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Publication numberUS1348204 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 3, 1920
Filing dateAug 13, 1917
Priority dateAug 13, 1917
Publication numberUS 1348204 A, US 1348204A, US-A-1348204, US1348204 A, US1348204A
InventorsOtis Brewster Guy
Original AssigneeOtis Brewster Guy
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bullet-proof armor
US 1348204 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

e. 0. BREWSTER. BULLET PROOF ARMOR. APPLICATION FIFED AUG-13,19l7.

Patented Aug. 3, 1920.

-3 SHEETS-SHEET l.

6. 0. BREWSTER. 7

BULLET PROOF ARMOR. APPLICATION FILED AUG. 13, 191 7 1 348, 204 Patented Aug. 3, 1920.

3 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

7&6.

Ia elem?! m @m 33mm has Wm e. 0. BREWSTER. BULLET PROOF ARMOR. APPLICATION FILED AUG-13, I917- Patented Aug. 3

1920. 3 SHEETS-SHEET s.

HHHHI HH I A[ UNITED STA TES PATENT OFFICE.

GUY OTIS BREWSTER, OF DOVER, NEW JERSEY.

BULLET-PROOF ARMOR.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Aug. 3, 1920.

Application filed August 13, 1917. Serial No. 186,034.

proof, and which affords free movementof the arms, legs and neck of the wearer. I

- A further object of the invention is to provide an armor of the class described which is light and can be conveniently carried. l

A further object of the invention is to provide an armor of the class described which is provided with shock absorbing pads scientifically located over non-sensitive and non-vital spots or portions of the human frame.

A further object of the invention is to provide a bullet proof armor which may be assembled and dis-assembled readily, there by allowing same to be a part of a soldiers pack or equipment, and easily transported in numbers from place to place, and which can be put on and taken off by an individual without other assistance in a small amount of time.

Further objects of the invention will appear more fully hereinafter.

The invention consists substantially in the construction, combination, location, and relative arrangement of parts, all as Wlll be more fully hereinafter set forth, as shown by the accompanying drawings, and finally pointed out in the appended claims.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1 is a View in front perspective of an armor embodying my invention.

Fig. 2 is a sectional View taken on the line 2, 2, Fig. 1, and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on the line 3, 3, Fig. 1, and looking in the direction of the arrows. I v

Fig. 4: is a View; similar to Fig. 3 showing the armor supporting means employed.

I Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 2 showing a modified construction of leg and foot armor.

Fig. 6 is a View inrfront elevation of a modified construction of body and head armor.

Fig. 7 is a rear view of the body and head armor.

Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken on the line 8, 8, Fig. 7, and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Fig. 9 is a perspective View of the helmet support.

Fig. 10 is a broken detail view.

The same part is designated by the same reference numeral wherever it occurs throughout the several views.

In my co-pending application, No. 69,009, I show and describe a bullet proof armor made of angular metal adapted to be worn by a soldier to afford protection to the front of his body from toe to crown. My present invention is directed to armor of this type, namely, angle metal made angularly to afford the deflecting surface for the impact of bullets; the armor itself being of bullet proof steel, or armor steel.

In my present invention I provide a frame made of wire or other suitable similar material which is readily slipped on by the soldier and to which is secured the cushions or padsor other shock absorbing elements, which elements are located on the wire frame at scientifically located spots which will, when the frame is adjusted to the form of the user, fall over non-sensitive and non-vital portions of the bodyof the .wearer. I provide means for readily securing the armor plate, which is formed in two parts, to this wire frame. I also provide attaching means for securing the frame to the body so that the weight of the armor suspended from the frame is evenly distributed over the body and the total weight thereof falls on what is known in the medical profession as the acromion process of scapula and clavicle, at which portions of the anatomy there is no nerve, and is used particularly in climates and countries where heavy burdens are carried by men to support heavy loads without pain, injury, or discomfort.

Referring to the drawing, I indicate at 1 the wire frame above referred to. This wire frame is provided with a curved portion adapted to pass over the shoulders of the wearer. The curved portion 2 isprovided with a pad which fits snugly across the acromion process of scapula and clavicle.

and held in place around the body of the user in any desirable manner, for example, by straps 8, the armor is then secured to the frame as will be hereinafter described. The armor as above outlined consists of metal sheets placed at an angle relative to each other, the sheets providing means for protecting various exposed portions of the user as will be'hereinafter set forth. The head or helmet portions may be of one piece with the body armor or may be separate and independent therefrom. IVhere the helmet is of one piece with the body armor a head support shown in Figs. 4, S, and 9, is employed, which head support is also carried by frame 1. This head support consists of straps shown in detail in Fig. 9 provided with the pads 10 and chin rest 11, also padded, and cross pads 12 and'13 as shown for assisting and supporting thehelmet and body portion of the armor. Each sheet of armor is secured to the frame in any suitable manner, for example, by bolt and nut, at any number of desired places. In practice I find that it is sufiicient to bolt each portion of the armor 20, 21, to the frame 1 at two places, namely, nearthe chestor sternum pad, and near the pelvic pad. vWhen the helmet is made in one piece integral with the body portion of the armor I provide suitable means for allowing sight from within the armor. This may be of any desired form. For example, the holes 25 as shown in Fig. 1, of, it may be the F rench racing slots 26 as shown in Fig. 6. The steel or armor plate of the helmet is bent over the top of the user and substantially over the back of his head as indicated. at 29, Figs. 7 and 8, to protect as far as the back of the neck of the wearer. If desired, and as shown, the body portions of thearmor may be provided with a curved shield 30 at each side to cover in front and from the rear the coracoid process of scapula and humerus as will. be apparent from the drawing. If desired a back protector indicated at'35 may be suspended from the free ends of the curved portion 2 of the frame 1 and held in place by strap 36 strapped around the front of the body of the soldier. When this back protector is employed I prefer to associate therewith a pad which would strike a sacrum of the soldier and absorb the shock The frame is also of impact of a projectile thereagainst by that above the top of the trench it isobvious that there are no requirements to protect the pedal extremity of the soldier. Where the armor is used to advance in the face of fire, however, it is obvious that some means must be taken to protect both the legs and feet of the wearer as well as the arms of the wearer. Various forms of leg protector may be employed, but after considerable experimentation I have arrived at two practical forms, one shown in Figs. 1 and 2, wherein the leg'portion 40 is formed with a curved foot portion 41 secured thereto, the leg portion 40 being secured to the armor plates 20 and 21' in any suitable manner, for example,

by bolts 43. The leg armor is curved as indicated to afford a deflecting surface for an impacting bullet. Due to the angle of the plates 20 and 21 of the body protector relative to the front of the wearer the leg portions 40 can swing on theirbolt connection a sufficient distance to allow the wearer of 'the armor to walkin a manner quite similar knee and for this reason I have sucessfully As above explained, a'separate helmet may be employed as shown in Fig. 6, and as described in detail in my 'co-pending appli-' cation, Serial No. 69,009, filed December 28, 1915, in which instance, ofcourse, the helmet supporting frame secured to the frame 1 would be dispensed with. I have found in practice that it is advisable to allow the arms of the wearer of the armor to be free,

and for this reason to' protect the same in advancing in the face offire the arms .can

easily be held in back of the body allowing little or no exposure of any portion of his body, the only possible exposure being the fleshy part of the arm, and then under circumstances whlch would not normally be encountered as will be hereinafter described.

If desired, however, even the arm may be protected as described and set forth in my co-pending application above identified.

When all of the armor has been assembled on the wearer it willbe seen that have provided a protection which is bullet proof to the entire front of the wearer leaving exposed only the back surface of the legs below the sacrum. This is particularly de' sirable in modern warfare in use, for ex ample, by surgeons who in bending forward over the ground to aid a wounded soldier for protection for their vital parts from shrapnel shells and any shells exploding in the air above them. The foregoing as shown in Fig. 1 form the entire equipment of my armor, but it is obvious that any portions of it may be dispensed with as occasion may arise; For example, 111 trench warfare, all

portions except the body and helmet portions may be dispensed with, and for advancing on trenches only the body portion and the leg portions may be employed, but my broad invention consists in providing an armor which is bullet proof and which may be readily assembled and dis-assembled in use and which will effectively receive and absorb the shock of impact of high velocity bullets to thereby prevent the shock of impact from incapacitating the soldier, which is accomplished. as above set forth by ab sorbing the shock of impact at non-sensitive and non-vital parts of the human frame. WVhen the armor is dis-assembled it can be packed compactlyv and forwarded to first line trenches in desired quantities. The men in their trenches can then adjust the frame 1 to their body, strap it in place, and then proceed to secure the armor plates. to the frame as above outlined. Thus it will be seen that I have provided a simple bullet proof armor which does not impede the free use of the legs, arms or neck of theoccupant, and which has been thoroughly tested,

and has proven to be bullet proof and shock proof, and which allows the free movement of the occupant for either defensive or offensive warfare.

The helmet portion, to secure the desired angular effect, I construct ofa plurality of pieces of metal or armor plate secured together in any desirable manner, for exbolts, or the like, and likewise I secure the 'front edge of the two sheetslQO and 21, to-

desired, as is shown in Fig. 10, an arm protector indicated at 110 may be secured to the vdesired the method'of joining the two portions of the body armor may be similar to that shown for joining the portions of the head armor, and vice versa, and I have merely shown the two different forms in connection with the two different portions of the armor to show the two forms. which I have tried and have found to besatisfactory for the purpose.

It is obvious that many changes in detail will occur to those skilled in the art without departing from the. spirit or scope of my invention, as defined in the claims, and therefore what I claim as new and useful and of my own invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is,- v

1. In an armor, the combination-with a rigid frame adapted to be carried by the body, said frame extending from the shoulders to a point below the hips and completely across the body, of an armor, and means for securing said armor to said frame so that the frame is interposed between the ders to a point below the hips and com pletely across the body, of an armor, and means for securing said armor to said frame so that the frame is interposed between the armor and the trunk portion-of the body.

3. In an'armor, the combination with a rigid frame adapted to be carried by the body, said frame extending from the shoulders to a point below the hips and completely across the body, of an: armor formed in two parts, and means for securing said armor to said frame so that the frame isinterposed between the armor and the trunk portion of the body, whereby said armor parts are disposed at an angle to each other,

armor parts and the trunk portion of the body. ample, by means of the strips 100 by rivets,

4:.'In an armor, the combination with a rigid frame adapted to'be carried by the body, of anarmor, and means for detachably securing said armor to said frame.

5. In an armor, the combination with a rigid frame adapted to be carried by the body, said frame extending from the shoulders to a point below the hips and completely acrossthe body, of an armor formed 7 in two parts, and means for detachably securing said armor "to said frame whereby said armor parts are disposed at an angle to each other, said frame being interposed between the armor parts and the trunk portion of the body.

6. A bullet proof armor comprising a rigid frame adapted to be readily put on or taken off, and a head and body protecting bullet proof armor carried by the front of said frame, and a leg protecting bulletproof armor carried by said body protecting armor.

7. A bullet. proof armor comprising a rigid frame adapted to be'readily put on or taken off, and a head and body protecting bullet proof armor carried by the front of said frame, and a back protecting bullet proof armor carried by the rear of said frame.

8. A bullet proof armor comprising a frame adapted to be readily put on or taken off, and a head and body protecting bullet proof armor carried by the front of said frame, and a back protecting bullet proof armor carried by the rear of said frame, and a leg protecting bullet proof armor, carried by said body protecting armor.

9. A bullet proof armor comprising a rigid frame adapted to be readily put on or taken off, said frame extending from the shoulders to a point below the hips and completely across the body, of an armor made in vertical sections, each section adapted to cover an approximate half of the front of the body and the side thereof, the top of the body and a shoulder, and means for securing the armor to said frame, whereby the sections are disposed at an angle relative to I each other, said frame being interposed be tween the armor parts and the trunk portion of the body.

10. A bullet proof armor comprising a frame adapted to be readily put on or taken off, said frame extending from the shoulders to a point below the hips and completely across the body, of an armor made in vertical sections, each section adapted to cover an approximate half of the front of the body, and the side thereof, the top of the body and a shoulder, and means for securing the armor to said frame, whereby the sections are disposed at an angle relative to each other, and means for securing said sections in their angularly disposed positions to each other, said frame being interposed between the armor parts and the trunk portion of the body. I

11. In an armor, the combination with a frame adapted to be carried by the body, of an armor, and means for securing said 1 armor to said frameand pads carried by by said frame and interposedbetween said frame and the body, and so positioned as to absorb and distribute the shock of impact of a projectile against said armor to non-sensitive, non-vital parts of the body.

13. Inan armor, the combination witha frameprovided with a portion to rest over the shoulder, means for securing said frame to the body, bullet proof armor, and means for securing said armor to said frame, and pads carried by said frame and interposed between-said frame and the body, and so positioned as to absorb and distribute the shock of impact ofa projectile against said armor. to non-sensitive, non-vital parts vof the body.

14. In an armor, the combination with a frame adapted to becarried by the body, of an armor formed in two parts, and means for securing said armor to said frame whereby said armor parts are disposed at an angle to each other, and pads carried by said frame'and interposed between said frame and the body, and so positioned as to absorb and distribute the shock of impact of a projectile against said armor to non-sensitive, non-vital parts of the body.

- 15. In an armor, the combination with a frame adapted to-be carried by the body, of an armor, and means for'detachably securing said armor to said frame, and pads carried by said frame and interposed between said frame and the body, and sopositioned as to absorb anddistribute the shock of impact of a projectile against said armor to nonsensitive, non-vital parts of the body.

16. In an armor, the combination with a frame adapted to be carried by the body, of an armor formed in two parts, and means for detachably securing said armor to said frame whereby said armor parts are disposed at an angle to each other, and pads carried by said frame and interposed be tween said frame and the body, and so positioned as to absorb and distribute the shock of impact of a projectile against said armor to non-sensitive, non-vital parts. of the body.

17. A bullet proof armor comprising a 7 frame adapted to be readily puton or taken off, and a head and body protecting bullet proof armor carried by the front of said 0E, and a head and body protecting bullet proof armor carried'by the front of said frame, and a leg protecting bullet proof armor carried by saidbody protecting arjectile against said armor to non-sensitive and non-vital parts of the body.

19. A bullet proof armor comprising a frame adapted to be readily put on or taken off, and a head and body protecting bullet proof armor carried by the front of said frame, and a back protecting bullet proof armor carried by the rear of .said frame,

and pads interposed between the back protecting armor and the body.

20. A bullet proof armor comprising a frame adapted to be readily put on or taken off, of an armor made in vertical sections, each section adapted to cover an approximate half of the front of the body and the side thereof, the top of the body and a shoulder, and means for securing the armor to said frame, whereby the sections are disposed at an angle relative to each other, and

pads carried b said frame and interposed between said rame and the body, and so positioned as to absorb and distribute the shock of impact of a projectile against said armor to non-sensitive, non-vital parts of the body.

21. A bullet proof armor comprising a frame adapted to be readily put on or taken off, of an armor made in vertical sections, each section adapted to cover an approximate half of the front of the body, and the side thereof, the top of the body and a shoulder, and means for securing the armor to said frame, whereby the sections are disposed at an angle relative to each other, and means for securing said sections in their angularly disposed positions to each other, and pads carried by said frame and interposed between said frame and the body, and so positioned as to absorb and distribute the shock of impact of a projectile against said armor to non-sensitive, non-vital parts of the body.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my7hand on this 31st day of July A. 1)., 191

GUY OTIS BREWSTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2432565 *Sep 30, 1944Dec 16, 1947Bristol Steel & Iron Works IncKnee pad
US2484494 *Apr 30, 1947Oct 11, 1949Robert O FergusonKnee pad
US2733443 *Sep 28, 1953Feb 7, 1956 holder
US4417146 *Jul 10, 1981Nov 22, 1983Herbert Linton MX-Ray attenuating apron
US4467476 *Oct 11, 1983Aug 28, 1984Herbert M LintonBullet-proof garment
US4674394 *Oct 16, 1985Jun 23, 1987Pro-Tech Armored Products Of New York, Inc.Portable bullet-proof shield
US7266850Nov 24, 2004Sep 11, 2007Diamondback Tactical, LlpSide armor protection
US7490358Aug 11, 2005Feb 17, 2009Diamondback Tactical L.L.L.P.Back armor
US8146169 *Jun 18, 2007Apr 3, 2012Fabio Massimo MarchesiClothing endowed with bulletproof and knife-proof properties
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/2.5
International ClassificationF41H1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41H1/00
European ClassificationF41H1/00