Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1368215 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 8, 1921
Filing dateAug 21, 1920
Priority dateAug 21, 1920
Publication numberUS 1368215 A, US 1368215A, US-A-1368215, US1368215 A, US1368215A
InventorsFrank H Stewart
Original AssigneeFrank H Stewart
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Woven fabric
US 1368215 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

F. H. STEWART.

WOVEN FABRIC.

APPLICATION FILED AUG.2I, 1920.

1,368,215. Patented Feb. 8,1921.

2 SHEETS-SHEET I.

FRANK H. STEWART, 0F ELKINS PARK, PENNSYLVANIA.

WOVEN FABRIC.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Fatented Feb. 8, 1921.

Application filed August 21, 1920. Serial No. 405,121.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, FRANK H. STEWART, a citizen of the United States, residing in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, have invented certain Improvements in Woven Fabrics, of which the following is a specification.

My invention relates to woven fabrics and has as its object the production of a fabric which will possess all the advantages of a woven fabric cut on the bias but will not be possessed of any of the disadvantages thereof. This object I accomplish by weaving a fabric in which the wefts are transverse of the length of the fabric and the warps are reversely diagonal. That is to say, each warp, in addition to traversing the fabric from end to end, traverses it progressively to and fro from side to side, so that at any given point in the length of the fabric, one half of the warps will be traversing not only forwardly but toward one edge of the fabric while the other half of the warps will be traversing not only forwardly but toward the other edge of the fabric. Such a fabric 4 not only is susceptible of the diagonal distortion which is the outstanding feature of a piece of fabric cut on the bias, but being properly selvaged in the weaving, will not pull or fray at the edges.

In the accompanying drawing Figure 1 is a face view, on an exaggerated scale and of a diagrammatic nature, of a piece of fabric woven in accordance with my invention, and

Figs. 2 to 5, inclusive, are diagrammatic face views illustrating a succession of heddle adjustment during the weaving of the fabric illustrated in Fig. 1.

The fabric illustrated comprises eighteen warp threads which are numbered, respec tively, 1 to 18. With these warps are interwoven wefts which are preferably, though not necessarily, formed from a continuous weft forming thread 19 which passes, in a to-and-fro run through each of the successive sheds of the warps. In the fabric illus trated, the nine warp threads traversing from left to right each crdss, transversely, one of the nine warp threads traversing from right to left, between each pair of to-and-fro runs of the weft forming thread 19, and between the to-and-fro runs of each pair of the same the warp threads are shedded without change in their previous lateral relation.

The weft forming thread 19 will, as it passes from one to-and-fro run to the next,

form a selvage, as illustrated at the right hand edge of the upper halfof the fabric shown in Fig. 1, but, if desired, this edge may be strengthened and rendered neater by the provision of a longitudinal selvage warp thread 20, as illustrated at the right hand edge of the lower half of the fabric shown in said figure. The provision or omission of this selvage warp thread 20 is entirely optional and in no way affects the essential feature of my invention.

The outer ends of each to-and-fro run of the weft forming thread 19 are united by a loop 21 and these loops may, if desired, be engaged by any suitably arranged loop locking thread or threads, for the purpose of preventing them being drawn back into the body of the fabric. In the fabric illustrated the loops are shown as engaged and retained by a pair of longitudinally disposed twisted loop locking threads 22 arranged as shown and described in my United States Letters Patent No. 1,324,627, dated December 9, 1919. This arrangement, however, is also optional.

In Figs. 2 to 5 inclusive, are shown four of the successive heddle adjustments during the weaving of the fabric shown in Fig. 1. Each of the warp threads 1 to 18 is controlled by one of corresponding heddles 1 to 18, and these heddles are slidably mounted upon upper and lower controlling bars 23 and 24. When in a certain position, as shown in Figs. 2 and 4, the ends of these controlling bars are alined with the ends of a pair of semi-circular guide bars 25 and 26 upon which the heddles may also slide.

In operation, the bars 23 and 24 will be moved away from one another, as shown in Fig. 2, whereupon a shed will be formed by the warp threads, the warp threads 1 to 9 controlled, respectively, by the heddles 1 to 9 forming the lower member of the shed and the warp threads 10 to 18 controlled, respectively, by the heddles 10 to 18 forming the upper member of the shed. A to-and-fro run or weft forming thread is inserted in this shed after which the next shed is formed by moving the bars 23 and 24 toward one another to the position shown in Fig. 3, whereupon the warp threads 1 to 8 will be carried by the heddles 1 to 8 to form the upper member of the shed and the warp threads 10 to 18 will be carried by the heddles 10 to 18 to form the lower member of the shed. A

to-and-fro run of weft forming thread is inserted in this shed, and the next shed is then formed by moving the bars 23 and 24 away from one another and positioning the heddles thereupon as shown in Fig. 4. To accomplish this each of the heddles 2 to 9 is moved on the bar 24 one step to the right while the heddle l is moved from the'bar 24 over the semi-circular guide bar 25 to the right hand end of the bar 23, and, at the same time, each of the heddles 11 to 18' is moved on the bar 23 one step to the left while the heddle 10 is moved from the bar 23 over the semi-circular guide bar 24 to the left hand end of the bar 24. With the heddles in this position a to-and-fro run of weft forming thread is inserted in the shed and the next shed is formed by moving the bars 23 and 24 toward one another to the position shown in Fig. 5. A to-and-fro run of weft forming thread is inserted in this shed and the next shed is formed by another repositioning of heddles similar to that already described. In this repositioning the-heddle 2 is moved up from the bar 24 to the bar .23 and the heddle 11 is moved down from the v bar 23 to the bar 24 and the remaining hedsuccession of to-and-fro runs of a continuous thread my invention is not limited in this manner, and even though the to-and-fro run is adhered to, a plurality of weft-forming threads may be employed, their runs being inserted, in serial order, from either or both edges of the fabric. Such modifications, being obvious, require no special illustration.

The primary feature of my invention resides in the reversely diagonally disposed warp threads with transverse 'wefts interwoven therewith, the other attendant and cooperating features shown and described being subordinate.

I claim:

1. A Woven fabric comprising reversely diagonal warp threads and a continuous weft forming thread passing to and fro in suc-.

cessive-sheds of the warp-threads to form wefts.

2. A woven fabric comprising a set ofreversely diagonal warp threads, a longitudinal selvage warp thread flanking the same,

and a continuous weft forming thread passing to-and-fro in successivesheds of the diagonal Warp threads to form wefts and being looped about said selvage warp'thread between adjacent to-and-fro runs.

:3. A woven fabric comprising a set of reversely diagonal Warp threads, a continuous weft forming thread passing to andfro in successive sheds of the warp threads to form Wefts and having loops at the ends of the to-and-fro runs, and longitudinally disposed loop locking threads flanking said set of warp threads and engaging and retaining said loops.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification.

' FRANK H. STEWART.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3000404 *Mar 5, 1959Sep 19, 1961Bridgeport Fabrics IncNarrow fabric
US3426804 *Dec 20, 1966Feb 11, 1969Product & Process Dev AssociatHigh speed bias weaving and braiding
US3446251 *Apr 23, 1968May 27, 1969Gen ElectricTriaxial fabric
US3799209 *Apr 19, 1972Mar 26, 1974Doweave IncMachine for forming triaxial fabrics
US3874422 *Mar 13, 1974Apr 1, 1975Doweave IncTriaxially woven fabrics of uniform compliancy and porosity
US3965939 *Jul 18, 1975Jun 29, 1976Karol KulczyckiHeddle with guide means thereon for use in a weaving machine for making triaxial fabrics
US3985159 *Oct 7, 1975Oct 12, 1976Barber-Colman CompanyHeddle transfer apparatus and method for triaxial weaving machine
US3985160 *May 30, 1975Oct 12, 1976Barber-Colman CompanyHeddle for a weaving machine for making triaxial fabrics
US4013103 *Aug 11, 1975Mar 22, 1977Barber-Colman CompanyTriaxial weaving machine with heddle transfer and method
US4031922 *Mar 25, 1976Jun 28, 1977Barber-Colman CompanyVertically arranged triaxial weaving machine
US4046173 *May 17, 1976Sep 6, 1977Barber-Colman CompanyTriaxial weaving machine with heddle shedding means
US4130142 *Dec 9, 1977Dec 19, 1978Dayco CorporationLoop picker
US6431222 *Nov 3, 2000Aug 13, 2002Biteam AbNetwork-like woven 3D fabric material
US6494235Mar 22, 2000Dec 17, 2002Hexcel Fabrics (Societe Anonyme)Bias-bound fabric, method for making same and weaving machine for continuously making such a fabric
US8375996 *Oct 30, 2009Feb 19, 2013Vestas Wind Systems A/SMethod and an apparatus for producing a multiaxial fabric
US8443706Sep 7, 2011May 21, 2013E I Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyTriaxial braid fabric architectures for improved soft body armor ballistic impact performance
US20110209795 *Oct 30, 2009Sep 1, 2011Vestas Wind Systems A/Smethod and an apparatus for producing a multiaxial fabric
US20140083553 *Jan 20, 2012Mar 27, 2014Tape Weaving Sweden AbMethod and means for producing textile materials comprising tape in two oblique orientations
DE2319822A1 *Apr 18, 1973Oct 25, 1973Doweave IncMaschine zur herstellung von triaxialgewebe
DE2624011A1 *May 28, 1976Dec 9, 1976Barber Colman CoLitze fuer eine webmaschine zur herstellung triaxialer gewebe
DE2635060A1 *Aug 4, 1976Mar 10, 1977Barber Colman CoTriaxiale webmaschine mit einer vorrichtung zum umsetzen der litzen
DE2758100A1 *Dec 24, 1977Jun 28, 1979Pfrommer Jun BrunoTextile web mfg. machine - has carrier(s) provided with cam operated pivotal levers having warp yarn guiding eyelets and cam controlled weft yarn guide member
WO2000056965A1 *Mar 22, 2000Sep 28, 2000Hexcel FabricsBias-bound fabric, method for making same and weaving machine for continuously making such a fabric
WO2013036751A2Sep 7, 2012Mar 14, 2013E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyTriaxial braid fabric architectures for improved soft body armor ballistic impact performance
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/419, 139/DIG.100
International ClassificationD03D13/00
Cooperative ClassificationD03D13/00, Y10S139/01
European ClassificationD03D13/00