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Publication numberUS1361763 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 7, 1920
Filing dateJun 8, 1920
Priority dateJun 8, 1920
Publication numberUS 1361763 A, US 1361763A, US-A-1361763, US1361763 A, US1361763A
InventorsJohn Hamil
Original AssigneeJohn Hamil
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of surfacing
US 1361763 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. HAMIL. METHOD OF SURFACING. APPLICATION FILED JUNE 8,1920

Patented Dec. 7, 1920.

WITNESSES A TTOR/VEYS UNITED STATES.

JOHN HAMIL, or NEW YORK, N. Y.

METHOD OF SURFACING.

' Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Dec. 7, 1920.

Application filed June 8, 1920. Serial No. 387,305.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, JOHN HAMIL, a citizen of the United States, and resident of the city of New York, borough of Manhattan, county and State of New York, have invented a new and Improved Method of Surfacing, 'of which the following is a full, clear,'and exact description.

My invention relates to surfacing, and more particularly thatplass of surfacing by means of which a stucco wall is produced, which shall have an exterior appearance extremely pleasing to the eye, and odd in design.

It is well understood that numerous attempts have beenmade with a view of producing a wall surface (either exterior or interior) in the face of which vari-colored fragments of material different from that which forms the body of the wall appear upon the surface of the same to produce a pleasing effect.

The foreign matter aforementioned, usually includes different colored glass, the fragments of which serve to relieve the 'IIlOIlOton of a flat wall of the stucco type.

l Ieretofore this effect has been produced by usually la ing the fragments upon the base of a mold andi'n subsequently introducing other ingredients into the moldxto produce a block haviii fragments in its exterior face. These e cots are crystalized in patents such as that to Marsh #312,221, F ederici #527,416 andnumerous others.

It has been impractical, however, heretofore to apply a. surfacing directly to a lath construction or other anchoring agent serving to retain the stucco in applied position in which surfacingthe particles of foreign matter would appear upon the face of the stucco. The attempts above noted all include block construction, which is necessarily far more expensive than applying stucco.

With this in view, I have now invented a method of surfacing by means of/ which a stucco finish having foreign particles in its exterior surface may be applied to the anchoring agent or wall so that an odd design and effect pleasing to the eye is produced.

Reference is had to the attached sheet of drawings which illustrate one ractical embodiment of my invention, an in which Figure 1 is a front view of'a section of stucco wall constructed in accordance with my invention.

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken along the lines 2-2 of Fig. l, and

Fig. 3 is a similar section showing the surfacing in process of being finished.

In providing the surfacing contemplated, the conventional scratch surface is first prepared, which scratch surface maybe anchored by any suitable means to the wall. An ordinary stucco mixture is now provided, it being noted, however, that contrary to the conventional procedure that any desirable number of vari-colored foreign fragments, such as glass are incorporated in this mixture. y

The stucco mixture is now applied to the scratch surface in the conventional manner, presenting in appearance a conventional stucco wall. After the mixture'is permitted to dry for approximately six to twelve hours, so that the same becomes semi-plastic, a trowel is utilized edgewise, so that the edge of the same engages, as has been clearly illustrated in Fig. 3, the edges of the glass fragments, thus serving to turn the same and to bring them to the surface.

The surfacing is now allowed to stand, subsequent to which a steel brush or other suitable agent may be used for cleansing the dust and small film from the surface of the foreign particles, which cleansing is conveniently followed up by preparing a mixture of any suitable ingredients such as five to one muriatic acid, so that the particles may present a high finish, and which mixture is applied to the surface of the glass fragments whereby to thoroughly cleanse thesame and cause them to stand in bold relief against the conventional stucco ground.

7 It will be seen, referring now to the views, that the reference numeral 5 indicates the conventional stucco mixture with which the foreign particles, such as glass fragments 6 and pebbles are intermixed.

Subsequent to the application'of this mixture to the scratch surface, the fragments will lie in the manner shown in Fig. 3, but upon a trowel 8 being utilized in the manner also indicated in this figure, the fragments will be turned to lie, as has been indicated in Figs. 1 and 2.

The subsequent cleansing process resorted to will cause an enhancing of the brilliancy of the particles or fragments so that the same will stand in relief, as has been shown in Fig. 1.

Obviously numerous modifications of the method of application might readily be resorted to without in the least departing from the scope of my claims, which-read as follows Having thus-described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is as follows 1. A method of producing surfacing in which foreign particles adapted to be brought to the face of the finished surfacing are mixed with the conventional plastic mixture, and applied directly to the surface tobe covered. y

2. A method of producing surfacing in which foreign particles are mixed with the conventional plastic mixture, and applied directly to the surface to be covered, and

permitting the mixture to dry to a semiplastic condition subsequent to which the particles are brought to the surface of the same.

3. A method of producing surfacing in which foreign particles are mixed with the conventional plastic mixture and applied directly to the surface to be covered, and permitting the mixture to dry to a semiplastic condition subsequent to which the particles are brought to the surface of the same by means of manipulating an edged tool over the surface of the mixture and engaging the edges of the fragments whereby to bring the same to the surface.

4. A method of producing surfacing in v which foreign particles are mixed with-the conventional plastic mixture and applied directly to the surface to be covered, and permitting the mixture to dry to a semiplastic condition subsequent to which the particles are brought to the surface of the same by means of manipulating an edged tool over the surface of the mixture and at an angle to the same, and engaging the edges. of the fragments whereby to bring the same to the surface.

5. A method of producing surfacing in which foreign particles are mixed with the conventional plastic mixture and applied directly to the surface to be covered, and

-permi'tting the mixture to dry to a semiplastic condition subsequent to which the particles are brought to the surface of the same and subsequent to which the surface of the particles are cleansed.

6. A method of producing surfacing in which vari-colored glass fragmentsare introduced into the conventional plastic mixture applied directly to the surface to be covered, and in permitting the mixture to dry to a semi-plastic condition, an edge tool being passed in intimate contact over the surface of the mixture while in this condition, whereby to turn the fragments, and to bring the same to the surface.

JOHN HAMIL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2964486 *Jun 24, 1957Dec 13, 1960Bernier Napoleon MCoating composition
US2993849 *Apr 17, 1958Jul 25, 1961Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoMethod for treating cover members for electrolytic cells
US5339589 *Feb 12, 1993Aug 23, 1994Thrower John HAggregate floor and method for forming same
US6610224Jan 28, 2002Aug 26, 2003Sullivan Concrete TexturesProcesses for producing monolithic architectural cementitious structures having decorative aggregate-containing cementitious surfaces
US7504129Mar 16, 2005Mar 17, 2009Ra Golv AbMethod of producing a flooring and a flooring produced according to the method
US20040035329 *Aug 19, 2003Feb 26, 2004Sullivan Francis W.Compositions for producing architectural cementitious structures having decorative aggregate-containing cementitious surfaces and processes therefor
US20060207213 *Mar 16, 2005Sep 21, 2006Ra Golv AbA method of producing a flooring and a flooring produced according to the method
US20080202045 *Apr 23, 2008Aug 28, 2008Ra Golv Abmethod of producing a flooring and a flooring produced according to the method
EP1460201A1 *Mar 3, 2004Sep 22, 2004RA Industrigolv ABA method of producing a flooring and a flooring producted according to the method
Classifications
U.S. Classification264/108, 264/246, 52/315, 404/81
International ClassificationB44C1/00, B44C1/20
Cooperative ClassificationB44C1/20
European ClassificationB44C1/20