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Publication numberUS1368835 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 15, 1921
Filing dateJul 25, 1919
Priority dateJul 25, 1919
Publication numberUS 1368835 A, US 1368835A, US-A-1368835, US1368835 A, US1368835A
InventorsPlace Charles H
Original AssigneeNew York Mackintosh Clothing C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Raincoat
US 1368835 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. H. PLACE.

RAINCOAT.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 25.1919. I 1,368,835., Patented Feb. 15, 1921.

Z SHEETS-SHEET I.

C. H. PLACE.

'RAINCOAT.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 25.1919.

Patented Feb. 15, 1921.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 2 I: ATTORNEY INVENTOR Kala/245s an as nears! erasures FWQE.

OHABLES H. PLACE, OF NEW ROCHELLE, NEW YORK, ASSIGNOR TO NEW YORK MACKINTOSHOLOTHING 00., OF NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK.

RAIN'COAT.

Specification of Letters Patent. Patentedl eb. 15', 11921.

Application filed July 25, 1919. Serial No. 313,185.

To allwhomz'tmay cometa- Be it known that I, CHARLES H. PLACE,

a citizen of the United States, and a resident The coat of my mvention. comprises,

among other features, a body-portion, a

skirt-portion devoid of side or back seams,

sleeves secured to said body-portion, an over-jacket or cape, a collar-band secured upon the upper edges of said body-portion and jacket and a collar secured to said collar-band and capable of being rolled half up and used as a storm-collar while at the same time lapping over and concealing the lower seam of'the collar-band. The skirt is connected with the body-portion by a transverse seam which is beneath and protected by the jacket, and the sleeves are secured to said body-portion by seams which over and at the sides of the shoulders are beneath and protected by the said jacket.

By limiting the number ofseams in the 9 coat and protecting these seams as far as possible beneath the jacket and collar, the

- coat is rendered waterproof, the seams being concealed, and considerable expenseis avoided by the lack of necessity of specially prepared water-proof seams such as are required when the seams are exposed to rain.

The garment will, of course, be made of water-proof fabric.

The invention will be fully understoodfrom the detailed description hereinafter. presented, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 presents a perspective view, partly broken away of a rain-coat embodymg my invention, t e same being shown on a gure;

Fig. 2 is a back view, partly broken away, of the same;

Fig. 3 is a front view of the upper portion of the same, the collar being shown as rolled half up and fastened and when in this positlon serving as a storm-collar;

Fig. 4 is a central vertical transverse section, on a larger scale, through the coat taken on the dotted line H of Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a vertical section through a portion of the coat taken at right angles to the sectlon of Fig. 4 and on the dotted line 55 of Fig. 4.-;

Fig. 6 is a vertical'section through an upper portion of the coat taken on the dotted 11ne 6-6 ofFig. 2, and

Fig. 7 is a vertical section through a medial portion of the coat taken on the dotted line 77 of Fig. 5.

In the drawings, 10 designates the bodyportion of the coat, '11 the skirt-portion thereof, 12 the sleeves, 13 the over-jacket or cape, 14 the collar-band and 15 the collar.

The body-portion 10 is reasonably snugfitting and has arm-holes in which the upper ends of the sleeves 12 are secured by seams 16 (Fig. 5) which extend over the top and down along the sides of the shoulders and under the arms, said seams pur- "posely being rather hi hup on the shoulders. At its front the Ody-portionv 10 has overlapping vertical portions of usual character adapted to be secured together by buttons and button-holes or snap-fasteners in a well-known manner, and at its back said body-portion is preferably provided with holes 17 for purposes of ventilation. The

body 10 has seams over the top of the shoul ders, as at 100 (Fig. 4), and these seams are concealed under the jacket 13. The body 10 has no seams in the back, nor below the sleeves 12. i

The skirt 11 forms a dependin continuation of the 'body 10, as shown in ig. 4, and at its upper edge said skirt is secured to said body by a horizontal seam 18 of any suitable character.

A distinguishing feature. of the skirt 11 is that it is in one continuous piece and therefore devoid of back and side seams.

At the front. of the skirt 11 the vertical edge portions of the fabric thereof are folded under and sewed down in a customary manner by lines of stitching, and the front edge portions of the skirt 11 overlap and are provided with buttons and button-holes 21, 22 respectively and near the. lower end of the skirt with a snap-fastener 23 for use when occasion requires. A desirable feature of the construction of the front of the skirt is that the outer overlapping part having the seams or stitching 20 extends over the seams or lines of stitching 19 in the underlapping part, with the stitching lines 19, 20 out of register with each other (Fig. 1) whereby the danger of Water entering through said lines is greatly lessened, as compared with a garment having the lines 19, 20 in register. The skirt 11 is therefore devoid of side and back seams and the lines of stitching in its underlapping front part are covered over by solid portions of the overlapping front part. The seam 18 at the upper end of the skirt 11 is protected from rain, as hereinafter explained.

The collar-band 14 is of two-ply having inturned upper and lower edges, as shown in Fig. 6, and between said upper edges I sew the upper edge of the collar 15, as at 24, while between said lower edges I sew the upper edge of the body 10 and also the upper edge of the jacket 13, as at 25. The collar 15 always extends over the seam 25, and said collar is of such adequate extent that it may be folded or rolled half up to create a storm collar, as I show in Fig. 3, the outer lapels of the collar then being secured together at the neck bya snap-fastener 26. When the collar 15 is folded to create a storm-collar both seams 24, 25 are protected from rain. The collar 15 is of two-ply and the lower edges of these plies are turned in and the then four thicknesses of the fabric are sewed to ether, as at 27 (Fig. 6).

he jacket 13 fits upon the body 10 with reasonable snugness, and it is formed with arm-holes 28 for the sleeves 12 and out of one piece of material, said jacket being devoid of back and top shoulder seams. The jacket 13 has short side seams below the arm-holes 28 to the bottom. edge of the jacket, but these seams are protected beneath the sleeves 12. I indicate at 101 the short side seams in the jacket 13 below the armholes. The jacket 13 has a length suflicient for it to conceal the aforesaid seam 18 and thus protect said seam from the effects of rain. The shoulder portions of the jacket 13 are seamless and extend out ,beyond the sleeve seams 16, as shown in Fig. 5, and thus protect said seams and also the seams 100 from rain. At its front the jacket has vertical over and underlapping portions to be fastened together by buttons and button holes 29, 30, respectively.

What Iclaim as m invention and desire to secure byLetters l atent, is:

1. A raincoat comprising a body having sleeves sewed thereto and overlapping front portions provided with fastening means, a skirt portion in one continuous piece both vertically and transversely considered and therefore devoid of vertical seams and said skirt portion being sewed at its upper edge to said body and having overlapping front portions registering with the overlapping front portions of said body and provided with fastening means, and an over-jacket sewed to said body and provided with armopenings for said sleeves and bein extended below the upper edge of said s 'rt portion and thereby protecting the seam connecting said body and skirt portion.

2. A raincoat comprising a body having sleeves sewed thereto, a skirt portion in one continuous piece sewed at its upper edge to said body and an over-jacket having a seamless back and shoulder portions, said overjacket extendin below the seam connecting said body and s irt portion and at its shoulder portions extending over the upper seams of said body.

3. A raincoat comprising a body having sleeves, a skirt portion sewed at its upper edge thereto, an over-jacket having a seamless back and shoulder portions and provided with arm-openings for said sleeves, a collar-band seamed at its lower edges to said body and jacket and a collar seamed to the upper edge of said collar-band, said 001- lar being adapted to be rolled about half up to create a storm-collar and to cover in that condition the seam at the lower edge with buttons and buttonholes and reinforced by the vertical front portions of the fabric of said body being folded under and sewed down, the vertical lines of stitching in the overlapping front portions of said skirt being'out of register, and an over-jacket secured at the neck to said body and provided with arm-openings for said sleeves and extending below the seam which connects said body and skirt portion together.

5. A raincoatcomprising a body having sleeves sewed thereto and overlapping front portions provided with fastening means, a skirt-portion sewed at its upper edge to said body and an over-jacket having seamless back and shoulder portions and overlapping 5 front portions provided with buttons and button-holes, said over-jacket extending be-v low the seam connecting said body and skirtportion and at its shoulder ortions extending over the upper seams 0 said body, and

said over-jacket having openings through 10 which said sleeves extend.

Signed at New York city, in the county of New York and State of New York, this 23rd day of July, A. D. 1919.

' CHARLES H. PLACE. Witnesses:

ARTHUR MARION, Giants. 0. GILL.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2441746 *Apr 24, 1945May 18, 1948Egon BernathRaincoat construction
US2442749 *Mar 15, 1946Jun 8, 1948Archer Rubber CompanyLady's raincoat
US2448449 *Oct 3, 1946Aug 31, 1948Masland C H & SonsCoat
US2461390 *Apr 24, 1947Feb 8, 1949Priest Montague EstherUmbrella pocket and umbrella
US2952022 *Jan 18, 1956Sep 13, 1960Louis BlauerWaterproof body protecting garment
US4315334 *Nov 13, 1979Feb 16, 1982Wally PearsallDual purpose coat
US4351066 *Mar 11, 1980Sep 28, 1982Wally PearsallDual purpose jacket
US4408356 *Dec 14, 1981Oct 11, 1983Simon AbramsVentilated rain garment
US4712252 *Apr 22, 1987Dec 15, 1987Chou Hsii CAnti-wind raincoats
Classifications
U.S. Classification2/85, 2/115, 2/87
International ClassificationA41D27/28, A41D27/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41D27/28
European ClassificationA41D27/28