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Publication numberUS1358173 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 9, 1920
Filing dateSep 13, 1919
Priority dateSep 13, 1919
Publication numberUS 1358173 A, US 1358173A, US-A-1358173, US1358173 A, US1358173A
InventorsFrederick Klein, Penso Marius E
Original AssigneeNat Indicator Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Braiding-machine
US 1358173 A
Abstract  available in
Images(9)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M. E. PENSO Am) F. KLEIN.

BRAIDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 13. 1919.

1,358,173, PatentedNov. 9,1920.

O 0 1 22 I v- 7 W i 63 113 108107 k 3 mmmmlm I Snu urea MW PM $15 Ghana W M. E. PENSO AND F. KLEIN.

BRA'IDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 13, 1919.

1,35 ,173, Patented Now 9,19%-

9 SHEETS-*SHEET 2.

M. E. PENSO AND F. KLEIN.

BRAIDING MACHINE. APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 13, 1919.

1,358,173. Patented Nov. 9, 1920.

9 SHEETS SHEET 3.

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BRAIDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED SEPT-13,1919.

1,358, '1 7'3. Pa tented-Nbv. 9,1920.

9 SHEETS-SHEET 4- my (ltfoiwugn M. E. PENSO AND F. KLEIN.

BRAIDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 13, 1919.

1 ,358 ,1 73. Patented Nov. 9, 1920.

9 SHEETSSHEET 5.

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M. E. PENSO AND F. KLEIN:

BRAIDING MACHINE.

APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 13. 19:9.

" Patented Nov. 9, 192%.,

9 SHEETS-SHEET 6.

M. E. PENSO AND F. KLEIN.

BRAIDING MACHINE. I APPLICATION FILED SEPT-1311919.

1,358,] 73, Patented Nov. 9, 1920.

9 SHEETS-SHEET 7.

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M. E. PENSO AND F. KLEIN;

BRAIDING MACHINE. APPLICATION FILED SEPT. I3, I919.

Patented Nov. 9, 1920.

9 SHEETS-sneer 8.

M. E. PENSO AND F. KLEIN.

BRAIDING MACHINE. APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 13. 1919.

/ Patented Nov. 9, 1920.

9 SHEETS-SHEET 9.

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umreosraras PATENT OFFICE.

T MARIU'S E. PENSO AND FREDERICK KLEIN, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNOBS '1'0 NATIONAL INDICATOR COMPANY, OF LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK, A. COB,-

PORATION on NEW YORK.

BRAIDING-MACHTNE.

T 0 all whom it may concern Be it known that we, MARIUS E. PENso and FREDERICK KLEIN, citizens of the United States, and residents of the borough of Bronx, county of Bronx, city and State of New York, and of the borough of Manhattan, city, county, andState of New York, respectively, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Braiding-Machines, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to that type of machines designed for producing a tubular braided structure, either in the form of a covering for a cord or as a tubularbraided cord or rope. The invention further relates to that type of braiding machines in which two annular series of spools or bobbins are mounted to move in an annular orbit, one series of spools moving in its orbit in the opposite direction to the movement of the other series of spools, and both series of spools being moved in such mannor as to interlace and weave the threads.

One of the main objects of the invention is to mount the bobbins or spools upon free, floating carriers, and to move said carriers around the machine in opposite directions bya series of transfer devices or carriermoving means, and to provide rotary switch devices operating to disconnect the carriers from one transfer device and to cause them to engage the next adjacent transfer device. By this means the carrierswill be advanced around the machine by a successive engagement and disengagement of the rotating transfer devices, said engagement and disengagement'being brought about through the operation of rotating switch devices.

Another object of the invention is to mount the rotating switch de'vices upon the same vertical axis as the transfer devices, the transfer devices being rotated at approximately three times; the speed of the rotating switch devices, so that the switch devices will intercept the carriers at the proper points inthe rotation of the trans fer devices anddivert them so that they will travel around the machine in their proper orbit.

Another object of the invention is to provide a braiding machine of the typeherein indicated, wherein all of the operating parts connected with the movement'of-the bobbin carriers will be rotary, thereby per- Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Nov. 9, 1920.

Application filed September 13, 1919. Serial No. 323,466.

mitting the machine to operate at. a very vantages of the invention, all of which will fully hereinafter appear.

In the drawings, Figure 1 is a side elevation of the machine;

Fig. 2 a plan view thereof;

Fig. 3 a detail plan View of a portion of the base, the rotor or transfer shafts being shown in horizontal sectional view; d I; ig. 4 a plan view of the divided transfer is I Fig. 5 a vertical sectional view thereof;

Fig. 6 a detail sectional view of the oil level indicator;

Fig. 7 a vertical central sectional viewof the machine;

Fig. 8 a vertical sectional view of one of the rotors, the rotor shaft being shown in elevation;

Fig. 9 a horizontal sectional view on the line IX-JX- of Fig. 7

Fig. 10 avertical sectional view of the clutch mechanism, taken approximately on the line XX of Fig. 11;

Fig. 11 a horizontal sectional view taken on the line -XIXI of Fig. 7';

Fig. 12 a vertical sectional View taken on the line XIIXII of Fig.- 11, showing the speed-reducing gears connecting the trans fer disk-driving means to the rotary switchdriving means;

Fig. 13 a detail plan view, showing the operation of the transfer and rotary switch devices;

Fig. 14a view similar to Fig. 13, showing the transfer devices and rotary switch de-v vices advanced from. the position shown in Fig. 13;

Fig. 15 a detail vertical sectional view, showing the engagement ofthe transfer disks and the rotary switch devices with the bobbin carrier;

Fig- 16 a view similar to Fig. 15;

Fig. 17 a plan view showing the complete series of rotary switch devices;

Fig. 18 a detail view of the thread-break s p;

ig. 19 a detail view of the clutch-releasmorals, 1 designates an inverted cup-shaped base, having an integral top 2.' The lower end of the base is covered and closed by a bottom plate 3, said plate being secured in place by means of suitable bolts or other securing devices passing through outwardly extending registering flanges formed on said parts. The joint between these two parts is preferably oil-tight, so that the base forms a receptacle in which a suitable quantity of oil may be contained, so that the operating parts within the base will run in oil. The oil level is preferably about as indicated in Fig. 7 of the drawings; and to permit the operator to know the amount of oil within the base, a float 4 is provided, said float carrying an indicator rod 5 which extends through the top of the casing. The upper wall of the inverted cup which constitutes the upper surface of the base of the machine is provided with a central, depending tubular guide 6; and the lower end of this tubular guide fits the upper end of an upwardly extending annular flange 7 formed centrally on the bottom plate 3. The tubular guide 6 and the annular flange 7 together form a' central tubular guide for the material which is to form the core about which the braiding is to be done, said core passing upwardly vertically through said guide to a take-up drum 8 mounted on a suitable standard 9 which is supported from the base of the machine. The drum 8 is provided with a large bevel gear 10 which meshes with a small bevel gear 11 mounted on the upper end of a vertical shaft 12. The lower end of this shaft 12 extends through the top of the base and carries'a small beveled pinion 13 which meshes with a similar pinion 14-. secured to a horizontal shaft 15., this latter shaft being driven through suitable change gears, as will be more fully hereinafter described. The drum may be given a desired speed to take up the braided material by varying the change gears in a manner which will be more fully hereinafter described.

Supported'on the standards 9 is a vertically adjustablesguide plate 16, said guide plate being of star form, as shown clearly .in

' Fig. 2, the arms thereof being provided with vertical apertures of various sizes, the

-braided material being passed through said apertures on its way to the take-up drum.

.The guide 16 is vertically adjustable in order to bring it close to the braiding point; and, as is well known, the braiding point, that is to say the point at which all of the threads from the bobbins converge, will vary with the speed of the take-up drum and the thickness of the thread.

In the top of the base is formed an annular series of circular depressions or pockets 17 the centers of said annular depressions being equal distances from the center of the base, and said depressions being of such diameter that they overlap or intersect so that they are connected together at their adjoining sides, forming in fact, an annular channel having scalloped or segmental edges, as shown clearly in Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawings. Mounted centrally in each depression or pocket is a vertical shaft 18, said shaft rotating in bearings mounted in the top and bottom of the base, the upper ends of said shafts extending slightly above the top of the base, as clearly illustrated in Figs. 7 and 8 of the drawings. Each of these shafts carries what may be termed a rotor, each rotor being made up of a transfer disk; a rotary switch, and connected gears for rotating the transfer disk and the switch in the same direction but at different speeds. Between the transfer disk and the rotary switch of each rotor is mounted a freely rotatable guide disk, this latter disk serving merely as a guide means adapted to be engaged by the shuttles or shoes mounted on the bobbin carriers, as will be more fully hereinafter described.

On one of the shafts 18 is secured a large beveled gear 19, and meshing with this gear is a smaller beveled pinion 20, said pinion being loosely mounted on the inner end of the main drive shaft 21. The main drive shaft is mounted in a suitable bearing formed in the base of the machine and carries on its outer end a belt wheel 22, as clearly shown in Figs. 8, 9 and 11. The pinion 20 is connected to and disconnected from the main drive shaft by means of a clutch 23, which will be fully hereinafter described. Rigidly connected to the beveled" gear 19 is'a gear wheel 24, said gear wheel being locked to the rotor shaft by means of a rigid collar 25, said collar being locked to the gear by means of a lug-and-slot connection, as indicated in Fig. 8 of the drawings, so that the connected rotor shaft will turn with the beveled gear. The gear 24 meshes with a train of similar gears 26, each of which is rigidly connected to its rotor shaft so that all of the rotor shafts are driven at the same speed, adjacent rotor shafts rotating in opposite directions," aswill be manifest. As indicated in F ig.;8 of the drawings, the beveled gear 19 and the gears 24and 26 are within the base and near the lower ends of the rotor shafts. Rigidly connected to the upper end of each of the rotor shafts is a transfer disk 27, so that said transfer disk will rotate with the shafts and will be driven by the gears 26,24 and beveled gear 19. On each rotor shaft within the base is loosely mounted a switch-operating gear 28; and in each pocket or recess in the top of 'the base is arranged a rotary switch 29, said disk 30, the periphery of said guide disk forming, together wlth I the wall of the pocket 17, an annular raceway or guideway for 'the shuttles or shoes mounted on the bobbin carriers, as will be fully hereinafter described.

The switch-operating gears are rotated preferably at one third the speed of the transfer disks, this reduction in speed being brought about by the interposition of a small speed-reducing pinion 31 mounted on one of the rotor shafts, as shown clearly in Fig. 12. This small pinion meshes with a .large gear 32 mounted on a vertical pin 33 secured between the bottom 3 and the top 2 of the base, said pin being parallel with the rotor shafts. Rigidly connected to the gear 32 is a gear 34 which meshes with a similar gear 35 secured rigidly to or formed integral with one of theswitch rotating gears 28, as illustrated clearly in Fig. 12. It is manifest that through this arrangement of speedreducing gears the switch-operating gears 28 will be rotated at much slower speed than the disk-operating gears. It is manifest that any suitable means or any desired arrangement of gears may be employed to bring about this speed reduction.

Mounted on the vertical pin 33 and rotating with the gear 32 is a worm 36, said worm operating a worm gear 37 mounted on a shaft 38 which extends outwardly through the side of the base and carries a detachable gear 39. The gear 39 meshes with the corresponding gear 40, mounted on the adjacent end of the horizontal shaft 15, and transmits motion to said shaft, which motion is, in turn, transmitted throu h gears 14 and 13, to the take-up drum.

39 and 40 may be detached from them he gears shafts and other gears of different diameters placed thereon in order to vary the relative speeds of the take-up drum and the carrier transfer disks. The gears 39 and 40 are arranged a box 41 which is closed by an outer plate 42, said plate constituting a cover for the gearbox. cover 42 access may be had to the gears 39 and 40, so that they may be readily changed without the necessity of changing or disarranging any of the mechanism mounted within the base. The speed-reducing gears 32 and 34, and the worm 36 are interlocked so that they all turn together by means of interlocking ribs and slots formed in the contacting ends of the hubs thereof.

As shown in Figs. 7 8 and 12, the rotary switch devices 29 are arranged near the bottom' of the pockets 7; and the guide disks 30 are arranged with their upper surfaces on the same level with" the upper surface'of the top plate 2' of the base. The transfer By removing the disks are arranged above the upper surface of the plate 2, and are provided with peripheral notches to receive a pilot roller and the spool-receiving stud of the carrier,

as will be fully hereinafter described. The rotary switch devices are each formed with six radial switch arms 43, which are spaced equal distances apart around the switch device, each of said switch arms being formed at its outer end with an upstanding circumferential flange 44, the outer surfaces of said flanges being arranged close to the annular wall of the pockets 17, and serving as guide cams adapted to be engaged by the pilot shoes of the bobbin carriers, as will be fully hereinafter described. The transfer disks are provided with four semi-circular peripheral recesses 45, located equal distances apart around the transfer disk. Each of these disks is also provided with four rectangular notches 46, arranged intermediate the semi-circular recesses and spaced equal distances apart around the disks. As hereinbefore set forth, the transfer disks have approximately three times the speed of the rotary switch devices; and as the switch devices rotate, the guide flanges 45 are interposed in the path of the pilot shoes on the carriers, and divert them from one pocket 17 into the next adjoining pocket 17, so that the carriers will progress around the machine from one pocket 17 and from one transfer disk to the next adjacent pocket 17 and the .next adjoining transfer-disk. The transfer disk and rotary switch device of each rotor move in the same direction but at different speeds.

As shown in the drawings, the machine is preferably provided with eight rotor shafts and consequently, eight transfer disks and eight rotary switch devices. As shown in Fig. 2, sixteen bobbin carriers are employed, eight of which travel around the machine in one direction, the other eight traveling in the opposite direction, each series of eight traveling around the machine:

in an undulating line, the carriers of one serles lntersectlng the line of movement of the carriers of the other series in order to use inthis machine is illustrated in Figs.

23 to 25 inclusive. It consists of a circular base plate 47, provided with a lateral or radial extension 48. concentrically mounted on the base plate are upper and lower circular plates 49, preferably formed of Wood, suitably treated with a lubricating material, such as parafiin. These upper and lower plates are secured to the main base plate by means of inwardly bent integral ngers 50, which grasp the peripheries of the said plates, as clearly indicated in the drawings. The inner end of thesefinge'rs are bent into annular grooves 51, formed in the plates 49, as clearly indicated in Fig. 25 of the drawings. In the center of the base plate is rigidly mounted a vertical stud 52,

' on which the bobbin is supported, as will be v ends to sharp points, the curved sides therefully hereinafter described. In the radial extension 48 of the base plate is rigidly mounted a pilot post 53, said post extending slightly above the extension 48 and forming a support for the outer end of a horizontal plate 54, the inner end of which is rigidly mounted on the bobbin stud 52, as clearly shown in Fig. 23 of the drawings. Rotatably mounted on the lower end of the bobbin stud close to the lower plate 49 is a large guide shoe or shuttle 55, said shoe being ofv a general ovate form narrowed at its of being on arcs having the same curvature as the annular walls of the pockets 17, so that the sides of said guide shoes will fit accurately against said side walls and travel therearound, as indicated clearly in Figs.

13and 14 of the drawings. Said'guide shoes are substantially equal in length to the diameter ofthe base plate 47, as clearly shown in Fig. 25-of the drawings. Rotat- "ably mounted upon the lower end of the pilot post 53 is a double pilot shoe 56 having an upper shoe 56 and a lower smaller shoe 56 both of these shoes being just below the main guide shoe 55, as clearly shown in Fig. 23 of the drawings. The double pilot shoe is of the same shape as the main guide.- shoe, the curved sidesof the larger member 56 'being adapted to closely fit-the wallsci the pockets 17., and the sides of'the, smaller member of said shoe being adapted i ""to bewclosely engaged by the inner surfaces ofwtheupstanding flanges 44 of the switch arms 43 of the rotary switch devices, as

illustrated in dotted lines in Figs. 13 and 14 of the drawings. The inner surfaces of the main guide shoes 55 are adapted to be engaged by the depending annular flange of the guide disk 30; and the inner surfaces of the larger members 56 of the pilot shoes are adapted also to engage the outer surfaces of the guide disks 30, as illustrated in Figs. 15 and 16 of the drawings. Rotatably mounted on the upper end of the pilot stud or post 53 is a pilot roller 57. The bobbin stud 52 is adapted to be engaged in the semi-circular recesses 45 of the transfer disks, and the pilot roller 57 is adapted to be engaged in the rectangular notches 46 of the transfer disks, as clearly shown in Figs.

13 and 14 of the drawings.

It is thought that the movement of the bobbin carriers around the machine will be readily understood by reference to Figs. 13 to 16, inclusive, of the drawings. As shown in Fig. 13, one bobbin carrier is moving around the machine toward the left, and one is moving around the machine toward the right. For convenience of reference, the carrier which is moving around the machine toward the right is lettered A-B and the carrier which is moving around the machine toward the left is marked A-B. The pilot shoe of the carrier which is moving toward the left is shown by dotted lines in engagement with one of the switch arms, the upstanding flange on said switch arm being interposed in the path of said pilot shoe, and serving to divert it to the next adjacent transfer disk to the left. Said switch arm will serve as the means to divert the pilot shoe into the next adjoining pocket 17 to the left, and the transfer disk moving at a higher speed than the rotary switch device will carry said pilot shoe forward and ahead of the switch arm. The main guide shoe will be brought into engagement with the depending flange of the guide disk, so that said shoe will be guided into the next adj oining pocket 17, the outer surface of said main guide shoe fitting against the annular wall of said pocket. The rotary switch device is so timed in its movement that its radial arms are interposed in the path of the pilot shoes, as said shoes-are presented by the ad- 'jacent transfer disk. Each transfer device .fer disks to the left, and this switching of the carriers is accomplished by so timing the rotation of the switch devices that .the

"switch arms are interposed across the path of the guide shoes at the point where the pockets 17 intersect or overlap. The rotation of the switch devices moves the switch arms out of the paths of the guide shoes of Fig. 13, the pilot shoe of the carrier that is moving around the machine toward the left is engaged by the flange of the switch arm which is interposed in the path of said shoe. As the carrier disks and the carriers are moving at a much higher speed than the switch arm, it is manifest that the switch arm will serve as a guide to divert the pilot shoe into the next adjoining pocket 17 and maintain the pilot roller 57 thereof in engagement with the next adjacent transfer disk to the left. Fig. 14 illustrates the position of the parts slightly advanced over that shown in Fig. 13. It will be seen from this figure that the pilot shoe has been advanced beyond the switch arm which diverted it, and that said switch arm is advancing so that it will be out of the way of the approaching pilot shoe of the carrier which is moving around the machine to the right. It is also clear from Fig. 14 that one of the switch arms on the rotary switch de vice at the right is approaching a position to serve as a guide and diverting means for the pilot shoe of the carrier moving around the machine to the right, and that said switch arm will prevent the pilot shoe from following the transfer disk with which it is in engagement, and will divert it to the next transfer disk to the right and cause it to move therewith. In Fig. 14, the radial lines indicate the difference in speed of the transfer disk and the rotary switch device, the transfer disk moving through an arc of 60 while the rotary switch device moves through an arc of 20 This is desirable in order to secure the proper timing of the operations of these two rotary devices. The direction of movement of the carrier marked A is indicated by the large arrows marked a, and the direction of movement'of the carrier marked A is indicated by the large arrows a in Figs. 13 and 14.

It is manifest that by providing a rotary switch device, the machine may be operated at speeds very much higher than were found possible with machines of this type having reciprocating means for diverting the bobbin carriers from one transfer disk to the next transfer disk of the series.

In Fig. 17, the pilot shoes are indicated by dotted lines, and are shown as in engagement with the flanges of the switch arms. At the four points marked 00 the switch arms are shown in the positions which they occupy when they divert the carriers from one transfer disk to the next transfer disk, said switch arms being in position to cause the engaging pilot shoes to move clockwise ,with the transfer disks to which they are being switched. As the switch devices rotate, the switch arms are brought into such a position that the pilot shoes are brought into engagement with the proper switch arms to cause said pilot shoes to move in an anti-clockwise direction, so that the carriers move anti-clockwise while engaged with certain of the transfer disks, and anti-clockwise while engaged with other transfer disks, the path or orbit of one set of bobbin carriers crossing the path of the other series of bobbin carriers at the points where the transfer disks and rotary switch devices overlap. It must be kept in mind that the transfer disks travel at a higher speed than the rotary switch devices, and that, there-' fore, the pilot shoes will be moved along the flanges on the switch arms, said flanges forming relatively stationary guide walls for the pilot shoesat the points where the bobbin carriers are switched from one carrier disk to the next carrier disk of the series.

The thread is wound upon a spool 58 and said spool is adapted to fit snugly over a split, wooden sleeve which in turn fits the end of the stud 52, which projects above the plate 54. The inner sleeve 59 is formed at its lower end with a flange 60 provided with peripheral notches 61 adapted to receive upstanding pins 62 carried by a ratchet wheel 63 so that the sleeve carrying the bobbin will be locked to the ratchet wheel but may be readily lifted from the stud 52 and from engagement with the ratchet wheel.

Mounted rigidly on the plate 54 is a vertical post 64 formed with a vertical slot 65. In this slot is arranged to reciprocate vertically a bobbin-releasing slide- 66. On the slide 66 is mounted a roller 79; and on the upper end of the post 64 are mounted two 7 thread guides 80 and 81. On the post near the lower end thereof is pivoted avertically disposed throw-off bar 82 which is provided with two outwardly extending arms 83 and 84. On the arm 84 is mounted a thread guide 85. The lower end of the slide 66 is adapted to bear on the upper edge of the throw-off bar at one side of the pivot thereof and between the pivot and the hook 85,

as clearly shown in Fig. 24. The thread i from the bobbin is carried under the hook 85, then up over the hook 81, then down under the roller 79 and then up through the thread guide 80 at the top of the post 64.

When the tension on the braiding thread is sufiicient to draw the slide 66 to the upper end of its slot, the said slide will move means to release the ratchet wheel and permit the bobbin to rotate. A sprlng is connected to the slide to move it downwardly I to take up slack in the thread so that the slide will be moved up and down in the slot depending upon the amount of slack in the thread and the tension thereon and the movement of said slide will control the rotation of the bobbin. Should the thread break the slide drops down and engages the throwoff bar to place said bar in position to ope'rate the thread-break stop mechanism as will fully hereinafter appear. The means for controlling the rotation of the bobbin and the tension on the thread is fully described in the application filed b Frederick Klein on September 13, 1919, erial No. 323,487 and need not be more particularly described herein.

The main guide shoe 55 is provided with an upwardly extending pin 86, which enters a segmental slot 87 in the plate 49, said pin serving to limit the rotation of the shoe 55 on its pivot. The slot is of sufficient length to permit the shoe to have ample swinging movement, but insures it being properly presented to the raceways or guide channels in the base of the machine.

The drive pinion 20 is formed with a long hub 88, and the pinion, as hereinbefore stated, rotates freely on the drive shaft 21. Pinned to the drive shaft to rotate therewith is a collar 89, and connected to said collar or formed integral therewith is a spring-gripping coil 90. The free end of this coil is beveled, as shown at 91, in F ig. 10, and is adapted to enter a correspondingly beveled recess 92 in the drive pinion 20. Engaging the'beveled outer coil of the gripping member 90 is a ring 93, which is adapted to be engaged by a fork 94 of a clutch lever 95 pivoted at 96. Engaging the clutch lever and the side of the base frame 1 is a spring 97 which normally throws the clutch fork outwardly, and forces the beveled coil of the clutch member into engagement with the beveled recess 92 of the drive pinion. As the clutch coil rotates with the drive shaft and as the friction between the beveled part 91 of the clutch coil and the drive pinion is sufficient to cause the coil to wind up on the hub 88, it is manifest that the clutch coil will grip the hub of the drive pinion and cause it to turn with the drive shaft so long as the clutch fork is free to press the clutch coil into engagement with the drive pinion. To disconnect the-drive pinion from the drive shaft it is only necessary to release the clutch form, whereupon the clutch coil will expand, and by expanding withdraw the beveled coil from engagement with the guide pinion. The frictional grip between the clutch coil and the drivepinion need only be suflicient to cause the drive shaft to wind the clutch coil on the hub of the drive pinion, the frictional engagement between the clutch coil and the hub being the means for connecting the drive shaft to the pinion, and the frictional engagement between the clutch coil and the pinion being merely for the purpose of causing the drive shaft towind the clutch coil on the hub 88, As the clutch coil lSlWOllIld on the hub its tendency will be to elongate and to press the beveled coil into closer engagement with the drive pinion.

In order that the clutch may be manually operated for the purpose of starting or stopping the machine, the clutch lever is provided with a horizontal operating arm 98 having near its free end an upwardly and outwardly beveled operating lug 99. Mounted in the side wall of the casing 1 is a rock shaft 100 provided at its outer end with an operating crank 101. The rock shaft is provided w1th a laterally extending pin 102, which is adapted to engage the beveled lug 99 so that upon operating the starting handle 101, the said pin may be caused to bear on the beveled surface of the lug 99 and thereby swing the clutch lever to free the clutch from the driving pinion. Connected to the starting handle is a spring 103, which normally causes the pin 102 to engage the lug 99 and thereby hold the clutch out of operation, the spring 103 being stronger than the spring 97. In order to lock the starting handle and the rock shaft 100 in position to free the clutch lever a locking lever 104 is pivoted on the top of the base 1, said locking lever being provided with a locking lug 105 adapted to engage the end of an arm 106 secured rigidly to the rock shaft 100. The locking lever 104 is provided above the top of the base 1 with a releasing finger 107, said finger being pressed upwardly by a spring 108, so that normally it will engage under and lock the arm 106 in position to free the pin 102 from the clutch arm 98, thereby permitting the spring 97 to force the clutch into operating position. By releasing the lockin lever from the arm 106 the spring 103 w ll rotate the rock shaft and move the pin 102 out of engagement with the lug 99. In order to start the machine it is only necessary to raise the handle 101 until the arm 106 is locked in position by the locking lever 104. To stop the machine it is only necessary to depress the operating finger 107, thereby releasing the arm 106 from the'locking lever 104.

To provide means for automatically stopping the machine, should one of the braiding threads break, the upper end of the locking lever 104 above the base is provided with a horizontal cross-head 109 having laterally extending operating arms 110 and 111.' As shown in Fig. 2, these operating arms are in the path of the outwardly extending arms 83 and 84 of the throw-off bar 82 of the carriers. When either of the operating arms is engaged by one of the arms of the throw-off bar, the locking lever is rocked outwardly and the latch lug 105 freedfroin the arm 106. When the throwoif bar is in the position shown in Fig.24 both of the arms 83 and 84 are directly in the plane of the cross-head 109, so that one of the arms 110 or 111 will be engagedby either arm 83 or 84 of one of the throw-off bars, as indicated in, dotted lines in Figs. 20, 21 and 22. The locking lever 104, as shown in Fig. 2, is located at a point between two adjacent carrier disks, so that the operating arms 110 and 111 may be engaged by the throw-off bar of a carrier moving with either one of said adjacent carrier disks. Whenever there is a tension on the braiding thread the throw-off bar is moved on its pivot to swing the arm 84 above the cross-head 109 and the arm 83 below the cross-head, so that they will pass the operating arms 110 and 111 without engaging them. Should an undue slack develop in the braiding thread, or should the braiding thread break, the operating arm will drop down to its normal position and the slide 66 will engage it and insure its moving-into its operative position, as shown in Fig. 24, in which position, as hereinbefor'e stated, both of the arms 83 and 84 are in the plane of the cross-head 109, and will operate the stopping means as soon as they reach it.

To provide a ready method ofassembling and disassembling the parts of the machine, one of the transfer disks is split radially and the two halves are detachably connected to the rotor shaft by means of a clamp washer 112 and. a nut 113. By removing this split transfer disk from its shaft the carriers may be removed and then the other parts of the machine readily disassembled.

It is desirable in machines of this type to provide means for manually and slowly operating the machine. To accomplish this a short stub shaft 114 is mounted in a tubular horizontal bearing in the base of the machine, a small pinion 115 being mounted on the inner end thereof, said pinion meshing with the main drive beveled gear 19, said gear and shaft rotating at all times with said gear 19. An operating crank 116 is loosely mounted in the bearing of the shaft 114. The said crank is rigidly connected to a rotatable clutch member 117, which is adapted to be brought into engagement with a cooperating clutch member secured to the outer end of the shaft 114. By forcing theclutch member 117 inwardly to bring it into engagement with the clutch member on the end of the shaft 114, the gear 115 may be rotated and the machine thereby manually operated. The clutch members are of such construction that they will separate, and the member 117 will be forced outwardly through the rotation of the beveled pinion 115. By this means the operating handle 116 will remain idle'and disconnected from the rotating mechanism, except when it is manually forced inwardly to bring the clutch members into engagement.

The lower wooden disk 49 of the carrier is adapted to bear on the upper surfact of the reduce their momentum. It

top 2 of the base, and to thereby support the carriers in their operative position. The wooden disks," being suitably lubricated, move over the top of the disk with little or no friction and without noise. The carriers are made as light as possible, in order to is manifest that in a high-speed machine it is essential that the carriers be made as light as possible.

By arranging the pilot shoes as shown in the drawing and described herein, they will be in advance of the guide shoes in the direction of travel of the carriers around the machine. By this means the carriers will be maintained in their proper position with respect to the center of the machine, and will be prevented from rotating on the axes of the guide shoes. This is essential in order to maintain all of the parts of the carriers in their proper operative position, and in order that the throw-off bars shall be presented properly to the automatic stop mechanism.

Each of the rotor shafts is provided with a spiral groove 118. The lower end of these shafts run in oil, and the said grooves will serve as means for I delivering the oil throughout the length of the shaft, so that said shafts will be constantly and thoroughly lubricated. The vertical shaft 33 is also provided with a similar groove 118 and for the same purpose.

What we claim is:

1. A braidiinig machine comprising a series of rotor shafts, a transfer disk on each of said shafts and rotating therewith, means for rotating adjacent rotor shafts in opposite directions, a rotatable switch device, means for rotating the switch device, a series of spool carriers, a pilot shoe, and a guide shoe mounted on each of said carriers, the pilot shoes being adapted to be engaged by the switch devices to divert said carriers from one transfer disk to the next adjacent transfer disk.

2. A braiding machine comprising a series of rotor shafts, a transfer disk on each of said shafts and rotating therewith, means for rotating adjacent rotor shafts in opposite directions, a rotatable switch device, means for rotating the switch device, a

series of spool carriers, a. pilot. shoe, and

a guide shoe mounted on each of said carriers, the pilot shoes being adapted to be engaged by the switch devices to divert said carriers from one transfer disk to the next adjacent transfer disk, the pilot shoes being arranged in advance of the guide shoe in the direction of travel of the carrier.

3. A braiding machine comprising a base serving as a support forthe operating mechanism and as an oil chamber, an annularv series of circular pockets formed in the top of said base, said pockets overlapping and intersecting each other, a vertical rotor shaft mounted in the base at the center of each of said pockets, a transfer disk on the upper end of each of said shafts above the base, operating gears rigidly connected to the shafts and intermeshing to drive adjacent shafts in opposite directions, a swltch device connected to each of said rotor shafts and lying within said pockets, each of said switch devices being formed with radial arms having upstanding flanges at their outer ends, a guide disk loosely mounted on each of said rotor shafts between the transfer disks and the switch devices, operating gears connected to each of the switch devices and intermeshing to drive the switch devices in the same direction as the associated transfer disks but at a slower speed, a series of carriers mounted on the base and provided with a central stud adapted to be engaged by the transfer disks, a pilot shoe carried by each of said carriers and adapted to be engaged by the switch devices, a pilot roller mounted on the carrier and adapted to be engaged by the transfer disks, the pilot shoe and the pilot roller being located in advance of the central stud in the direction of movement of the carrier, and a guide shoe mounted on the central stud of the carrier and adapted to engage the walls of the circular pockets and the periphery of the guide disk.

4. A braiding machine comprising a series of rotor shafts, a transfer disk on each of said shafts, means for rotating adjacent rotor shafts in opposite directions, a rotatable switch device associated with each rotor shaft, means for rotating the switch devices in the same direction as its associated transfer disk but independently thereof, a series of spool carriers, a guide shoe pivotally mounted on the carrier, and a pilot shoe pivotally mounted on the carrier in advance of the guide shoe in the direction of travel of the carrier, said pilot shoe being below theguide shoe and being adapted to r be engaged by the switch devices.

5. braiding machine comprising a base serving as a support for the operating mechanism and as an oil chamber, an annular series of circular pockets formed in the top of said base, said pockets overlapping and intersecting each other, a vertical rotor shaft mounted in the base at the center of each of said pockets, a transfer disk on each of said shafts above the base, gears connected to the shafts to drive adjacent shafts in opposite directions, a switch device on each of said rotor shafts and lying within said pockets, each of said switch devices being formed with radial arms having upstanding flanges at their outer ends, a guide disk rotatably mounted on each of said 'rotor shafts between the transfer disks and the switch devices, operating gears connected to each of the switch devices and. intermeshing to drive the switch devices in the same direction as the associated transfer disks, a series of carriers each provided with a central stud adapted to be engaged by the transfer disks, a pilot shoe carried by each of said carriers and adapted to be engaged by the'switch devices, a pilot roller mounted on the carrier and adapted to be engaged by the transfer disks, the pilot shoe and the pilot roller being located in advance of the central stud in the direction of movement of the" carrier, a pivoted guide shoe mounted on the central stud of the carrier and adapted to engage the walls of the circular pockets and the periphery of the guide disk.

6. braiding machine comprising a base, a series of vertical rotor shafts mounted in the base, a transfer disk on each of said shafts, gears connected to said shafts to drive adjacent shafts in opposite directions, a series of carriers each provided with a central stud adapted to be engaged in cooperating notches in adjacent transfer disks, a pilot roller mounted on each of the carriers and adapted to be engaged in cooperating notches 1n adjacent transfer disks, the pilot roller being located in advance of the central stud in the direction of movement of 'thecarrier, and means mounted on the rotorradial arms having upstanding flanges lying adjacent the walls of said pockets, a guide disk loosely mounted on each rotor shaft between the switch device and the transfer disks, gears connected to each switch device, a series of carriers each provided with a central stud adapted to be engaged by the transfer disks, a pilot shoe mounted on each carrier and formed with a reduced part to be engaged by the flanges on the switch arms and with a larger part to engage the guide disks and the walls of the pockets, a pilot roller mounted on the carrier and adapted to be engaged by the transfer disks, a guide shoe mounted on the carrier and adapted to engage the guide disks and the walls of the pockets.

8. A braiding machine comprising a base,.

into each other, a series of carriers adapted to be moved about the machine by the transfer disks, a rotary switch device mounted mounted on the rotor shafts, and means for rotating the switches at a slower speed than,

the transfer devices.

9. A braiding machine comprising a base, an annular series of vertical rotor shafts mounted in said base, a transfer disk on the upper end of each of said shafts, operating gears connected to said shafts and meshing into each other, aseries of carriers adapted to be moved about the machine 'by the transfer disks, a rotary switch device mounted upon each rotor shaft, each of said switch devices being formed with six radial switch arms arranged equal distances apart around the switch and each of said switch arms being formed with an upwardly extending operating flange at its outer end, operating gears connected to said rotary switches and meshing into each other, the said rotary switches and their operating gears being rotatably mounted on the rotor shafts, and means for rotating the switches at a slower speed than the transferdevices.

This specification signed this tenth day of September, A. D. 1919.

' MABIUS E. PENSO.

FREDERICK KLEIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2880642 *Feb 9, 1956Apr 7, 1959Western Electric CoCore covering apparatus
US3363502 *Apr 14, 1967Jan 16, 1968Textile Machine WorksBraiding apparatus with means for guiding and propelling strand carriers
US3408894 *Oct 2, 1967Nov 5, 1968Textile Machine WorksBraiding apparatus
US3748952 *Jul 23, 1970Jul 31, 1973Petzetakis Aristovoulos GeorgeBraiding machine
US3783736 *Aug 14, 1972Jan 8, 1974Richardson DBraiding machine
US3866512 *Jan 18, 1973Feb 18, 1975August Heroz MaschinenfabrikApparatus for braiding knotless netting
US5370031 *Apr 15, 1993Dec 6, 1994United States Surgical CorporationBraider apparatus with improved bobbin holder
US5383387 *Jun 4, 1993Jan 24, 1995United States Surgical CorporationApparatus and method for producing braided suture products
US5520084 *Jan 13, 1995May 28, 1996United States Surgical CorporationApparatus and method for producing braided suture products
Classifications
U.S. Classification87/32, 87/55, 87/38
International ClassificationD04C3/40, D04C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD04C3/30, D04C3/40
European ClassificationD04C3/40, D04C3/30