Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1354319 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 28, 1920
Filing dateJun 17, 1920
Priority dateJun 17, 1920
Publication numberUS 1354319 A, US 1354319A, US-A-1354319, US1354319 A, US1354319A
InventorsLowe Robert G
Original AssigneeLowe Robert G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sand-sifter
US 1354319 A
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R- G. LOWE.

SAND SIFTER.

v APPLICATION FILED JUNE 17. 1920. 1 ,354,31 9, Patentedsept. 28, 1920.

2 SHEETSSHEET I.

Refill! owe 85 a- R. G. LOWE. SAND SIFTER. APPLICATION FILED .IUNIE I7. 1920.

Patented Sept. 28, 1920.

2 SHEETSSHEET 2.

Iii IIIIIIM' 1 3+" gmznl'o'a Rob QWY/ ow Q/ 15 W PATENT OFFICE.

ROBERT G, LOWE, OF GLAWSON, MICHIGAN.

SAND-SIFTER.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Sept. 28, 1920.

Application filed June 17, 1920. Serial No. 389,602.

/ T all whom it may 0mm Be it known that 1, ROBERT G. LowE, a citizen of the United States, and residing at Clawson, in the county of Oakland and State of Michigan, have invented a new and Improved Sand-Sifter, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to means for shaking and agitating sieves and screens and other containers for foundry and builders sand and other granular substances, and for liquids, and its object is to provide a device ofthis character which is readily transportable as a unit, which shall have maximum capacity, which shall be simple in construction and which shall not be liable to get out of order.

This invention consists in the combination 'of an electric motor comprising the usual armature and its shaft and a field housing of any desired type, of a casing in which the motor housing isrigidly mounted with the armatureshaft in upright position, of an eccentric at-the upper end of the armature shaft, a supporting frame forthe casing, and a container such as a screen, sieve or riddle resiliently mounted on said supporting frame and means connecting the container to the eccentric on the shaft so'that the container will receive a gyratory movement from said eccentric.

It also consists in the details of construction illustrated in the accompanying drawing and particularly pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings, Figure 1 is an elevation of a sand sifter embodying my improvements. Fig. 2 is a plan on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1. Fig. 3 is a plan of the eccentric for moving the sand receptacle, the cover being broken away, on the line 33 of Fig. 4. Fig. 4 is a central vertical section of the sand sifter. Fig. 5 is an elevation of a sand sifter when mounted on three legs.

Similar reference characters refer to like parts throughout the several views.

The prime requisites of an efi'ective sand sifter for foundries are speed of operation or great capacity, simplicity of construction, and portability. A suitably inclosed elec-' tric motor mounted below the screen has proven itself to be the ideal motive power, as a structure thus equipped may be suspended from an overhead track and may travel along just above the sand piles on the molding floor while the workmen shovel in the sand when standing at both sides of such 'the sand must be lifted, and that power should be supplied to the sifter through the suspending or supporting mechanism.

Sand sifters of this character now on the market lack proper operative connections between themotor and the sieve, and the present invention relates to the mounting of the sieve on the motor support and to the means wherebythe screen is moved relative to the motor and its support. The motor is provided with a housing 1 secured to the support 2 in any desired manner,.screws 3 preferred, the casing being a ring to which a shell 4 is secured to exclude dust. Two sockets 5 on the casing receive the inner ends of the pipes 6 which connect to the upright pipes 7 by means of the Ts 8. A connector 9 at the upper ends of the pipes 7 unites them and receives the suspending ring 10. The line wires 11 and 12 pass through these pipes 6 and 7 to the-motor. These pipes 6 and 7 constitute the supporting arms for the sifter.

The armature shaft 14 is carried by the housing 1 in proper bearings 15 and 16 and has an eccentric 17 secured to its upper end, and I prefer tosecure a fiy-wheel 18 to the armature shaft just below the eccentric to absorb the irregularities in the stresses on the shaft. A sieve or other container 19 of any desired character is mounted on the three arms 20, being positioned by the brackets 22 and the screw 23 mounted in one of the brackets. These arms connect to the ring 24., between which and the eccentric 17 is any desired type of bearing 25. A plate 26 may be secured to the ring 24 to exclude dust from this bearing and from the eccentric. The supporting frame for the sieve 19 is shown supported by three springs 27, one of which may rest on a saddle 28 secured to one of the pipes 6 while the other two rest on'the ends of a bracket 29 mounted on the sieve is moved is as much greater than that through which the motor moves. The eccentricity of the member 17 need not be more than one-half inch in order to accomplish the intended purpose and in many cases may be as little as one-fourth inch.

The structure just described is adapted to be supported from overhead tracks so that it can be readily moved to any desired loca tion. In Fig. 5 I have shown a sifter whose motor support 30 has three horizontal bars 31 each connecting to the upper end of a leg 32 whose lower end terminates in a heavy ball or other weight'33. The structure of this device is otherwise the same as that above described. a

The proportions and sizes of the several parts of this sifter may all be changed by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of my invention as set forth in the following claims.

I claim 1. In combination, an'electric motor embodying a vertical armature shaft, a support for the motor, an eccentric secured to the upper end of the shaft, a container mounted above the motor and movable relative thereto, yieldable means for supporting the container on the support for the motor,

and a ring connected to the container with which the eccentric engages.

2. In combination, an electric motor embodying a vertical armature shaft, a support for the motor embodying tubular arms connected at their upper ends, an eccentric on the upper end of the shaft, a sieve mounted above the motor and movable relative to the connected to said motor support, -a rin container into which t e eccentric extends, arms extending from the-ring to said container, and springs between the motor support and said arms to receive the weight of the container.

3. In combination, a motor support and means to suspend the same, a container above the support and arms between the motor support and the container upon which the container rests, compression springs mounted between the motor support and said arms to receive the weight of the con-' .tainer and permit gyratory movement thereof relative to the motor support, a motor within said support, and means connecting the motor to the container to impart gyratory movement thereto.

4. In combination, an electric motor embodying a vertical armature shaft and an' by which said arms and the ring 'connect-- ing them are permitted a limited gyratory movement when the eccentric rotates, and a container mounted on said arms.

5. In combination, an electric motor embodying a, vertical armature shaft, a support for the motor, an eccentric secured -to the upper end of the shaft, a sifter mounted above the motor and movable relative thereto, a ring connected to the sifter with which the eccentric engages, and a fiy-wheel mounted on said shaft between the eccentric and the motor housing to substantially absorb the irregularities in the stresses on said shaft due to irregular loadings of the sifter and prevent injury to the motor thereby.

6. In combination, an electric motor embodying a vertical armature shaft, a support for the motor, an eccentric secured to one end of the shaft, a container mounted adjacent the eccentric end of said shaft and movable relative thereto, yieldable means for transmitting the weight of the container and its load to the support for the motor, and a ring connected to the container with which the eccentric engages.

ROBERT G. LOWE.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2522906 *Apr 3, 1947Sep 19, 1950Smith Leo RChristmas tree vibrator
US2681735 *Oct 9, 1951Jun 22, 1954Adams Henry VSupport for strainer containers
US2840871 *Dec 9, 1955Jul 1, 1958Kaiser Aluminam & Chemical CorApparatus and method for casting metal
US2875036 *Jun 11, 1956Feb 24, 1959Stora Kopparbergs Bergslags AbMethod for treating molten metal
US2950819 *Jun 18, 1956Aug 30, 1960State Steel Products IncGyratory separator
US3206029 *Jul 16, 1962Sep 14, 1965Russell Const LtdStraining and sifting apparatus
US3277732 *Dec 11, 1964Oct 11, 1966Wahl Eugene AElectro-mechanical gyrator
Classifications
U.S. Classification209/366, 209/332, 310/91, 366/9, 310/81, 209/409, 366/114
International ClassificationB07B1/38, B07B1/28
Cooperative ClassificationB07B1/38
European ClassificationB07B1/38