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Publication numberUS1363561 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 28, 1920
Filing dateApr 12, 1917
Priority dateApr 12, 1917
Publication numberUS 1363561 A, US 1363561A, US-A-1363561, US1363561 A, US1363561A
InventorsFrank A Browne
Original AssigneeBarber Asphalt Paving Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mixing apparatus
US 1363561 A
Images(4)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. A. BROWNE.

MIXING APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 12, 1917.

1,363,561., memea Dec. 28,1920.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 1.'

F. A. BROWNE. MIXING APPARATUS. APPLICATION FILED APR. I2, I91].

Patented Dec 28, 1920..

4 SHEETS-SHEET 2.

F. A. BROWNE. MIXING APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED APR-12,191]- 1 $63,561 I Patented Dec. 28, 1920.

4 SHEETS-SHEET 3.

F[G H 9 lwwwtom 9 fi'miadfimww, Witweeeeo Z] 3 tr p M6 F. A. BROWNE.

MIXING APPARATUS.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 12. 1917.

Patented Dec. 28., 1920.

4 SHEETSSHEET 4.

FRANK A. BROWNE, F BUFFALO, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO THE BARBER ASPHALT PAVING- COMPANY, OF PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA, A CORPORATION OF WEST VIRGINIA.

MING APPARATUS.

naeaeei. Y

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Dec. 28, 19250..

Application filed April 12, 1917. Serial No. 161,538.

and useful Improvements in Mixing Apparatus, whereof the following is a specification, reference being had to the accompanymgr drawlngs.

he invention relates to mixing devices, adapted for mixing bituminous compounds, such as are used for pavements, paving blocks andthe like.

It is an object of the invention to provide an apparatus for mixing bituminous compounds in which every particle of the material being mixed is moved in as many different directions as possible, and comes into contact with the greatest number of other particles of the material being mixed at the Q time. i

Ian

A further object of the invention is to provide a mixing apparatus so arranged that it tends to force all the particles of material to travel toward the center of the machine during the process of mixing, but to travel only a short distance at a time, and to move in directions which are at right angles to one another.

A still further object of the invention is to prevent large masses of material from collecting and to break up any such masses which do collect.

With these and other objects in view I provide a cylindrical drum, which is horizontally mounted and adapted to rotate about its longitudinal axis. On the interior surface of this drum I provide a number of loafiie plates or flights, which are located at an angle to one another, but which do not come mto contact with one another. The bafie plates at each end of the drum are oppositely inclined to those at the other end, which causes the material to travel longitudinally toward the center of the drum. These baflie plates are inclined at a slight an le to the interior surface of'the drum, an mounted at a slight distance therefrom, so that an interspace is formed between the baflie plates and the drum. I also provide a plurality of radial cross bars extending across the interior of the drum. These carry a plurality of horizontal bars extending longitudinally the length of the drum and positioned at a point half way between the surface of the drum and the longitudinal axis thereof. The location of the cross bars and longitudinal bars is such that they tend to change the direction of travel of particles moving toward the center of the drum, and also to break up any lumps or masses of material which may be formed. In the accompanying drawings, Figure I, 1s a longitudinal sectional view through a inlxer, conveniently embodying my inven- Fig. II, is an end elevation as seen from the right of Fig. I.

Fig. III, is a cross sectional elevation of I the same viewed in the direction of the arrows III, III, in Fig. I.

Fig. IV, illustrates the appearance of the inner surface of the mixer when developed.

upon a plane.

In the embodiment shown in the drawlngs, the apparatus consists generally in a drum 1, horizontally and rotatably mounted in an enveloping furnace 7, over a fire box 8. Drum 1, is cylindrical in form and provided at each end with a circular track 2, adapted to engage rollers 3, supported on bearings 5. This mounting permits rotation of the entire drum, which is accomplished through toothed annular ring 4, fixed on one end of drum 1, which engages suitable driving mechanism.

7 Drum 1, is preferably formed of sheet metal closed at its ends by heads 12, and 13. Head 12, is provided with a suitable aperture 1 1, centrally located for the reception of the end of a chute 15, by means of which the material is fed to the interior of the drum 1. Head 13, is provided with a simk lar central aperture 16, through which at;- cess may be had to the interior of the drum. This aperture, however, is normally closed by door 17, adapted to slide in suitable guides 18 and secured by hasp 19. Head 13, is also provided with outlet aperture 20, located near the periphery of the drum and from which the material may be withdrawn at the end of the mixing. This aperture is closed by door 21, suitably hinged at 22, and during the mixing held closed by catch 23.

' In order to accomplish the thorough mixing of the material, I rovide a number of -batlie plates or flights 2 which are mounted on the interior surface of the drum. The arrangement of these plates is best shown 1n Fig. TV, from which ft nan be seen that the too.

plates, the edge which is opposed to the periphery of the cylinder, is inclined so that although one end of the plate is held by its clip with its edge at a distance from the interior surface of the drum, the other end reaches into contact with said surface, as

,seen more particularly in Fig. III. Plates 27, are alsoinclined at a slight angle to the radii of the cylinder forming drum 1, drawn to the points of attachment of the plates.

This inclination is produced by the inclination of clips 28, as best shown in Fig. III. It will be noted upon examinationof Fig. IV, that the baffle plates 27 are arranged in sets, one set consisting of a plurality (say two or three or more) plates, occupying the particular region of the periphery and having all the plates of the set substantially parallel and inclined similarly to the axis of the drum, while adjacent sets are inclined at a different angle. It will also be observed that notwithstanding this arrangement of the sets the combined action of all of the baffle plates is at all times to tend to throw. the material toward-the center of the drum. As drum 1, rotates, the material tends to travel toward the center of the drum.. Some of the material, however, sticks to the surface of the drum and passes under plates 27; other portions slide along the surface of plates 27, dropping off therefrom when the plates reach their inverted position. The material which drops off these plates is diverted in its downward movement by angle irons 26, which extend longitudinally throughout the drum Angle irons 26, are attached at intervals to radial cross bars 25; which are mounted in pairs throughout drum 1, being placed at right angles to one another as shown inFigs. I and III. These angle irons are also mounted at points approximately half way from the axis of drum 1, to the surface thereof. Consequently, the

greater portion of the material dropping off plates 27, comes into contact with one of bars 26, and is deflected to the sides, instead of falling straight down. This deflecting function is also performed somewhat bv cross bars 25l Their main function is, however,

"i to interfere with the longitudinal travel of the material throughout the drum, deflecting portions against plates 27 and to break up large 1umps,'suc'h as tend to accumulate in certain stages of the mixing operation. The cross bars 25 are the better enabled to perform this latter function of deflecting the material against thebaffle plates 27 by reason of their being located in the interspaces or intervals between said baffles 27 in the path of the material traveling against the periphery of the drum under impulsion of gravity and of said baflies.

As the material is rotated and mixed within the drum, it is heated by furnace 7, which surrounds the drum and has a fire box 8, he'- neath the drum and a flue 9, above the drum,-

so that the heated products of combustion pass entirely around the drum before escaping. Fire box 8, is preferably provided at one end with an aperture 10, for the reception of an oil burner not shown, and the requisite air for the support of the combustion is admitted through port 11.

The operation of the apparatus will be obvious from the foregoing description. The

material is admitted throu h opening 14, and drum 1, is rotated agitating the contents, which are heated by furnace 7. As a result of my arrangement of battle plates and cross bars there is no clogging of the material within the drum and the individual particles of material are.constantly in motion, but in widely different directions. As the drum rotates a large part of the material Having thus described my invention, I

claim 1. In a mixing apparatus, the combination of a cylindrical drum mounted to rotate about its longitudinal axis; and means within the drum for causing the material to be mixed to travel varying courses during rotation thereof, said means including a plurality ofbaflle plates attached to the inner surface of the drum by clips and having their edges adjacent said inner surface inclined with reference thereto, so that at one end they are-spaced therefrom, while at the other end they are in contact therewith.

2. In mixing apparatus, the combination of a cylindrical drum mounted to rotate about its longitudinal axis; and means Within the drum for causingthe material to be mixed to travel varying. courses during rotation thereof, comprisinga plurality of inclined bafiie plates mounted in sets upon the 3. In a mixing apparatus for bituminous paving material, the combination of a cylindrical drum mounted to rotate about its longitudinal axis; means mounted upon the inner surface of the drum comprising a multiplicity of elements whereby the material to be mixed iscaused to travel varying courses during the rotation thereof; and cross bars in the interior of the drum extending from one side of the drum to the other in the intervals between elements of said first-mentioned means, so as to break up and deflect the material traveling against the inner surface of the drum, as well as that falling inward therefrom.

4. In mixing apparatus, the combination of a cylindrical drum mounted to rotate about its longitudinal axisyinclined baflie plates mounted upon the inner surface of the drum whereby thematerial to be mixed is caused to travel longitudinally therein; radial crossbars arranged in pairs throughout the drum in the interspaces between said inclined bafiie plates, so as to break up larger lumps of material during their longitudinal travel; and angle irons'mounted upon said cross bars parallel to the longitudinal axis of the drum, so that material dropping from the baffle plates is deflected to the sides by said angle irons instead of falling straight down. r

5. In mixing apparatus, the combination of a cylindrical drum mounted to rotate about its longitudinal axis; means mounted upon the inner surface of the drum for causing the material to be mixed to travel varying courses during rotation thereof; a

plurality of cross bars mounted within the drum; and a plurality of longitudinal bars carried by the cross bars substantially midway between the longitudinal axis of the drum and the periphery thereof.

6. In a mixing apparatus for bituminous paving material, the combination of a cylindrum, the bars of each pair crossing substantially at the longitudinal axis of the drum; and longitudinal irons mounted on said cross bars parallel with the axis of the drum; so that the mass of material in the drum is constantly broken up, forced toward the center of the drum, and driven away therefrom axially of the drum by the accumulating pressure of material moving toward the center of the drum in the region of its periphery. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto signed my name, at Buifalo, Erie 00., N. Y., this 7th day of April 1917.

FRANK A. BROWNE. Witnesses:

JOHN J. GIFroRn, JOHN RINDFLEISCH.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4095284 *Dec 27, 1976Jun 13, 1978Mendenhall Robert LamarDirect heating asphalt-aggregate recycle apparatus and method
US5033863 *Nov 27, 1990Jul 23, 1991Cedarapids, Inc.Method and arrangement of a flight attachment
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/57
International ClassificationE01C19/10
Cooperative ClassificationE01C19/1027
European ClassificationE01C19/10D4