Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1355718 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 12, 1920
Filing dateFeb 2, 1918
Publication numberUS 1355718 A, US 1355718A, US-A-1355718, US1355718 A, US1355718A
InventorsOf Ships Against Mines
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Borne
US 1355718 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. V. USBORNE.

APPARATUS FOR THE PROTECTION OF SHIPS AGAINST MINES AND THE LIKE. APPLICATION FILED FEB. 2, 19m.

1,355,718. Patented 00m; 12, 192i}.

9 SHEETS SHEET 1.

Invent-0r.

c. v; USBORNE.

APPARATUS FOR THE PROTECTION OF SHIPS AGAINST MINES AND THE LIKE.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 211918.

Patented' Oct. 12,1920.

9 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

oo wwwu II IIIII II C. V. USBORNE.

'APPARATUS FOR THE PROTECTION OF SHIPS AGAINST MINES AND THE LIKE.

7 APPLICATION FILED FEB. 2, 191-8.

Patented Oct. 12,1920.

' 9 SHEETS- SHEET 3.

C. V. USBORNE.

APPARATUS FOR THE PROTECTION OF SHIPS AGAINST MINES AND THE LIKE.

. APPLICATION FILED FEB. 2| I918.

Patented Oct. 12, 1920.,

9 SHEETS-SHEET 4.

Inventor.

I c. v. ussoamz. APPARATUS FOR THE PROTECTION OF SHIPS' AGAINST MINES AND THE LIKE APPLICATION FILED FEB. 2. 1918.

Patented Oct. I2, 1920.

9 SHEETS-SHEET 5.

C. V, USBORNE.

APPARATUS FOR THE PROTECTION OF SHIPS AGAINST M|NES AND THE LIKE.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 2 1918 Patented Oct. 12, 19%.

9 SHEETSE-SHEET 6.

[nvenfnr C. V! USBORNE. v APPARATUS FOR THE PROTECTION OF SHIPS AGMNST MINESYAND THE LIKE.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 2,1918.

Patented 06 12, 1920.,

9 SHHTS-SHEET 7.

U. V. USBORNE.

APPARATUS FORTHE PROTECTION OF SHIPS AGAINST MINES AND THE LIKE.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 2, I918.

' ,7 Patented 001;. 1920.

9 SHEETS T 8- c. v. USBORNE. APPARATUS FOR THE PROTECTION OF SHIPS AGAINST MINES AND THE LIKE.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 2, I918.

Patented 001;. 12, 1920.

9 SHEETS-SHEET 9.

ll: nhnhlllh H H I IH H WWWWHHW I WI I H H I I I UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

' CECIL VIVIAN USBORNE, OF WESTMINSTER, LONDON, ENGLAND.

APPARATUS FOR THE PROTECTION OF SHIPS AGAINST MINES AND THE LIKE.

Application filed. February 2, 1918.

To all whom it may concern:

'Be it known that I, Cncrr. VIVIAN Us- BORNE, a subject of the King of Great Britain, residing at United Service Club, Pall Mall, Westminster, in the county of London, England, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Apparatus for the Protection of Ships Against Mines and the like, of which the following is a specification.

This invention has for its object the provision of apparatus for protecting ships against moored mines and like submerged bodies charged with explosives and adapted to be exploded by contact with the ship. To this end, according to the present invention the mines are caused to be deflected away from the path of the ship, and if desired,

the mooring ropes connecting the mine to the sinker or other anchorage, cut.

The invention consists in a construction of body which is towed from the ship from a point preferably well down below the water line and which when in motion tows out from and to an extent downward with respect to the vertical plane containing the fore and aft line of the ship.

The invention further consists in the employment'of wires trailing from the bodies with or without small kites or the like on the free ends of the wires.

The invention further consists in the constructional form of device employed on the ship, and also at or in the neighborhood of the kite whereby the towing wire and the kite can perform their desired functions in a satisfactory manner.

According to this invention the body which will be hereinafter referred to as a kite is constructed to accord more or less to the shape of the planes used on aircraft,

that is to say with a cambere d back surface,

and a front surface which may be uniplanar or composed of two or more flat or curved surfaces, or a combination of both kinds of surfaces, the body being in general bluff pointed at the leading edge and of considerable taper toward the rear edge. The kites are provided if necessary with weights arranged low, down, and with tail fins or rudders.

The kites are above'described' are em.

ployed either for deflecting mines, or for cutting the mooring ropes of the same, the

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Oct. 12, 1920.

Serial No. 215,221.

after referred to as deflecting kites and cutting kites. With the former type of kite, the moorings of mines are engaged by the cable towing the kite, and deflected away from the path of the ship, and itwill be obvlous that on the kite slipping the mine, it Wlll return to its position and will still be a source of danger to other ships.

With the latter type the mooring is severed, whereupon the mine rises to the surface, disclosing its presence and is treated 1n any of the usual ways for destroying the same, whereby the section of a mine field within the sweeping area of the kites is de stroyed and protection afforded not only for the ship effecting the severance of the moormg, but also otherships following the same course.

The accompanying drawings illustrate constructional forms of kites and auxiliary devices as hereinbefore referred to. I

Figures 1 to 5 are more or less diagram-- matic views corresponding to central horizontal sections of various forms of kites. k tFig. 6 is a top plan view of a deflecting Fig. 7 is a part sectional elevation of the kite shown in Fig. 6.

Fi 8 isa vertical section on the line Al of Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 illustrates the details of the ballast weight.

Fig. 10 is a plan view of a towing span used in the device illustrated in Figs. 6 and 7 Fig. 11 is an elevation of the towing span, 1616 gross section being shown at DD and Fig. 12 is a plan view of a cutting kite.

Fig. 13 is a part sectional elevation of the kite shown in Fig. 12.

Fig. 14 is a vertical section on Fig. 12 looking toward the forward end of the kite.

Fig. 15 is a longitudinal section of an anchorage for the towing wire.

Fig. 16 is a part sectional plan of sliding shoe fitting the stem of the ship.

Figs. 17 and 18 are part sectional elevations of the shoe shown in Fig. 16.

Figs. 19 and 20 are elevation and plan respectively of another form of fitting.

The forms of the kites illustrated com-- prise a cambered back surface 1 and a front surface 2 which may be uniplanar as shown in Fig. 1, or consist of two plan s r es i at desired angles to the chord of the cambered back as in Figs. 2 and 8, or two curved surfaces as shown in Fig. 4 or a plurality of plane surfaces as shown in Fig. 5, such superimposed parts giving increase in volume without altering the efficiency.

The front surface may however, if desired, be of a single curved surface of desired shape, or any desired combination of plane and curved surface as will give effi cent working.

The kites may be formed out of solid wood or built up of timber balks in any suitable way and preferably waterproofed, or may take the form of a watertight hollow steel or metal body.

In the complete deflecting kite as shown in Figs. 6, 9, 10 and 11 the kite conforms to the shape shown in Fig. 1, and projecting from the back surface 1 is a bracket 3 on or to which a weight 4 preferably of stream line form is adjustable secured; the bracket conveniently may comprise a metal plate 5 shaped as shown, supported from the back surface 1 by stays 6, and flanges 7 at the rear end secured in any suitable way.

The kite is provided with a plurality of holes 8, for adjustment of the weight, which is secured in the desired position on the plate 5 by bolts 9. Also the holes provide for additional weights to be added as required either for ballast or to alter the inclination to the vertical of the kite when swimming.

The kite may be provided with protecting metal plating 10 in the neighborhood of the leading edge, and where any fittings are to be secured, on parts which the mooring ropes of mines are likely to rub against.

To the upper and lower extremities of the leading edge of the kite means are provided for connecting the kite to the towing wire. This may conveniently consist of a metal plate 11 secured to and projecting beyond the upper surface of the kite and a projecting plate 12 on the lower surface, this latter plate being either integral with the bracket plate 5 or formed of a separate plate secured in any suitable way. The upper and lower plates are provided with apertures 13 for securing the kite to the towing connections hereinafter described. As shown in Fig. 7, the plates 11, 12 are connected together by a through bolt 1 The rear end of the kite is provided with horizontal tail fins 15 acting as a vertical rudder, secured in any suitable way and if desired a horizon tal rudder 15 may also be provided. The rudder 15' is supported by stays 15 or hinged for adjustment. The fins and rudders damp out oscillation and assist in the depth-keeping of the kite.

The kite is towed by a span, bridle 17, or the like Figs. 10 and 11 of metal or other material, pivoted or rigidly connected to,

or integral with the kite. The apex of the span is shackled to a tow anchorage for the towing wire the other ends of the limbs being pivoted on bolts passing through the apertures 13 in the plates 11, 12. In the form of towing span shown in Figs. 10 and 11 a hollow metal body or casing 18 of stream line form is used containing a wood filling 19 to form the limbs or legs. The apex or common junction of the metal casings is provided with an aperture for securing a tow anchorage 20, Fig. 15, to which a towing wire is secured. The limbs are maintained apart by a stay 21 and the divergent ends of the metal casing are suitably formed for connection to the plates 11, 12.

The shape of the tow anchorage, as will be hereinafter described, the inclination of the legs of the towing span and the connection to the kite are so arranged as to provide a good lead for the mooring rope of the mine, from the towing wire to the kite and also to prevent the formation of any projections, undesirable excrescences, or reentrant portions, such as would retain the mooring rope and cause the mine to tow with the kite.

The-tow anchorage 20 Fig. 15 for this purpose consists of a hollow cone shaped body 22 of small angle and of metal or other suitable material having a bifurcated end 23 to engage over the apex of the towing span the two parts being secured together by the bolt. The cone is provided with a longitudinal bore 24 running from the smaller end for a considerable portion of its length and leading into a chamber 25 of larger dimensions. Within the chamber is provided rubber buflers 26 and a metal cylinder 27 internally coned. The towing wire is led up the longitudinal bore 241 through the rubber buffers 26 and into the metal cylinder 27 above referred to, the strands of the wire being opened out or splayed at the end so as to be contained within the cone shaped part of the cylinders. On the splayed end of the wire occupying its correct position in the cylinder, liquid metal is run in so as to form a solid cone of metal and prevent withdrawal of the towing wire throu h the narrow end of the tow anchorage. 2 screwed plug 28 may conveniently be inserted to keep the cylinder in position. The end of the tow anchorage through which the towing wire passes is cut at an angle of such magnitude as will cause the mooring rope of the mine to pass easily from the towing wire to the tow anchorage and will not allow any abutment against which the mooring rope of a mine can be retained. If desired the longitudinal bore 24 of the anchorage may be lined with rubber.

The deflecting kite above described may, if desired, be provided with a length of cable, wire or the like which trails behind thekite when in motion to ke p the mine de fiected away from the ships hull after the kite has slipped the mooring cable. The

. trailing wire is able to perform this function since the towing rope and kite are caused by the inward thrust of the mooring rope due to the displacement of the mine to move inward toward the ship to a certain degree but when the mine is slipped by the kite, the latter runs out to take up the normal position of running, with the result that the wire is also moved outward, or tends to move outward and so resists and overcomes the inward thrust of the mooring rope, sufficient to keep it deflected until such time as the mine can he slipped without coming into contact with the ship.

The trailing cables end may, if desired, be provided with small kites of efiicient form, either similar to the forms above de scribed or of any other known form, to assist in keeping the trailing cable or the like well out or out and down.

When the form of protection according to my invention is to be applied to a ship having sufficient available power, the cutting form of kite is used. This form of kite may be of any of the shapes shown in Figs. 1 to 5. The form shown in Figs. 12 to 14 is similar to that shown in Figs 2 and 3 that is to say that with a cambered back surface 1 and a front surface 2, composed of two plane surfaces at desired angles to the chord of the cambered portion, forming a triangular prism superimposed on the chord. The front surface 2 may be provided with a wing or wings, vanes or the like 29 eX- tending above and below the kite, this wing portion being also of aeroplane section. The pressure of the fluid on these wings tends to increase the thrust obtained rom the i'iuid, for a kite of given volume and dimensions. The back surface 1 of the kite is provided with a weight 41 arranged near the lower extremity and if desired the weight may be made adjustable and carried in a manner similar to that described with reference to Figs. 6 to 9.

The leading edge of the kite is provided with a curved guard 80 which may take the form of a metal bar or plate formed as shown. Secured to the kite in the neighborhood of the leading edge is a wire cutting device of any suitable character. The wire cutter is mounted in brackets or blocks 31 secured by stays 32, metal strengthening plates 33 being fixed if desired for securing the stays (utter brackets. In the kite shown the wire cutting device is disposed on the longitudinal center line of the kite. The cutter supporting bracket or block 31 is provided with means for securing to the towing wire through the medium of a tow anchorage 20 as above described. The guard 30 and cutter supporting bracket 31 are so shaped as to give a good lead toward-the cutter so that the mooring rope of the mine is caused to be guided into the cutter jaws.

The rear end of the kite is provided with horizontal tail fins 15, a vertical rudder 16, to incline the front surface to a suitable angle for obtaining efficient thrust from the fluid, ant an adjustable horizontal rudder l5 hinged to the bottom tail fin, and provided with a suitable clamping device for securing it in adjusted position.

The deflecting or cutting kites may if desired be provided with any known form of apparatus for automatically controlling one or more of the aforesaid rudders or additional rudders, to regulate the depth running of the kite, any displacement from the set depth line causing the apparatus to opcrate the rudder or rudders to bring the kite back to the set depth line.

Referring now to the fittings on the ship or towing kites as above described, a shoe 5 as shown in Figs. 16 to 18 comprises a section bar 86 bent or otherwise shaped to have an easy fit on the stem and stem bar of the ship. The shoe is adapted to be raised and lowered by means of chains 39 which are shackled to the shoe and taken to a capstan, winch, or other winding gear on the ship. The shoe at its outer extremity is provided with enlargements, flanges, or like 35 provided with apertures 40 to receive a shackle to which the towing wire is connected by a tow anchorage similar to that abz a deszribed although of course it is un ne; essary to have the smaller end inclined as f anchorage at the kite end of the wire. To enable the shoe to be sushorizontally 011 the bow of the ship wh n pulled up above the water, and not in use, shortlengths of chain 41 are fitted to carry the weight of the after part of the shoe. These lengths come slack when-the shoe is in its working position.

The portions of the shoe engaging the stem of the ship are preferably outwardly fiared as shown for ease in working up and down.

The working position of the shoe is arranged so that the point of attachment of the towing wires is kept as low down as the construction of the ship permits.

in the modification the shoe consists of a bracket like member with an outwardly and downwardly projecting limb to which the towing wire-is shackled, and with the two side limbs or wings embracing the side of the ship, rollers, balls or like anti-friction device being provided between the bracket and stem of the ship. This form of shoe may be supported by chains as above described. With the latter form of shoe a lower point of tow can be arranged for, so that the point of tow can be nearly at the level of or below the ships keel. V

The supporting member in another form consists of a flanged or otherwise shaped member to embrare the stem bar, and pivoted at its low r end to the ship in the region of the keel. The upper or outer end of the member is pivotally connected to one or more bars, rods or the like which in turn are pivotally connected to a sliding block, or other member adapted to be lowered and raised about the stem bar by suitable means, such as for example, screw gear. With'this form of apparatus, when the supporting member is not in use, the whole can be made to lie or fit close up against the stem of the ship, and not interfere with any other gear. This form has the advantage that it provides for the point of attachment of the towing wire being low down and well forward.

Another type of fitting specially applicable for ships having a cut away forefoot is illustrated in Figs. 19 and 20, and consists of an outrigger or bridle, or the like 42 rigidly or pivotally mounted, preferably the latter to clump pieces or the like as secured on the sides of the ship. The outrigger 4.2

may be formed of '5' section bars 4:4: bent in.

a manner similar to that shown in Fig. 20 having an outward curve in the vicinity of the stem of the ship, so as to clear the anchor and other fittings during movement of any of the respective fittings. The outrigger is provided with a cross bar 45 having a reentrant bend 46 adapted to engage over the stem bar when the bridle is in the working position.

Suitable cross bracing 4:7 is provided to strengthen the bridle.

To the extremity of the bridle is secured a plate, block or the like e8 provided with apertures, or other means for shackling the towing wire.

An eye 49 is provided on the bridle to which a hauling chain 50 is shackled, the chain being taken to a fair lead 51 on the deck, thence to a winch, capstan or other winding device.

In Fig. 19, the pivoted outrigger is shown in full line for the working position, and in dotted line for the position it occupies when working the anchor, or when in the stowed position, these positions being respectively indicated at 42 and 42 The outrigger type of fitting provides for a point of tow being low down and well ffirward with respect to the bows of the s 1p.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is 1. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back surface being cambered and a towing. connection at the nose of the kite adapted by its form to tow out from the ship, for the purpose specified.

. 2. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kiteof rectangular shape in elevation, the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back section being cambered and a towing connection at the nose of the kite, which is adapted by its form to tow out from the ship for the purpose specified.

3. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, said body having a cambered back surface and a projecting angular front surface of substantially triangular prism shape, and a towing connection at the end of the kite, which is adapted by its form to tow out from the shi for the purpose specified.

4. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, said bodyhaving a cambered back surface and a projecting angular front surface of substantially triangular prism shape, the faces of the projecting angular front being curved and a towing connection at the end of the kite, which is adapted by its form to tow out from the ship, for thepurpose specified.

5. A. towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, said body having a cambered back surface and a projecting angular front surface of substantially triangular prism shape, one of the faces ofthe projecting angular front, at least, being curved and'a towing connection at the end of the kite, which is adapted by its form to tow out from the ship, for the purpose specified.

6. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, said body having a cambered back surface and a projecting angular front surface consisting of a series of angular projections and a towing connection at the end of the kite, which is adapted by its form to tow out from the ship, for the purpose specified.

7. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, said body having a cambered back surface and a projecting angular front surface consisting of a series of prism-shaped projections and a towing connection at the end of the kite, which is adapted by its form to tow out from the ship, for the purpose specified.

8. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back surface of the kite'being cambered. said kite having positive buoyancy and weighted low down so as to displace the center of gravity suiiiciently from the center of buoyancy,-to produce a large dynamic reaction and the body being displaced from its normal equilibrium position, whereby accu rate depth keeping is insured.

9. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water'kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back surface being cambered, said kite providedwith a tail fin for damping oscillation and a towing connection at the nose of the kite, which is adapted by its form to tow out from the ship, for the purpose specified.

10. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back surface being cambered, said kite provided with a tail fin for damping oscillation, an adjustable rudder on said fin and a towing connection at the nose of the kite, which is adapted by its form to tow out from the ship, for the purpose specified.

11. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back surface being cambered, a plane extending beyond the upper and lower faces of the body whereby the outward thrust obtained from the fluid is increased with respect to the total volume and weight. 7

12. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back surface being cambered, a vertical rudder so set, relatively to the body, that the pressure on the rudder due to towing, inclines the front surface of the body to an angle which allows of the effi-v cient thrust from the fluid.

tudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back surface being cambered, a trailing wire for the kite and means for towing said kite.

15. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back surface being cambered, a cutting device for said kite and means by which the mooring rope of the mine is led into the cutter and severed.

16. A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back surface being cambered, and a towing connection at the nose of the kite comprising a slightly coned sleeve, a central bore in said sleeve, an enlargement in the bore, an internally coned cylinder and a resilient bufi'er situated in said enlargement, adapted to receive the conical end of the towing cable positioned inside of said cylinder.

17 A towed body for the protection of ships, comprising a water kite the longitudinal section of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back surface being cambered,said kite provided with rudders and with automatic apparatus controlling at least one rudder adapted to regulate accurately the depth at which the kite runs and to bring the kite back to the set depth line, on displacement therefrom.

18. A towed device for the protection of ships, comprising a series of water kites, the longitudinal section of each of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back surfaces of the kite being cambered and a connection at the nose of each kite adapted by their form to tow out from the ship for the purpose specified.

19. A towed device for the protection of ships, comprising a series of water kites, the longitudinal section of each of which is of aeroplane wing section, the back surfaces of the kite being cambered, trail wires for said kites and a towing connection at the nose of each kite adapted by their form to tow out from the ship for the purpose specified.

CECIL VIVIAN USBORNE.

Classifications
U.S. Classification114/244
International ClassificationB63G9/04, B63G9/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63G7/02
European ClassificationB63G7/02