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Publication numberUS1354998 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 5, 1920
Filing dateOct 24, 1917
Priority dateOct 24, 1917
Publication numberUS 1354998 A, US 1354998A, US-A-1354998, US1354998 A, US1354998A
InventorsPaulson Charles E
Original AssigneePaulson Charles E
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Walkway-grating
US 1354998 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. E. PAULSON.

WALKWAY (SEATING.

AIPLICATION FILED net. 24, 1917.

1,354,993 Patented Oct. 5,1920.

f 'T .7 T? I? 1 S H H H 1 1| B B b b 5 l H I II W ITN E 55 E S INVENTOR WWW A3,, ATTORNEYS UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

WALKWAY-GRATING.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 5, 1920.

Application filed October 24, 1917. Serial No. 198,354.

To all whom't'it may concern:

Be it known-that I, CHARLES E. PAULSON, a citizen of the United States of America, residing in Montclair, in the county of Es sex and State of New Jersey, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Walkway-Gratings, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to walkway gratings, and is particularly useful for area- Ways or openings in streets for lighting and ventilation, although such gratings may be used for various other purposes, such as guards, registers, platforms, stairways, etc. The object of my invention is to provide a grating having a non-slip surface of neat appearance, and so constructed as to use the material to the best advantage, with the least amount of labor. It is also designed to provide a maximum amount of ventilation with the least obstruction to light, and with the component members so combined and interconnected that they brace each other and distribute the local loads throughout the grating members. A further object is to avoid the use of expensive bending, iveting, or special slotting arrangements, nd to eliminate all sharp angular crevices now found in some types of gratings in use, which have a tendency to catch papers, hold dirt and moisture, and prevent thorough painting of the joints.

In the accompanying drawings,

Figure 1 is a planview of a grating in which my invention is embodied in one form;

Figs. 2 and 3 are cross sections .onthe lines AA, B.-l3, Fig. 1, respectively;

Fig. 4 is a perspective of portion of the grating;

Fig. 5 is a cross section similar to Fig. 2,

showing various modified types of cross bars.

The grating as here shown comprises a series of parallel girdervb'ars a having a series of transverse holes punched at predetermined intervals along the upper portions of the girders. These holes intersect the edge of the girder which forms the supportin face of the grating. Passing transverse y through alined holes in the girders are cross bars I), the cross sections of which correspond to the contour of the holes. The size of the cross bars is such that they enter the holes in the girders only ith a close, drive fit. They arev consethe grate and thus form a non-slip surface. In Figs. 1 to 4, the cross bars are shown square in cross section, and so arranged that one of the corners of the square projects above the grate surface.

While, as stated, the cross bars I) are. driven through the holes in the girders a with a drive fit, additional rigidity can be secured by hammering down the girder at the points 01: upon the cross bar; that is to say, on each side of the slot formed in the upper face inthe girder by the punching of the aperture to receive the cross bar; or again, ears 3 may be offset from the metal of the cross bar adjacent the girders by a hammer and chisel or other tool.

By so arranging the cross bars that their larger diameter lies below the surface of the grating, they are firmly locked in the girders, and no special operation is necessary to secure the cross bars in place. Moreover, this arrangement of the cross bars has the mechanical effect of transmitting local loads more effectively to adjacent portions of the grating.

While a cross bar of square section b is preferred by reason of the fact that no special manufacture of this bar is necessary, it being a standard article on the market, bars of various other cross sections may be utilized, and I have indicated some of these in Fig. 5 Thus, at c I have shown a cylindrical cross bar; at (Z, a triangular cross bar; and at e, a bar of trapezoidal section, at f an octagonal bar and at g a small angle bar. In all of the constructions it will be noted that the upper portion of the crossbar projects slightly above the grate surface, and that the cross bar has a normal section of such shape that it is of greater diameter below the surface of the grate than-at the grate surface, so that it is automatically locked in position when driven in into engagement transversely of the girders.

Various other modifications will readily occur to those skilled in the art, which do not depart from what I claim as my invention. l

I claim as my invention:

1. A walkway grating comprising a series of" parallel rigid girder bars, spaced closely together to afford a foot support,

said girder bars being pierced by apertures intersecting the girders at the face of the grating, and being of greater diameter below the face of the grating than at its surface, in combination with rigid cross bars driven transversely through the holes in said girders and corresponding therewith in their normal cross section.

2. A walkway grating comprising a series of parallel rigid girder bars, spaced closely together to afford a foot support, said girder bars being pierced by apertures intersecting the girders at the face of the ating, and being of greater diameter beow the face of the grating than at its surface, in combination with rigid cross bars driven transversely through the holes in said girders and corresponding therewith in their normal cross section, said bars extending slightly beyond the supporting surface of the grating to afford a non-slip surface.

3. A walkway grating comprising a series of parallel rigid girder bars spaced closely together to afford a foot support, said girder bars being pierced by apertures intersecting the girders at the face of the grating, together with cross bars corresponding in section to the apertures in the girders and having a drive -fit therewith transversely of the girders, one of said members being offset below the face of the grating into engagement with the other member to lock the parts together.

4. A walkway grating comprising parallel rigid girder bars spaced closely together to afford a foot support, said girders being pierced by apertures intersecting said girders at the surface of the grating, in combination with cross bars of rectangular section driven through said apertures transversely of the girders and having corner edges extending slightly above the face of' the grating to afford a non-slip surface.

In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification.

CHARLES E. PAULSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2477228 *Dec 21, 1945Jul 26, 1949Beulah H BatesGrating
US3057271 *Dec 13, 1957Oct 9, 1962Aluminum Co Of AmericaCast structural gratings
US3086935 *Jan 25, 1962Apr 23, 1963Edward F GrohAssembly of parallel plates
US3101309 *Jan 25, 1962Aug 20, 1963Edward F GrohFastener for an assembly of plates
US3391513 *Jun 22, 1966Jul 9, 1968W. Bartlett JonesSanitary grillwork
US3837131 *Aug 14, 1972Sep 24, 1974A BisschopsCast concrete construction
US4102102 *Jul 15, 1977Jul 25, 1978Greulich Thomas ANonwelded metal grating
US4928471 *Jun 8, 1988May 29, 1990Ohio Gratings, Inc.Grating construction
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/669, 52/667
International ClassificationE04C2/30, E04C2/42
Cooperative ClassificationE04C2/423
European ClassificationE04C2/42A1A