Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1353720 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 21, 1920
Filing dateNov 26, 1919
Priority dateNov 26, 1919
Publication numberUS 1353720 A, US 1353720A, US-A-1353720, US1353720 A, US1353720A
InventorsNunes Carvalho David
Original AssigneeNunes Carvalho David
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process and composition for the protection of monetary and other documents
US 1353720 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. N. CARVALHO.

PROCESS AND COMPOSITION FOR THE PROTECTION OF MONETARY AND OTHER DOCUMENTS.

APPLICATION FILED NOV. 26, 1919.

1,358,720, Patented Sept. 21, 1920,

WITNESSES V l/VVE/VTUR '7 fiar/d/i [WM/ho.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

DAVID NUNES CARVAL HO, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

PROCESS AND COMPOSITION FOR THE PROTECTION OF MONETARY AND OTHER DOCUMENTS.

Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Sept. 21, 1920.

Application filed November 26, 1919. Serial No. 340,884.

To all whom it may concem:

Be it known that I, DAVID N. CARVALHO, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of the city of New York, borough of Manhattan, county and State of New York, have invented a new and Improved Process and Composition for the Protection of Monetary and Other Documents, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

This invention relates to means for the protection of negotiable and other papers,

- and has reference more particularly to a substance which may be rubbed over the writing of a negotiable or other document, and after such treatment it will be 'impossible for said writing to be erased or fraudulently changed in any way, without permanent injury to said writing.

An object of this invention is to provide a means for the protection of monetary and other documents which may be easily and cheaply applied.

Another object of this invention-is to provide a protective means of the class described which will prevent any writing on the paper after the application of the protective means, and will prevent the erasure of the writing by chemical or mechanical erasers.

A further object of this invention is to provide a protective means of the class de scribed which may be applied to any white or colored paper and said paper will be dis.- colored or blurred by any attempt at removing the writing with a commercial or other ink eradicator.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a protective means of the class described which may be applied over writing and any subsequent attempts to change said writing by the application of chemical eradicators will serve to deepen the color of the writing rather than remove it.

Many methods are in vogue to protect checks and other documents, but as a rule they are more or less futile, because they can be easily circumvented by a clever forger. One of these methods is the punching of an inscription in or on checks which would limit the amount of money to be paid on the presentation of said check. While this method offers a certain degree of protection, it requires the use of an expensive machine which can notbe carried around conveniently by a person, neither is the name of the payee protected on said check. Specially prepared papers have also been and are still made which are impregnated with chemicals or are coated with tints or colored designs which are destroyed and disappear when any ink eradicator is applied so as to make it unfitted for presentation at a bank; This method is largely futile because the forger can apply the eradicators with a fine brush only overthe ink lines themselves and then with a pencil brush can tint the paper to make it look as if it had not been tampered with. After restoring the paper to its original color, any amount can easily be written in Where the previous writing, had existed. Due to many failures of the aforementioned methods, millions of dollars are lost every year by the raising of checks, drafts, and other negotiable paper.

In order to circumvent any attempts to raise the face value of negotiable paper or to make erasures on the same, I provide a material which is composed largely of a which are commercially sold as ink eradicators, and which commonly contain one solution of weak acids with a second solution of sodium hypochlorite'or its equiva--' lent, said solutions being applied to the writing in. the order named. If an attempt is made to erase the writing with a rubber or other mechanical eraser, said eraser will slide over the treated surface of the paper and will only erase said writing after permanent injury to the paper, which would be easily noticed.

In order to further circumvent any attempts at changing a negotiable paper, I preferably but not necessarily mix with said wax, anilin, or one or more of its derivatives. If anilin is treated with chlorid of lime it turns the anilin first purple and then brown.- Thus when the wax containing anilin is rubbed over writing on a piece of paper, a treatment with an ink eradicator will stain the wax and the paper so that any attempt at changing the writing will be easily detected by any intelligent person without the use of a microscope or some other inconvenient method. Other ink eradicators sold commercially, contain oxidizing agents which if applied to anilin will turn it brown or other color.

My composition is translucent when rubbed on writing so that said Writing may be seen just as distinctly as before the application of said composition. Furthermore, when an ink eradicator is applied to the writing which has been treated with my composition, the wax is impervious to the eradicator solution and the distinctness of the writing is increased rather than diminished. My composition may be used on any white or colored paper, or on the so-called safety papers with equally good results. lVhile I have mentioned anilin or its derivatives as an ingredient in my composition, any other suitable substance may be used which will react with ink eradicators to give a colored blot or stain which may be easily detected.

Reference is to be had to the accompanying drawing forming a part of this specification in which it is understood that the drawing is merely illustrative of two forms of my invention, and in which Figure l is an elevation of my composition put up in the form of a pencil.

Fig. 2 is a central sectional View through Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a modified form of the pencil.

Referring to the accompanying drawing by numerals, 10 indicates my aforementioned composition formed into a stick about the size of a lead pencil, and having any convenient shaped casing 11 such as those ordinarily found on lead pencils. In Fig. 3 my composition is wrapped with paper 12 such as is ordinarily found in commercial crayons. These two illustrated forms represent my preferred method of preparing the composition for use, but said composition can take any other suitable form.

The illustrated examples will be very cheap to construct and may be sold at small cost. It is only necessary to make one definite stroke of the composition 10 over the writing on a negotiable paper in order to apply a sufiicient coating of my safety composition.

Having thus described my invention, 1 claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

1. A composition of matter for the protection of monetary and other documents consisting of a waxy material and anilin.

2. A composition of matter for the protection of monetary and other documents consisting of a waxy material and a derivative of anilin.

3. A composition of matter for the protection of monetary and other documents which consists of bees wax and anilin.

4. A process for the protection of name tary and other documents which consists in treating the writing thereon with a mixture of a waxy material and anilin.

5. A process for the protection of monetary and other documents which consists in treating the writing thereon with a mixture of a waxy material and an anilin derivative.

6. A process for the protection of monetary and other documents which consists in coating the writing on said documents with a thin layer of a composition consisting of a waxy material and anilin.

7. A process for the protection of monetary and other documents which consists in coating the writing on said documents with a thin layer of a composition consisting of a waxy material and an anilin derivative.

8. A'process for the protection of monetary and other documents which consists in coating the writing of said documents with a thin layer of bees wax mixed with anilin.

9. A process for the protection of monetary and other documents which consists of coating the writing on said documents with a thin layer of a mixture of bees wax and an anilin derivative.

10. A process for the protection of monetary and other documents which consists in coating the writing on said documents with a thin layer of a mixture of waxy material, and a substance which will discolor the paper of said document and said waxy material when any chemical ink eradicators are applied to said writing.

DAVID NUNES CARVAILHQ.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4779558 *Aug 14, 1986Oct 25, 1988Pierce Companies, Inc.Image permanence device
US4869921 *Jun 30, 1988Sep 26, 1989Pierce Companies, Inc.Image permanence method
US5789019 *Jul 17, 1995Aug 4, 1998Alagao AktiengesellschaftMethod for protecting against forgery sheet-like printed documents
WO1988001205A1 *Aug 14, 1987Feb 25, 1988Data Card CorpImage permanence method and device
Classifications
U.S. Classification427/7, 427/288, 106/270, 106/31.12, 283/95
International ClassificationD21H21/40, D21H21/46
Cooperative ClassificationD21H21/46
European ClassificationD21H21/46