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Publication numberUS1371339 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 15, 1921
Filing dateJan 6, 1920
Priority dateJan 6, 1920
Publication numberUS 1371339 A, US 1371339A, US-A-1371339, US1371339 A, US1371339A
InventorsBonnie Walters, Lew Arntz
Original AssigneeBonnie Walters, Lew Arntz
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Detachable shoe-heel pad
US 1371339 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. ARNTZ AND WALTERS.

DETACHABLE SHOE HEEL PAD APPLICATION FILED JAN. 6, 1920- I 1,371,339, Patented Mar. 15,1921.

JEaZ/ UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

LEW ABN'I'Z AND BONNIE WALTERS, OF MOINES, IOWA.

DETACHABLE SHOE-HEEL PAD.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Mar. 15, 1921.

Application filed January 6, 1920. Serial No. 349,823.

the pad on the heel in such manner that the pad can not accidentally be removed.

With these and other objects in view, our invention consists in the construction, arrangement and combination of the various parts of the device, whereby the objects contemplated are attained, as hereinafter more fully set forth, pointed out in our claims, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 shows a vertical, sectional view throu h a heel and pad and fastening means embodying our invention.

Fig. 2 shows a similar view showing the pad removed.

Fig. 3 shows a top or lan view of the pad illustrated in Figs. 1 an 2.

Fig. 4 shows a view similar to that shown in Fig. 1, of a form in which our invention may be. embodied.

Fig. 5 shows an inverted plan view of the plate on the bottom of the heel, illustrated in Fig. 4; and

Fig. 6 shows a side elevation of a shoe equipped with a removable pad embodying our invention.

It is well-known that especially in the case of womens shoes, having comparatively slender heels, the heels wear off quickly and require frequent and expensive repairs. It is to provide a pad, which can be put on the heel by the user, that we have devised our present device. I

In the accompanying drawings, we have used the reference numeral 10 to indicate generally the heel of a shoe 11. Fastened to the bottom of the heel 10 by means of ='scr ews 12 or othersuitablemeans, is a metal plate 13, which is preferably provided: at

its periphery with upwardly and downwardly extending short flanges 14: and 15.

The plate 13 is also formed with suitable openings 16 to receive the pins hereinafter referred to. The heel 10 is provided with openings 17 to register'with the openings 16. The heel 10 is provided in the central por tion of its under surface with a recess 18, and the plate 13 in the form of our invention shown in Figs.- 1 and 2, is provided with a boss or thickened portion 19, which may be as shown, on the lower side of the plate 13.

The plate 13 and boss 19'are provided with a screw threaded opening 20. We provide a shoe heel pad 21, preferably of leather and of suitable size and shape, which is relatively thin, and has on its upper surface a convex-concave metal plate 22, having its concave surface upward, which plate is secured to the pad 21 by screws 23.

The plate -22 has upwardly projecting pins 24 designed to enter the holes 16 and 17 for holding the plate 22 against any rotary movement, when it is assembled on the heel 10.

In the plate 22 is an opening 25 to receive a screw bolt 27. The pad 21 is provided with an opening 28 of larger diameter than the ogening 25, to receive the head of the bolt 2 In Fig. 4 we have shown the slightly modified form of our invention, in which the heel 10 is provided with a plate 13, similar to the plate 13, with the exception that the plate 13 has a boss 19 on its upper surface. In the form of the invention shown in Fig. 4, the pad 21 has a plate 22 on its upper surface, similar to the plate 22, excepting that the plate 22 has a screwthreaded boss or the like 26 on its upper surface, through which the screw-threaded bolt 27 may pass. The under surfaceof the plate 13 is shown in Fig. 5.

in position with the edges of the plate 22 The shape of the plate 22 and the thick? 7 ness of the boss 19 are such that when the plates 13 and 22 are placed together, the boss 19 does not touch the center of the plate 22. As the parts are drawn together;

by the screw-bolt 27, the central portion of the plate 22 is sprung for snugly drawingit toward the boss 19 for forcing the edges ofthe plate 22 outwardly into snug'engagement with the flange 15. The pins 24 enter the openings 16 and 17. with suflicient play to permit the edges of the plate 22 to be pressed against the flange 15.

Similarly when the form of invention shown in Fig. 4 is used, the plate 2:2 is placed adjacent to the plate 13 with the pins 2-1 extended into the openings 17 and the screw-threaded bolt 27 is screwed into the plate 22" until it'reaches and enters the openings 20. It" is then screwed into the openings of both plates and will finally draw the plates tightly together, until'the boss 26 is drawn against or almost against the plate 13 and the edges of the plate 29f engage thefiangel5.

"It will be noted that in the form of the invention shown in Fig. 4,-the boss 26 on the upper surface of the platelizl is threaded, while the plate 13 itself is not. threaded.

While it will be readily seen that our invention may be embodied in a structure having a great variety of differences in details, there are certain important features of our device to which we desire to especially call attention.

There should be a plate secured to the hot- I' tom of theshoe heel, which plate furnishes a proper bearing and gripping member for the screw-bolt 27 or its equivalent, and also furnishes a means for holding the pins 24: or their equivalents in position for preventing any twisting of one of the plates with relation to the other. i I

This plate on the shoe heel also furnishes a protection in the form of the flange 15 for the edge of the plate on the upper sur face of the heel pad. 1 V

There must also be the heel'padhaving on its upper surface a plate." One of. the

plates must be concavo-convex,"with its concave face adjacent to the other plate. 'We

' have shown the padhaving on its upper surface the concave-convex platewith its concave surface up,so that when the center of the plate on the heel pad is drawntoward the heel of the shoe by the action of the screw-bolt 27, the outer edge of the plate of the pad will engage the flange 15 of the shoe heel and when these parts are fastened concavo-convex form,--as illustrated, the bolt 27 may be employed to spring the central portion of the arch" formed by the plate on the heel pad, so as to form what may be called a circular brace held under tension,

which provides a spring lock for the bolt.

It may be mentioned in this connection that the-central portion of the heel pad plate is shaped after the surface of a sphere so that the curvature in all directions running from the central'opening inthe heel pad plate is the same.

It will readily be seen'that many chan es in details of structure may be made'inour evice, which may be embodied in our invention, and it is our intention to cover by our claims any changesin structure which may be reasonably included within their scope.

We claim as our invention: 1. In a device of the class described, the combination of a shoe having a heel, with a plat'e'on' said heel secured thereto,fhava peripheral downwardly extending flange, a pad having a concave-convex plate secured to its upper surface, and means for gripping said plates together for {holding t e lower plate under tension. i

2.- In a device of the class described, the combination of a shoe having a heel, with a plate on said heel secured thereto, having a peripheral downwardly extending flange, a pad having a concavo-convex plate secured to itsup'per surface, and means for gripping said plates together for holding the lower plate under tension, one of said plates having openings,'and the other. having pins adapted to enter said openings.

8. In a device of the class described, the combination of a shoe having a heel, with a plate secured to said heel, a pad, a plate se cured to said pad,one ofsaid plates being concave-convex, and means for grlppln'g said plates together for holding the concavo convex plate underyieldink tension.

4. In a device of the cla'ss'described, the

combination of a shoe having a. heel, with a metal plate secured to said heel, 'apad, a 'concavo-convez'cfplat'e securedto said pad,

hole.

other. having a: pin a ranged. to enter said i 5. In a device of the class described, the holes and pins, and a screw device adapted combination of a shoe having a heel, a plate for locking said plates together with the secured to the bottom of said heel, havlower late under tension. 10 ing upwardly and downwardly extending Des oines, Iowa, November 22, 1919.

5 flanges at its edges, a paid, a concavo-convex plate on the upper surface of said pad se- LEW ARNTZ. cured thereto, said plates having coacting BONNIE WALTERS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3351967 *Feb 7, 1964Nov 14, 1967Dardig Ben VHeel construction
US3782010 *Oct 2, 1970Jan 1, 1974Frattallone MDetachable heel for shoes
US5560126 *Aug 17, 1994Oct 1, 1996Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5806210 *Oct 12, 1995Sep 15, 1998Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US5826352 *Sep 30, 1996Oct 27, 1998Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5918384 *Sep 30, 1996Jul 6, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US5970628 *Sep 8, 1998Oct 26, 1999Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6050002 *May 18, 1999Apr 18, 2000Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6195916Feb 25, 2000Mar 6, 2001Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6324772Aug 17, 2000Dec 4, 2001Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6604300Dec 4, 2001Aug 12, 2003Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US6662471Oct 18, 1999Dec 16, 2003Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US6962009Jun 30, 2004Nov 8, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Bottom surface configuration for athletic shoe
US6966129Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Cushioning for athletic shoe
US6966130Jun 30, 2004Nov 22, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Plate for athletic shoe
US6968635Jun 30, 2004Nov 29, 2005Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe bottom
US6996923Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbing athletic shoe
US6996924Jun 30, 2004Feb 14, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Rear sole structure for athletic shoe
US7040040Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Midsole for athletic shoe
US7040041Jun 30, 2004May 9, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with plate
US7043857Jun 30, 2004May 16, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe having cushioning
US7069671Jun 30, 2004Jul 4, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Arch bridge for athletic shoe
US7076892Jun 30, 2004Jul 18, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Shock absorbent athletic shoe
US7082700Aug 3, 2005Aug 1, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration
US7089689Aug 3, 2005Aug 15, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with inclined wall configuration and non-ground-engaging member
US7114269May 28, 2003Oct 3, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved sole
US7127835Dec 11, 2003Oct 31, 2006Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with improved heel structure
US7155843Aug 3, 2005Jan 2, 2007Akeva, L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7380350Jun 30, 2004Jun 3, 2008Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with bottom opening
US7536809Dec 28, 2006May 26, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Athletic shoe with visible arch bridge
US7540099Jun 30, 2004Jun 2, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Heel support for athletic shoe
US7596888Dec 12, 2008Oct 6, 2009Akeva L.L.C.Shoe with flexible plate
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/42
International ClassificationA43B21/38, A43B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/38
European ClassificationA43B21/38