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Publication numberUS1352943 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 14, 1920
Filing dateFeb 9, 1920
Priority dateFeb 9, 1920
Publication numberUS 1352943 A, US 1352943A, US-A-1352943, US1352943 A, US1352943A
InventorsDodge Charlie B, Lewis Dodge
Original AssigneeDodge Charlie B, Lewis Dodge
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pneumatic foot
US 1352943 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. AND C. B. DODGE.

PNEUMATIC FOOT.

.APPLICATION FILI-:D FEB. 9. 1920.

Patented Sept. 14, 1920.

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UNITED STA-TES PATENT oFF-ICE.

LEWIS DODGE 'ANDOHAEL'I' E. DODGE, or MORSE BLUFF, NEBRASKA;

- PNEUMATIC FOOT;V

f CHARLIE B. DODGE, .citizens of the United a States,fresiding at MorseV Bluff, in the county of Saundersnand State of'ebrasla,

haveinvented certain new and useful Improvements in Pneumatic Feet, of which the followingy is a specification.`

This invention relates to improvements in artiiicialfeet and means for so arranging said articialfeet insideA the boot or' shoe that when in use, it will simulate the action of the human foot, as shown and `described in our application for Letters Patent for pneumatic feet, vfiled October 6th,r 1919, `Serial Number 328,832.l The object of our vinventim is to provide a4 durable, a practical 'and an inexpensive artificial pneumatic foot, whose ease of operation and smoothness of action are such that the wearer will experiencelittle Orino jar or discomfort tothe leg o r body when he throws his weight upon the foot in the act of walking.

With these and` other Aobjects view,v

which mayv be incident to the use of the improvements, the invention consists in the parts Vand combinations thereof hereinafter set forth and claimed, with the understanding that the several necessary elements constituting the same may be varied in proportions and arrangementV without departing from the nature and scope of the invention.

In order to make the invention more clearly understood, there are shown, in the accompanying drawings, means for carrying the same into practical effect without limiting the improvements in their useful applications to the particular constructions, which, for the purpose of explanation, have been made the subject of illustration.

In said drawingsv Figure l is a vertical sectional view of our pneumatic foot;

Fig. 2 is a detail plan view Of the bottom of the foot, a portion of the covering being removed soV as to more clearly show the arrangement of the wires or springs embedded therein;

Fig. 3 is a detail plan view of the heel of our pneumatic foot showing the opening therein for the introduction of the innen tube; and v Fig. 4 is a horizontalsectional view taken along the line 4-4 of Fig. l.

Similar reference characters designate Specification ofLetters` Patent. v133511,11"{3/id,Se-p13 14:, 1920. Application filedy February 9,1;'920' Serial No. 35%,1'84. 'I i.

411kt pttrts et 'features in the 'ssvsrtti gtt'ss of the drawings. v

Referring to Fig. l, the Vletter shows the lowerportiorn of an artificial leg, and the letters B, C, D represent spring ,steelfasteners or' supporters whichfare embedded in the fabrie'walls `of the covering or casing l, three onf each sideof the foot,a`t or about tht sans; the suppstt'sfs E, ln," tutti those,

oppositely located, being forked at their lower ends. Their position with respect to the foot and with respect to' each other is more clearlyshownfin cross section inFig.

`4. As shown in Fig. 1 there isfa hole in each supporter near its upper endvso as' to permitof insertion of a' screw` Or bolt ,to secure the upper portiony of o'urarticial foot ,to the lower 'end ofthe woodenleg which extends upwstdiythtrsftsm. At and' t above the point lindicated by the line 4-4 ctvsingssn be tightly laced atthisptint Habout the lowerY portion ofthe artificial leg thus assist ifi Emily maintaining Vvtts vin Fig. i', the front psrtitn turthe tutti# coveringis slotted, see letter E, Fig. 4, and we provide eyelets and laces F'solthat'the ber fabric in which is embedded sprin'grsteelv I strips or bands, 4, as more clearly shown in v n Fig. 2, the purpose of which is to make the structure strong and4 durable andat the` same time to assist in giving a spring-like motion to the foot when the same is in use `in the act of walking.

Both leather and canvas have been found 1n practlce to be unsultable as an outer covering or casing, but rubberl fabric, such as what lighter texture, has 4l`proved very satisfactory.

Referring again to Fig. 1, it willbenoted Y that the steel strips orbands 4, begin at a 7100i/VVV i point slightly above theA instep, continue' down to and over the toe 6, curvingv back- The rubber abris in which vthe Steel springs are embedded, while ofstrong and durable construction, is however, made withV Y a due regardto the cOrInfOll' 0f thel wearer, 1,17() y i used .in automobile tires, although of some-f Y and in varying degrees of thickness, a casing for a man of heavy weight requiring a stronger and heavier construction than one v necessary.

Referring now to Fig. 3, it will be observed that a portionof the casing is 'cut away or slotted in such manner as tor permit ofthe insertion ofthe inner tube or bladder 3, and laces and eyelets 9 are provided along the edges of said opening so that the parts may be tightly laced after the inner tube or bladder is in place.

What we claim is: f y

l. In an artificial foot, the combination of an outer casing vof rubber or rubber fabric substantially of the shape of the human foot, its upper part being provided with metallic braces or supports embedded inthe fabric on each side of the leg at or about ,the location of the ankle and means to secure them Y .to an artificial leg, with an opening in the outer casing for the insertion of an inner tube, an inner tube of soft rubber substantially of the configuration of the outer casing, adapted to fit within the latter and means which will permit and control the inflation of the inner tube. I

,2. Inan artificial foot, the combination of an outer casing of rubber or rubber fabric substantially of the shape of the human f foot, its upper part being provided with metallic braces or supports embedded in the fabricon each side of the leg at or about the location of the ankle and means to secure them to an artificial leg, with an opening in the heel of the outer casing for the insertion of an inner tube, an inner tube of soft rubber substantially Vof the configuration of the vouter casing, adapted to fitwithin the-latter and means which will permit and control th infiation of the inner tube.

3. In an artificial-'foot`the combination of an outer casing of rubber orrrubberfabf ric substantially of the shape of the human foot, its upper part being provided with metallic braces or supports embedded in the Y fabric at substantially opposite points on each side of the leg at or about the location of the ankle to secure it to an artificial leg,

vsaid upper vpart being further provided .with

a slotted opening therein and means for ltightly drawing its marginal edges vclose about the artificial leg and an opening in; A

the heel of said casing for the insertion of aninner tube, with aninner tubeof soft rubber substantially of the .configuration of the lower part of the-outer casing, adapted to lit within the latter and means which will permit and control the inationof "the inner tube. Y-

In testimony whereof kwe aiiix our signatures. Y

- Y LEWIS DODGr,EV v

CHARLIE e B. ponen;

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5443529 *Feb 19, 1993Aug 22, 1995Phillips; Van L.Prosthetic device incorporating multiple sole bladders
US5458656 *Dec 20, 1993Oct 17, 1995Flex-FootEnergy-storing prosthesis leg pylon vertical shock leg
US5486209 *Jul 1, 1994Jan 23, 1996Phillips; Van L.Foot prosthesis having auxiliary ankle construction
US5509938 *Jan 4, 1994Apr 23, 1996Phillips; Van L.Prosthetic foot incorporating adjustable bladder
US5514185 *Jan 21, 1994May 7, 1996Phillips; Van L.Split foot prosthesis
US5549714 *Jan 12, 1995Aug 27, 1996Phillips; Van L.Symes foot prosthesis
US5593457 *Sep 22, 1995Jan 14, 1997Phillips; Van L.Foot prosthesis having auxiliary ankle construction
US5766265 *Jun 7, 1995Jun 16, 1998Phillips; Van L.Prosthetic foot having curved integral support
US5976191 *Oct 8, 1996Nov 2, 1999Phillips; Van L.Foot prosthesis having curved forefoot
US6019795 *Jun 15, 1998Feb 1, 2000Phillips; Van L.Curved prosthesis
US6406500Nov 2, 1999Jun 18, 2002Van L. PhillipsFoot prosthesis having curved forefoot
US6443995Dec 22, 2000Sep 3, 2002Barry W. TownsendProsthetic foot
US6527811Dec 16, 1997Mar 4, 2003Van L. PhillipsFoot prosthesis with modular foot plate
US6743260Jul 31, 2001Jun 1, 2004Barry W. TownsendProsthetic foot
US6936074Mar 2, 2004Aug 30, 2005Barry W. TownsendProsthetic foot
US7108723Jun 10, 2004Sep 19, 2006Townsend Barry WProsthetic foot
US20020087216 *Feb 25, 2002Jul 4, 2002Atkinson Stewart L.Prosthetic walking system
Classifications
U.S. Classification623/47, 206/524.2, 623/56
International ClassificationA61F2/66, A61F2/60
Cooperative ClassificationA61F2/66, A61F2/602, A61F2002/6614
European ClassificationA61F2/66, A61F2/60B