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Publication numberUS1365731 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 18, 1921
Filing dateFeb 10, 1920
Priority dateFeb 10, 1920
Publication numberUS 1365731 A, US 1365731A, US-A-1365731, US1365731 A, US1365731A
InventorsSchloss Joseph W
Original AssigneeSchloss Joseph W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Weighting for garments
US 1365731 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. w. SCHLOSS.

WEIGHTING FOR GARMENTS.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 10. 1920.

1,365.731. Patented Jan. 18.1921.

WITNESS-1 I INVENTOR.

A T TORNE Y.

. UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

WEIGHTING FOR GARMEN TS.

To all whom it may concern.

Be it known that I, .IosnrH WV. SoHLoss, a citizen of the United States, residing at the city of New York, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Weightings tor Garments, of which the fo l lowing is a full, clear, and exact description.

This invention relates to weighting for garments, an article which usually consists of a strip or envelop of: textile material containing or having incorporated in it pieces of lead or other weighty material regularly spaced, the strip as a whole being adapted to be sewed or applied to the lower edge of garments to make them hang properly. The methods heretofore used for making this weighting have been expensive and some of them produced rough edges upon the metal pieces which cut through the fabric in which they were incased. The object of my invention is to provide a process of making this weighting which shall be essentially cheaper than the processes heretofore used and in which the article itself will be of a superior quality. In all previous processes of making this material the metallic pieces have been individually produced in the form of disks, bars, or beads and afterward introduced into the textile envelop during the process of making the latter. Contrary to such processes my invention consists in using a continuous strip of metal to which the textile covering or envelop is applied and thereafter the metal strip is fractured or divided into short lengths without destroying or affecting the continuity of the envelop. The resulting product affords all the flexi bility and the facility of applying it to the garment which has accompanied the use of the heretofore well known product.

My improved process will be described in detail in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which-- Figure 1 indicates two different forms of a blank metal strip which is used in making up the product;

Fig. 2 shows the same two strips after undergoing the first step of the process;

Fig. 3 illustrates one of the forms of Fig. 2 after the textile covering or envelop has been applied thereto;

Fig. 4 illustrates the external appearance of the finished article, and

Fig. 5 is a section of the finished article.

In carrying out the process I produce in Specification of Letters Patent.

Application filed February 10, 1920.

Patented Jan. 18, 1921. Serial No. 357,625.

any desired manner a strip of lead or other suitable material, preferably flat, or ribbonlike, shown at a. in Fig. 1. This strip is then provided at regular short intervals through-- out its length with weakened places fOFliIGd in. any suitable way as by notches a cut into the edges of the strip at opposite points to produce narrow, thin necks 7). These notches, or WllittlBVQl configuration may be given the strip to produce the weakness described, may be formed by cutting dies or may be cast in the strip when originally made, the special mode of producing the weakening not being important to the invention. hen the weakened strip, as seen in Fig. 2,.has been made, it is introduced into an ordinary braiding machine wherein it is covered or enveloped progressively by a tight-fitting tubular braid which may be of cotton, wool, silk, or other suitable miiterial. The braided fabric is desirable for this purpose because its strands are laid on the bias causing the vfabric to yield longitudinally when stretched. IV hen the article comes from the braiding machine it has the ap-' pearance shown generall in Fig. 3, the braid being somewhat loose opposite the necks Zr because unsupported, but fitting tightly elsewhere. To complete the product the covered strip is subjected to longitudinal strain or a stretching, during which operation the loose portions of the braid opposite the necks in the metal yield and extend so that the strain is largely applied. to the weakened necks F) of the metal, which eventually yield and break, thus dividing the metal strip up into a series oi? small metal pieces 0 which are then held in proper rela .tion to each other by the flexible braided cover d the tension upon which has caused it to draw inward between the adjacent pieces of metal. The stretching of the strip in order to fracture the lead without affecting the continuity of the covering may be accomplished by passing the strip through two sets of rolls the second of which runs at slightly greater speed than the first, thus producing a strain on the run between the two sets of rollers. But this may even be accoinplished by hand by subjecting the strip either to a sudden or a gradual tension.

The second view in each of Figs. 1 and 2 shows a metal strip of round cross section, like a wire, the weakened places in which may be formed by annular grooves or by notches. The weakening notches or grooves may be readily fashioned to avoid the production of burs or rough places upon the metal and it will be seen that such roughness as may be produced by the fracturing of the metal at the necks will be confined within the loose portion of the covering where there will be no tendency to cut through the latter. The stretched and reduced portions of the cover lying between the pieces of metal. afiord the necessary flexibility to the strip and convenient places through which to pass the securing stitching.

I claim:

1. The method of making garment weight ing which consists in applying a flexible continuous covering to a continuous metal strip and then dividing the metal strip into short lengths without affecting the continuity of the covering.

2. The method of making garment weighting which consists in applying a continuous textile covering to a continuous metal strip having weakened places at intervals along its length and then fracturing the metal strip at its weakened points without affecting the continuity of the covering.

3. The method of making garment weighting which consists in applying a continuous textile covering to a continuous metal strip having weakened places at intervals along its length and then applying longitudinal tension to the covered strip until the metal strip is fractured at its weakened points.

4. The method of making garment weighting which consists in applying a continuous flexible extensible covering to a continuous metallic strip having a reduced crosssection at spaced intervals along its length and then stretching the covered strip until the internal metal strip is fractured at its reduced places.

5. The method of making garment weighting which consists in applying a braided co\'- ering to a continuous metallic strip having reduced cross-section at spaced intervals along its length and then stretching the corered strip until the metal strip is fractured at its reduced places.

In witness whereof I hereunto subscribe my signature.

JOSEPH \V. SGHLOSS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2931046 *Nov 18, 1955Apr 5, 1960Klein Herbert DCap visor reinforcement
US5625897 *Jan 11, 1996May 6, 1997Park; Kelly R.Upper torso garment
US7900277 *Jul 30, 2007Mar 8, 2011Her Look Enterprises LLCWeighted slip
US8024819 *Feb 28, 2008Sep 27, 2011Elizabeth GearhartWeighted undergarment
US20120210488 *Feb 20, 2012Aug 23, 2012Under Armour, Inc.Athletic Arm Warmer
WO2004049843A1 *Oct 29, 2003Jun 17, 2004Kimberly Clark CoSurgical gown having a fluid collection gutter
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/273
International ClassificationA41F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41F17/00
European ClassificationA41F17/00