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Publication numberUS1349103 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 10, 1920
Filing dateMay 2, 1917
Priority dateMay 2, 1917
Publication numberUS 1349103 A, US 1349103A, US-A-1349103, US1349103 A, US1349103A
InventorsHarris Rogers James
Original AssigneeHarris Rogers James
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Radiosignaling system
US 1349103 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

JAMES HARRIS ROGERS, OF HYATTSVILLE, MARYLAND.

RADIOSIGNALING SYSTEM.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Aug. 10, 1920.

Application filed May 2. 1917. Serial No. 165.875.

To all m/wm if may coa -cm;

lie it known that l. Jun-2s Iluuus Roo- Jnzs, a citizen of the lnitcd States. residing at H iattsvill e'. in the county of Prince Georges and State of Maryland. have invented new and useful Improvements in lladiosignaling Systems. of which the following'is a specification.

My invention -relates to radio signaling or the sending and receiving of signals through space by means of electromagnetic waves; and it pertains particularly to the disposition of the radio conductor or cond uctors.

In the course of my experiments I have discovered that grounded radio conductors or antennae are highly efficient when disposed horizontally or substantially parallel to the surface of the earth. and 51 :inded by or inclosed in a uniform mctaiuc screen practically throughout their length. but insulated therefrom. The advantages of long prostrate (as distinguished from erect) antennae are thus obtained and the objectionable effects of certain forms of static conbeing shown associated with the antemuc:

Fig. 1 shows-I. conventional arrangement of sending instruments which may be substituted for the receiving instruments for transmitting signals:

Fig. '2 is a view similar to Fig. 1. but showing the inclosing screen for the antennae elevated above the surface of the earth. the instruments. receiving or transmitting. being merely indicated by one of the coupling coils:

Fig. 3 isasimilar view showing the inclosing screen buried beneath the surface of the earth;

Fig. 4 shows diagrammatically a modification; and

Fig. a similar view showing the invention applied to a boat or vessel. such as a submarine. I

Referring to the drawings. 10 indicates the signal instruments, which in Fig, l are fronts when receiving.

those for receiving signals. while in Fig. 1 the instruments for sending signals are shown. In Fig. 1, 11 is a detector of any type, preferably an audion, 12 a telephone, and 13 and 14 the usual condensers. Any desired type of instruments and arrangement of connecting circuits may be employed.

In Fig. 1 suitable sending instruments are conventionally shown. These comprise 'a geneiu-itor 15. transformer- 16. spark ga '17. condenser 18 and key 19.

The above mentioned instruments are well known in the art of radio or magnetic wave signaling. and need not be further described.

20 and 21 are two antennae extending in different directions from the signal instruments. and are shown associated with these instruments by indirect coupling. as coils 22 and 23 of a transformer. These antennae may extend in opposite directions. and in order to attain maximum efliciency arrangement may be made so that they may be disposed in a line at right angles to the wave Such an arrange ment is fully described in a ppli 'ation S. No. 130.603. which has since issued as Patent No. 1.322.622. dated Nov. 25; 1919.

T ie antennae are each inclosed in a metallic screen shown as a metal pipe 24 in which the antenna is mounted by spacers or disks 25 of insulating material. such as porcelain. clay. fiber or the equivalent. so that while each antenna is inclosed substantially throughout its length by the metallic screen it is insulated therefrom. At the outer end. or end away from the instruments, each antenna 20 and 21 is connected to earth plates 26 and 27 respectively.

The length of each antenna may be selected to' suit the conditions under which each system is to work. and may be several hundred or a thousand feet. or more. The pipe or screen may be of iron or other metal suitable to accomplish the purpose. and serves to protect the antenna from certain static conditions which would or might interfero with the sending or receiving of signals.

The surface of the earth is indicated at 28. and in Fig. 1 the antennae and their inclosing screens are shown resting upon and in .contact with the surface of the earth substantially throughout their length.

In Fig. 2 the antennae and their incl ng screens are shown supported above the sur face of the earth. and may or may not be insulated therefrom. in this ligurc. as also in Figs. 3.1 and 5. the sending and receiving instrun'icnls. whichi'wcr is connected for use at any given time. is merely indicated by one coil .23 of the coupling.

In Fig. 3 the antennae and their inclosing screens are shown buried beneath the sur face of the earth. in which case the instru ments may be in a covered chamber 29 below ground.

In Fig. 4 is shown an arrangement in which, instead of asso iating one set of signal instruments with both antenna). two sets of instruments are provided, one set 23' being connected to antenna All and screen or pipe 24". and instruments 23 being con nected to antenna 21 and screenorpipc 24". In this way two sets of instruments may be used simiiltancously. both sets for sending or receiving or one set for sending and the other set for receiving.

In using the term' surface of the earth I intend to designate the surface where there is water as well as where there is land. The

invention is therefore equally applicable to or hull, so that each antenna is inclosed sub-- stantiall throughout its length within the vessel. Ihe ground plate 26' at the forward end of the vessel is preferablypivotally mounted at its forward edge on brackets 31. 32 so as to swing freely with the movements of the vessel, but is insulated therefrom as shown diagrammati'cally at 3,3, 33. The antenna 20 is connected to plate 26' in any suitable manner. Ground plate 27'- is similarly mounted on brackets 31. 32. at the stern of the vessel, and is connected to antenna 21. These plates may be mounted in any other suitable manner.

In all of the embodiments of the invention the pipe or screen is preferably filled with oil such as is ordinarily used in translormers. for the purpose of preventing hrnsh disharge. this being indicated at 5.

In accordance with the. patent statutes l have described what I now bclicvc to he the best embodiment of the invention. hot I do not wish to he understood thereby as limit ing myscll' or the scope of the invention. as many changes and modifications may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention and all such I aim to include in the scope of the appended claims. For instance. each antenna is shown as a single wire or conductor. Whereas it might be composed of multiple conductors.

\Vhat I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States. is

1. A radio signaling system comprising an antenna extending horizontally substantially parallel to the surface of the earth. signal instruments associated with said antenna at one end and a ground connection at the other end. and a metallic screen in intimate contact with the earth substantially throughout its length and inclosing said antenna.

2. A radio signaling system comprising an antenna extending horizontally substantially parallel to the surface of the earth. signal instruments associated with said antenna at one end and a ground connection at the other end, and a metallic screen upon and in contact with the earth and inclosing aid antenna substantially throughout its length but insulated therefrom.

3. A radio signaling system comprising an antenna extending horizontally substantially parallel to the surface of the earth. signal instruments associated with said antenna at one end and a ground connection at the other end. and a metallic screen buried beneath the surface of the earth and inclosing said antenna substantially throughout its length but insulated therefrom.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand in presence of two subscribing Witnesses.

JAMES HARRIS ROGERS.

Vitnesses ALEX J. HASSON, \VAL'roN C. CARROLL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2585907 *Jun 26, 1947Feb 19, 1952Engineering Res CorpTransmitting and receiving apparatus for electromagnetic prospecting
US3867710 *May 2, 1960Feb 18, 1975IttCommunication system
US4809010 *Jun 23, 1982Feb 28, 1989Canon Kabushiki KaishaLow profile wireless communication system and method
US4825224 *Sep 2, 1986Apr 25, 1989Eyring Research Institute, Inc.Broad band impedance matching system and method for low-profile antennas
US4829310 *Jun 23, 1982May 9, 1989Eyring Research Institute, Inc.Wireless communication system using current formed underground vertical plane polarized antennas
WO1989012332A1 *Jun 3, 1988Dec 14, 1989Eyring Research Inst IncBroad band impedance matching system and method for low-profile antennas
WO1989012333A1 *Jun 3, 1988Dec 14, 1989Eyring Research Inst IncGuided wave antenna system and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification343/719, 343/793, 343/845, 343/709, 343/841, 455/272
International ClassificationH01Q1/27, H01Q1/34
Cooperative ClassificationH01Q1/34
European ClassificationH01Q1/34