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Publication numberUS1348138 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 27, 1920
Filing dateJun 12, 1919
Priority dateJun 12, 1919
Publication numberUS 1348138 A, US 1348138A, US-A-1348138, US1348138 A, US1348138A
InventorsJohn Hunt
Original AssigneeJohn Hunt
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Climbing-elevator device
US 1348138 A
Images(10)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. HUNT.

CLIMBING ELEVATOR DEVICE. A PPucAnoN FILED JUNE 12, 1919.

Patented July 27, 1920.

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CLIMBING ELEVATOR DEVICE.

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CLIMBING ELEVATOR DEVICE.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE L2, 1919.

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CLIMBING ELEVATOR DEVICE.

APPLICATION FILED J UNE I21 I9I9.

1,348, 1 38. Pate ted uly 27, 1920.

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CLIMBING ELEVATOR DEVICE;

APPLICATION FILED JUNE 12, 1919.

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CLIMBING ELEVATOR DEVICE.

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CLIMBING ELEVATOR DEVICE.

APPLICATION FILED JUNE 12. 1919.

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CLIMBING ELEVATOR DEVICE.

APPLICATION FILED IUNEIZ, 1.919.

1,348,13 Patented July 27,1920.

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J. HUNT.

CLIMBING ELEVATOR DEVICE. APPLICATION FILED JUNE 12. 1919.

0 2m mm mm J E 7 u a dm a J H m a W m 4 i S W I m H i JOHN HUNT, 0F D'UMONT, COLORADO.

CLIMBING-ELEVATOR DEVICE.

Specification of Lett ers Patent. Patented J ily 7 1920.

Application filed June 12, 1919. Serial No. 803,595.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that 1, JOHN HUNT, a citizen of theUnited States, residing at Dumont, in the county of Clear Creek" and State of Colorado, have invented 'certain new and useful Improvements in Climbin Elevator Devices; and I do declare'the fodlowing to be a full, clear, and exact description of the invention, such as will enable others skilled in the art to which it appertains to make and use the same.

My invention relates to improvements in elevators and more particularly to a machine of this class adapted to climb a track at the side of a building.

One object of the inventlon is to provide an elevator which may be propelled both.

vertically and horizontally along the side of a building, thus well adapting'it for use as a fire-escape and for fire fighting.

Another object is to provide an elevator which may be drawn along the ground, for instance by fire apparatus, and which may be quickly engaged with a vertical track on a building, to scale the side thereof. Thus, by equipping all buildings with the vertical tracks and providing the fire companies with the improved elevators, the occupants of any building may be quickly and easily carried to safety-in case of fire, and the fire may be advantageously fought by using the elevator to carry fire hose or other equipment, in addition to carrying the firemen to the 'mostadvantageous points.

Another object is to provide an elevator of the class described which may well be used in the construction of buildings, for elevating building material and carrying it tothe particular part of the building at which it is to be used.

Other objects are to provide an elevated horizontal'track and a carriage thereon for supporting the vertical track; to make novel provision for propelling the machine along said vertical track; to provide a novel'arrangement of drums andcables operated from the elevator for propelling the carriage along the track; to devise novel brake means for controlling the descent of the elevator; to provide eflicient means for locking the elevator car against descent when it is moving horizontally; and to provide wheels for, guiding the car either when traveling along the ground or along the side of a building. lVith the foregoing in view, the invention resides in the novel constructions and arrangements of parts hereinafter described and claimed, and shown in the accompanying drawings.

Figure 1 is a front elevation of my invention.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation showing the elevator climbing vertically along the side of a building,

F g. 3 is a side elevation with one side ofthe elevator carremoved to illustrate the interior parts thereof. 1' Q Fig. 4 is a front elevation with the casmg of the car in section as indicated by line 44 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a horizontal section on a proximately the plane ofline 5--5 of ig. 3, illustrating the main driven shaft and the means cooperating therewith for propelling the machine vertically and horizontally.

Fig. 6 is a horizontal section cut centrally through the parts shown in elevation in Fig. 5 and further illustrating one of the brakes in section.

Fig. 7 is a vertical sectionon the plane of line 7-7 of Fig. 5, showing more particularly the gear shifting means and one of the brakes. Fig. 8 is a vertical section on the planeof line 88 of Fig. 6, showingthe wheel for propelling the elevator car vertically and the means for holdingsaid wheel in engagement with the vertical track.

Fig. 9 is a side elevation partly in section of the chain ofwhichthe vertical track is preferably constructed.

Fig. 10 is primarily a vertical section on the line 10-10 of Fig. 9, parts however bein shown in edge View.

Figs. 11 and 12 are vertical sections on the planes indicated by the lines 1111 and 12-12 respectively of Fig. 5.

Fig. 13 is a detail section as indicated by line 13 -43 of Fig. 11. h Fig. 14 is a horizontal section on substantially the plane of line 1414 of Figs. 3 and 15 showing more particularly the pedal mechanismand the brake therefor.

Fig. 15 is a vertical section on the plane of line 1515 of F ig'. 1 1.

Fig. 16 is a verticalsection as indicated byline '1616 of Fig. 14.

Fig. 17 is a vertical'section on the plane of line 17-17 of Figs. 14 and 16.

Fig. 18 is a detail vertical section showing a different position of the steering 1eof Fig. 16.

Fig. 19 is an enlarged elevation partly in sectlon, showing the means on theend of the steering lever for connecting it with the steering chain.

"Fig. 20 is a detail elevation partly in section illustrating one manner of mounting the steering lever. v

r Fig. 21 is a small side elevationillustrating the manner in which the elevatorv car may be operated from a-.-hoisting engine on the ground, instead of by self-contained driving means. V

Fig. 22 is an enlarged vertical section on the plane ofline22-22 of Fig. 21.

Fig.23 is a side elevation showing the manner in which the car maytravel along the ground. 1

. In carrying out my invention, Iv provide a vertical track 1, and mount an elevator car 2 on said track for moving along thesame,

' said track beingby preference supported by a carriage 3 which is mounted on a horizontal elevated track 4. This track may be supported in any'preferred manner but I have shown brackets 5 carrying the same and extending from the side of a building -6.

' Carried bythe car 2 are a foot pedal mechanism or other suitable driving means, and gearing and the like for propelling said car along. the track 1 and for propelling the car: riage 3 along the horizontal'track 4t; and I also equip said car with suitable brake and locking means for, controlling or preventing' its descent, and with wheels which may,

be turned to different positions for guiding the travel of the car. This car may either be permanently mounted on the track 1 or maybe detachable therefrom and portable from one building to another, to be drawn for instance by fire apparatus, and the afore said wheels areinstrumental in steering the machine when. it is drawn along the ground. The several features of the machine and one manner of. constructing each of them, are illustrated fully in the accompanying drawings and are specifically described below,but it is to be understood that the present disclosure is for illustrative purposes only, and that all construction shown and described may be in numerous otherforms.

The carriage 3 may be of any suitable construction, but I prefer to provide a hooklike hanger bar. 7 having a peripherally grooved propelling wheel 8 traveling on the track 4, the depending endof'saidhanger bar having arms .9 for contact with the outer side of the track to prevent the wheel 8 from possibly canting and jumping the track. Connected with the wheel 8 for rotation therewith, and preferably mounted on the same shaft -with said wheel, aretwo drums 10, and oppositely wound on said drums are a pair of cablesll which depend to the car 2 and are here wound on drums 12 which may be independently rotated or operated in unison. lVhen the car is moving vertically along the track 1, the cables 11 are wound onto or unwound from the drums 12, and the drums 10 are not then rotated. These drums 10 however are operated by winding either of the cablesll on its drum 12 and simultaneouslypaying out the other cable,

and by this means, the carriage 3 may be propelled horizontally along the track 4 to move the entire elevator horizontally. The means for driving the drums 12. and otherwise controlling the movement thereof, will be hereinafter described in detail, but before a clear understanding of such driving means may be had, it will be necessary .to consider the mechanism for propelling the car vertically along the track 1, since the drum driving'means is dependent upon said propelling means. Y

Mounted horizontally in the car 2, is a suitable frame 13 including a plurality of parallel bars 14 having suitableflbearings for all of the shafts mounted on the frame. A main driven shaft 15 is mounted on the frame 18 and is provided with spur gears 16 for mesh with larger gears 17 which are secured on a second shaft 18. Shaft 18 is provided with a propelling wheel 19secured thereon and engaging .the track 1, and in most instances I prefer to embody the wheel 19 in the form of a sprocket, and to form the track 1 of a sprocket chain, a suitable guide wheel 20 being provided to'hold'the chain and sprocket in mesh with each other. By driving the shaft 18 from the shaft 15, by the gearing 16 17 or other preferred means, the wheel 19 is caused to travel along the track-1, thus propellingfthe entiremachine upwardly. may be relied upon to lower thedevice, and to control the speed of the lowering opera tion, I provide the shaft 18' with a suitable brake. 4 I

The brake above mentioned, preference consists of three disks 21 fined on the shaft 18, and brake levers 22 disposed between the along 'saidtrack Gravity central disk and the others, the shape and otherends may well be guided by contact with ahorizontal shaft 24 which may carry the wheel 20 as shown in Fig.6. I intend to cantthe levers 22 into contact with the disks 21 and thus frictionally controlflthe rotation of theshaft 18, and although. this could be done in a number of ways,I by

preference employfarockshaft25 having a head or the like 26 between theftw'osets of levers, whereby turning of. said shaft will operate said head to cant the levers in-the required manner. 7 A suitable casing 27 may be provided to contain the brake mechanism, and to mount the shaft 25, and obare most clearly illustrated in Figs. 5, 6.

and 8.v

Mounted on the frame 13 in parallelrelation .with the shafts 15 "and-18, are two short shafts .34 which are disposed in alinement with each other, said shafts fixedly carrying gears for mesh with the gears 16 when the latter are moved out of mesh wvith the gears 17. shifting the entire shaft 15 laterally within This may bedone by slots 36 in the bars 14, and although any suitable means may be used for so shifting the shaft 15, I prefer to mount a pair of links 37 onsaid shaft and to slidably sup port said linksat one end on the shafts 34,

asindicated at '38. Above links 37, Iprovide a rock shaft 39- (seev Figs. 5, 7, 8 and 11), said shaft having depending arms 40 suitably connected with the links 37 for shifting the latter when said shaft is turned, and: for turning the shaft in question, I may provide a hand lever 41. To lock this lever in position to hold the-gears 16 in mesh either with the gears 17 or. 35, suitable means such as a slot 42 in the lever, and a clamping bolt 43' passing through said slot, may

well be provided.

Slidable onthe shafts 34, are two sprocket wheels 44, said wheels being movable to one position at which they are locked to the shaft, and being shiftableto another position at which they are free of connection with-said shaft, and suitable means such as the levers. 45 may be used'forshifting the sprocket wheels to either position. Any adequate means maybe employed to lock the levers 45, but I prefer-to provide shouldered links 46 passing through slots 47 in said levers as illustrated most clearly in Figs. 11 and 13. Sprocket chains 48 are trained around the sprockets 44 and around other sprockets securedto the drums 12,.and it will thus be seen that by operating the proper lever 45, one chain or the other may be driven to in turn drive the" required drum '12, thus moving the carriage 3 along the track 4. When this operation takes place, the car is usuallylockedagainst descent by any preferred means.

"use is necessary.

' liable than others.

Forthe purpose of winding the cables 11 during the ascent of the car and for unwinding them as said car descends, and for allowing the drums 12 to be driven by the chains 48 when the car is held against vertical movement, I provide novel means for driving the drums in question from the shaft 18, this means being shown inthe form of. pulleys 50 and 51 mounted respectively on the shaft .18 andthe drums 12, and belts. 52 trained around saidpulleys,.these belts being preferably equipped with suitable tighteners 53. Bythis arrangement, as long as the shaft 18 rotates and drives the propelling wheel 19 to move the carriage along the track. 1, the pulleys50, belts 52 and pulleys 51, drive the drums 12 to either wind or pay out the cables 11, according to the direction in which the car is moving. WVhen the car is to be held against vertical. movement and propelledhorizontally, one or the other of thechains 48 is thrown into play by its respective lever 45, thus positively drivin one drum or the otherto operate the means 11-10 toshift the carriage 3. Durpositively driven by its chain 48, the pulley .51 of said drum will slide upon the belt 52,

and at the same time-a corresponding sliding will take place with respect to the other drum, which must rotate to allow its respective cable to unwind, and this last named action will insure that the cable will be taut at all times in readiness for action when its Any suitable meansoould be provided for driving the shaft 15, but I prefer to equip said shaft with a large sprocket 54,,to train a sprocket chain 55 aroundsaid sprocket, and to drive said chain from a small sprocket 56 on a main driving shaft 57,

said shaft being provided with cranks .58 having foot pedals 59 as illustrated for in stance in Figs. 3, 14,15 and 16. It is intended that a suitable'number ofpersons shall operate the pedals-59to drive shaft 15 and that from this-shaft, either of the means for moving the carvertically and horizontally, shall be 1 driven; I wish it understood that in some instances, I may provide means other than the foot pedals for operating the machine, but 'I prefer them since this form of power is more re- To hold the entire car against possible dropping at any point to which it is raised, I provide a dog 60- coacting-with the chain v5.5, and this dog is by preference arched, as

standard 61 rising from the bottom of the ielevaton car and carrying means for releas-,

ing said dog when required. I have shown this means in the form of a rock shaft 62 mounted onthe standard 61, a crank arm 63 extending from said rock shaft and suitably connected .with the dog, and a hand lever 64'for operating said rock shaft. Suitable means65 may be used if desired to hold the lever 64in one position or the other. In most instances, I will equip the shaft 57 with a brake mechanism 66 f any adequate form, and since the construction 'ofthemechanism shown is practically identical with the brake means of the shaft 18,it will not be further described. In addition'to. the several brakes, I prefer to provide a pin 67 carried by the car' 2 for lever 70 and. a verticallever 71 may beem- 'ployed for operating the bar 68. V

The wheels 72 of the car are carried by shafts 73 suitably mounted in brackets or the like 74 and provided with sprockets 75. A steering chain 76 is trainedaround the several. sprockets 75 and by means of a hand lever or the like 77, said chain may be shifted to simultaneously position the wheels either, vertically or horizontally, for traveling in either direction along the side of a building, and manipulation of said lever will also steer the machine when it is being drawn or propelled along the ground. Lever 77 and its mounting and locking means are illustrated most fully in Figs. 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20. The lever in question passes through an opening ;7 8 in the side of the elevator car and is moun'ted on a bar .79 which spans said opening as indicated in. Fig. 20. The bar 79 may be pro vided with a notch 80 and with a finger 81' projecting into said notch and the lever 77 may well be fulcrumed on this finger and .held against removal therefrom by a slide 82 which may be held by a set screw or the like 83. The free end of the lever 77 is preferablyprovided with a projecting finger 84 for projection through the chain 76, and a hooklike bifurcated slide 85 is provided with an eye 86receiving the outer end of said finger, said slide being adjustably clamped to the lever by suitable means 87 In assembling, the finger 8.4, the slide 85 allows any necessary adjustment according to the distance which the .chain 76 may be spaced from the side ofithe car 2.

For illustrative purposes, I have shown a slide 88 mounted on the bar 79 and havinga vertical part 89 for'holding lever opposed links, should break. These the required 77 in either one position or the other as illustrated in Figs. 16 and 18.

'The car 2 may of course beof any adequate construction and may be provided at one side with a doorway 90 partly closed by a downwardly swinging door 91. This door may be swung downward to open position and will at the same time'bridge the gap between the building and the car, to allow persons to enter and leave the device. 1X sliding door 92 may be provided at the opposite side of the car to permit the occupants to leave when they have been.

carried to the ground. A suitable seat 93 may be provided if desired.

he chain 1 is preferably constructed as seen in Figs. 9 and 10, of parallel opposed links 1* having slots 1 in their ends, the inner ends ofjsaid slots being enlarged, and other links 1 having headed studs 1 received in said slots. The heads of the studs 1. prevent separation of the links until moved to the enlarged inner ends of the slots and this arrangement therefore prevents separation of the chain links in case any of the tie bolts 1 which'connect the tie bolts may well carry rollers 1 and certain of them may pass through the studs 1 Assuming that the car 2 is permanently -mounted on the track 1, the operation .of

the machine is as follows'zTo travel upwardly, the shaft-15 is driven by the pedal mechanism orothermeansprovided therefor,

and the lever 41 is operatedto shift the shaft '15 so as to mesh the gears 16 and 17. This drives shaft 18 and causes the sprocket 19 to climb along the chain ortrackl. During this operation, the pulleys 50-dr'ive the belts 52-to rotate the drums 12 in a direction to wind the cables 11, thus preventing enta-nglement thereof, and any. necessary variations inspeed between the drums andthe shaft 18 are allowed by slippage of the belts; lVhen the car has been elevated to. extent, it will beheld against dropping by the dog 60 but as an additional precaution, the pin 67 may be projected through the chain 1. If the car is now to be shifted laterally, the lever 41 is actuated to mesh the gears 16 and35, thus throwing the vertical propelling means out ofplay andfdisposing the horizontal propelling means for use. The lever 77 is now operated to turn thewheels72 to horizontalpositions andone or theother 'of the sprockets 44 is shifted into locking engagement with its respective shaft 34, while the other sprocket 44 remains loose upon the shaft. When the shaft 15 is-now driven, the gearings 16 and 35 drives the shaft 34 and the sprocket 44 locked thereto, thus operating one of. the

' chains 48 to drive one of the drums 12. The

cable 11 of this drum is thus wound, with {the result thatthe drums 10. are *turned in one direction, thus rotating the propelling wheel 8 and causing the carriage 3 to move in one direction along the track 4. The other cable 11 is in the meantime being wound upon its respective drum 10 and unwound from the drum 12 on which it is attached, the necessary turning of this drum being allowed by slippage of its respectivebelt 52. l/Vhen the carriage 3 is to be shifted in the opposite a direction, the other chain 48 is thrown into play while the one previously in use remains idle by properly shifting its sprocket 4:4. f 1 In order to descend, the dog 60 and the pin 67 are released and themachine then lowers by gravity, its speed being controlled by the brake mechanism of either or both of'the shafts l8 and 57. v I

By elevating the device and moving. it horizontally to the required extent it may be shifted to any window of a building and thus the occupants may be quickly and easily carried to safety in case of fire, and thefire may be fought by carrying firemen, hoses and equipment to the most advantageous. points. i -When the device constitutes a part of aportable fire apparatus, the car 2 is towed or otherwise carried tothe fire and may be quickly engaged with the track 1 and the cables 11, which remain permanently on the carriage 3 with which all'buildings may be equipped.

In addition to the uses above enumerated,

the elevator is of advantage in the erection of buildings and may then be operated as seen'in Figs. 21 and 22. In these figures, all construction is the same as above described, with the exception that the shaft 57 which drives the sprocket chain 55, is provided with a drum 100 on which a cable 101 is wound, said cable passing around a suitable sheave 102 adj acent the ground and being wound on a windlass 103.. This Iwindlass may well "be driven byan ordinary hoisting engineor by a motor vehicle. If desired, a platform 104 may be suspended from the car ,2 for elevating buildin material and carrying it to any require part of the building.

- It will bevunderstood that the different gears employed may be fastened to their shafts in any desired manner but I prefer v to make such gears with squared openings in their centers to fit squared portions of the shafts so that there will be no possibility V iofthe; gears becoming loose. from the shafts device.

, during the operation of the device, as would be the case if the gears were fastened by removable keys. This construction'it will be readily seen will tend to lessen the liability of accident in the operation of the,

From the foregoing, takenfin connection with-the accompanying drawings,. the co'n- :7

ing from said carriage, a carmovable along said" verticaltrack, means carried by said said carriage, a car movable along said vertical track, means carried bysaid carfor propelling it along said vertical track, and means operable from said car for propelling said carriage along said horizontal track;

2. In a machine of the class described, an

elevated horizontaltrack, a'carriage having a propelling wheel movable along said track, drum and cable means for rotating said propelling wheel, a vertical track dependcar for moving it along said vertical track,

"and means carried by said car for operating said drum and cable means to propel said carriage along said horizontal track.

3. In'amachine of theclass described, an elevated horizontal track, a carriage having a a propelling wheelmovable along said track,

drumand cable means'for rotating said propelling wheel, a vertical track depending from said carriage, a car movable along said vertical track, means carried by said car for moving it along said vertical track, and means carried by said car for operating'said drum and cable means to propel said carriage along said horizontal track and for 4; In a machine of the class described,'an elevated horizontal track, a carriage having connected with said propelling wheel for rotating the same, cables wound oppositely on said drum means and depending therefrom, a verticaltrack depending from said Y winding said cable means as said car travels upwardly.

carriage, a car and means for moving it along said track, and drums carried by said our for winding said cables to operate said propelling wheel.

5.. In a machine of the class described, an elevated horizontal track, a carriage having a propelling wheel movable along said track, drum meanscarried by said carriage and connected with said propelling wheel for rotating the same, cables wound oppositely on said drum means and depending therefrom, a vertical track depending from {said carriage, a car and means for moving it along said track, a pair of drums carried drums, the non-positive drive being operated cal track, driving by said car moving means. p

. .6 machine of the class described, an elevated horizontal track and a carriage on saidtrack, a: vertical track depending from said carriage, a car movable along saidovertimeans carried by said car, means for propelling said car. vertically,

means for propelling said carriage hori- I for engaging eitherof zontally, and means said propelling means operatively with said driving means.

7. In a machine of theclass described, an

elevated horizontal track, a carriage on said track, a vertical track depending from said carriage, a car fmovable'along said vertical track, means for propelling said car along said vertical track, means for propelling said carriage along said horizontal track, including a pair of cablesv and a pa r of drums on said carvon which said cables are wound, means for driving said drums fromsaid: car propelling. means 1 and for permitting continued rotation 'of-said drums after arresting the movement, of said propelling means, and additional means for then ositively driving either of said drums.

8. n a machine of the class described, an elevated horizontal track, a carriage having a propelling Wheel on said track,a vertical track depending from said carriage,

a car movable along said vertical track and having a propelling wheelj traveling thereon, driving means carried bysaid car and including a driven. shaft, a second shaft carrying saidpropelling wheel of said car, means for driving said second shaft at will from said driven shaft, means for rotating the propelling wheel of said carriage including a pair ofcables and a. pair of drums on said car on which said cables, are wound, means for, driving said drums from said second shaft and for allowing continued turning of said drumsv after .arresting'the .IIIOVGIIIGIlt of said second shaft, and means forthen driving either of said drums at will from said driven shaft,

9. In a machine of the class described, an

elevated horizontal track, a carriage having a propelling wheel on said track, a ver- 7 tical track depending from said carriage, a car movablealong said having a propelling wheel traveling thereon, driving meanscarried'by said car and including a driven shaft, .a second shaft carryin isaid propelling wheel of said car,- 7 means or .drivingsaid from said driven shaft, means for f 'rotating the propelling wheelof said carr1age, in-' elu i a P ir of ab and ai'r of dr m on said car; on which said cablesare wound,

belts and pulleys for drivingsaid" drums from said second shaft and for permitting "gearing is shifted out'of mesh with the gearing of said second shaft, r an i it against retrograde movement.

' sprocket -mov'ablelalong saidftrack, V

1 j ropellin'gl said arriage vertical track 1 depending from said'carriage a; car movable along said vertical track'- and means "for w'vmo ing A sis per; a plurality Of guide wheels'for said c'ar adaptedj to travel'along wall, and 'Iiieansf fer-taming said wheels horizontally or vertically, according second shaftat will continued rotation of said drums after ar resting movement of saidsecond shaft, and means for then driving either of said drums at will from' said driven shaft. 7 I

10.111 a machine of the class described,

an elevated horizontal track and'a'c'arriage V thereon, a vertical track depending from said carriage, a casing having guiding means through which said vertical I track passes, a horizontal frame in said casing,

adriven' shaft mountedon said 'frame',-a

propelling said "carriage along? said 1hori ncluding a pair of'depend ing cables and a pair of drums mounted n zontal track,

said casing above said frame, pulleys on said second shaft and on said dr'ums'and belts passing around said" pulleys for drivtation thereof when rotation of said second shaft is discontinued, additional gearing mounted onsaid frame for mesh with the gearing of said driven shaft whenthe-latter means for 'operatively connecting them from said additional gearing, other sprockets on said drums, and sprocket chains trained around the two sets of sprockets 11. In a machine ofthe 'class' described,

a vertical track, a-car movable along said track, means in said car for propelling it "along the track, includinga foot operated shaft, anda sprocket chaln driven'thereby,

and a dog coacting with, saidchain tohold 12 111 a machine of the class described, a

vertical track, a car mov'ablealong said 7 track, means in said car' 'for}propellingit along the track, including foot operated shaft, ,a sprocket on said, shaft, and; a

in" said drums and erm-itt in further rochain trained around said sprocket,

an arched standard through the jlegsiof I whichsaid shaft passes, an archedjdog p'ivoted on said shaft between said arch legs and coacting with said" chain to hold thelatter 'against retrograde movement, and means I. mounted on said standard for releasing said vertical track 'and,

andmeans for 13:15 a ans Ores class aesegita,

to the direction in which the car is to be moved.

14k. In a machine of the class described, a horizontal track for disposition adjacent the top of the Wall of a building, a carriage movable along said track and means for propelling said carriage; a vertical track depending from said carriage, a car movable along said vertical track and means for so moving said car; a plurality of guide Wheels for said car adapted to travel along said Wall, a handle movable to two positions, and connecting means between said handle and said wheels for turning the latter simultaneously to either horizontal or vertical position by one movement of said handle.

15'. In a machine of the class described, a horizontal track for disposition adjacent the top of the wall of a building, a carriage movable along said track and means for propelling said carriage; a vertical track depending from said carriage, a car movable along said vertical track and means for so moving said car; a plurality of guide Wheels for said car adapted to travel along said wall, horizontal shafts mounted rotatably on said car and carrying said wheels, sprockets on said shafts, a sprocket chain trained around said sprockets, and means for moving said sprocket chain to position said wheels horizontally or Vertically.

16. In a machine of the. class described, a horizontal track for disposition adjacent the top of the wall of a building, a carriage movable along said track and means for propelling said carriage; a vertical track dependingfrom said carriage, a car movable along said vertical track and means for so moving said car; a plurality of guide wheels for said car adapted to travel alongsaid wall, horizontal shafts mounted rotatably on said car and carrying said wheels, sprockets on said shafts, a sprocket chain trained around said sprockets, and a lever extending through an opening in the side of said car and connected with said chain for operating it to position said wheels either vertically or horizontally.

17. In a machine of the class described, a

horizontal track for disposition adjacent the for said car adapted to travel along said Wall, horizontal shafts mounted rotatably on said car and carrying said wheels, sprockets on said shafts, a sprocket chain trained around said sprockets, a lever connected with said sprocket chain for operating it to turn said wheels either horizontally or vertically, the side of said car having an opening through which said lever extends, a bar spanning said opening and supporting said lever, and a slide movable along said bar for holding said lever in either position.

18. Ina machine of the class described, a horizontal track for disposition adjacent the top of the wall of a building, a carriage movable along said track and means for propelling said carriage; a vertical track depending from said carriage, a car movable along said vertical track and means for so moving said car; a plurality of guide wheels for said car adapted to travel along said wall, horizontal shafts mounted rotatably on'said car and carrying said wheels, sprockets on said shafts, a sprocket chain trained around said sprockets, a lever fulcrumed on the car andhaving a finger extending through said sprocket chain, a hook-like slide mounted on said lever and having an eye receiving said finger and means for securing said slide to said lever.

19. In a machine of the class. described, a

vertical chain, a car having a vertical tubular guide with flared ends and an enlarged intermediate portion, said guide receiving said chain, a propelling sprocket in said enlargement meshing with said chain, means for driving said sprocket, and another wheel in said enlargementfor holding said chain in mesh with said sprocket.

20. A machine of the class described com- I prising a car having Wheels adapted to travel on the ground when moving from place to place, or to travel along the wall of a building, and climbing means carried by said car andadapted totravel along a track at the side of the building.

.In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand.

J OHN' HUNT.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US3570627 *Jan 10, 1969Mar 16, 1971Michelson YigalPower ladder with a tower and a carriage movable thereon
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US7357223 *Nov 28, 2006Apr 15, 2008Spacelift Products, Inc.Platform lift apparatus with integrated ladder for accessing attic storage space
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EP0041628A2 *May 13, 1981Dec 16, 1981Franz WassermannHoisting and rescue apparatus for fašades of high buildings
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Classifications
U.S. Classification182/37, 187/239, 187/407, 187/270, 182/14, 182/141
International ClassificationB66B9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB66B9/00
European ClassificationB66B9/00