close to said frame base whereby said carguided in its movements by said frame base, ground wheels mounted on the front and rear portions of said carriage, and resilient connections between said car riage and frame base disposed at a plurality of points lengthwise of said carriage and permitting the carriage to yield relatively to said frame base.

3. Ailanding gear forflying machines, comprising a frame having a relatively long narrow base extending lengthwise of the machine, a vertically movable wheel carriage comprising connected side bars extending'lengthwise at opposite sides of and close to said frame base between the upper and lower extremities thereof, ground wheels mounted on the .front and rear portions of said carriage, and springs yieldingly supporting said base from said carriage at a plurality of points lengthwise of said carriage.

4. A landing gear for flying machines, comprising a frame having a relatively long narrow base extending lengthwise of the machine, a vertically movable wheel carriage comprising side bars extending length-' MAXIMILLIAN F. STUPAR.

Witnesses W. 'ROHRBACHER, L. WERNER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2487548 *Apr 11, 1947Nov 8, 1949Lockheed Aircraft CorpMain landing gear
US2561448 *Aug 12, 1946Jul 24, 1951Murray Alan ESkate for roller skating
US2581809 *Mar 5, 1947Jan 8, 1952Alan E MurrayRoller skating suspension skates
US6390537 *Jun 1, 2000May 21, 2002Digonis Michael K.Vehicle adapted for taxicab and livery cab purposes
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/104.00R, 280/11.28
International ClassificationB64C25/00
Cooperative ClassificationB64C25/64, B64F2700/6226, B64C25/34
European ClassificationB64C25/34, B64C25/64