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Publication numberUS1372354 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 22, 1921
Filing dateJan 20, 1919
Priority dateJan 20, 1919
Publication numberUS 1372354 A, US 1372354A, US-A-1372354, US1372354 A, US1372354A
InventorsKeeran Charles R
Original AssigneeAutopoint Pencil Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pencil
US 1372354 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. R. KEERAN.

PENCIL. APPLICATION FILED 1AN.20, 1919.

Patented Mar. 22, 1921.

Ill

. the

NIED STATES v PA 'ENT OFFICE.

GHARLES R. KEERAN, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNOR, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS,

TO AUTOPOIN'I PENCIL COMPANY, OF ILLINOIS.

To all whom it may concern.

Be it known that I, CHARLES R. KEERAN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chlcago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Pencils, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to a pencil equipped with propelling mechanism interiorly o f 1ts body, and operable by means exterlorly thereof, for advancing into operative position a lead at one end, and an eraser at the other.

The general construction of the present pencil is similar to the ones disclosed in my pending applications, Serial Nos. 213,241 and 220,415. In many respects, however, this invention represents a distinct improve ment over my previous constructions, par ticularly as to details of manufacture and assembling. It is to be understood, therefore, that the pencil herein described embodies-many of the features claimed in my co-pending applications aforesaid, as well as certain other improvements which are hereinafter described and claimed.

In the accompanying'drawing which illustrates, in preferred form, the features of thls invention-- Figure 1 is a longitudinal section through pencil; Fig. 2 is an enlarged sectlonal v1ew ofits upper end, taken longitudinally on line 2-2 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 3 is a similar view, partly 1n elevation, taken on line 33 of Fig. 5;

Figs. 4, 5, and 6 are transverse sections taken, respectively, on lines 4-4, 55, and

6*6, of Fig. 2 i

Fig. 7 is an enlarged sectional v1ew of the lower end of the pencil; and

Fig. 8 is a detail showing a modificat on of the eraser plate and plunger end WhlCh cooperates therewith.

In the use of the terms upper and lower, it should beunderstood that reference is being made to the pencil as it is pointed in usethatis, witht-he eraser end up, and the writing end down. r

The body of the pencil may be made of metal, wood, or any other material suitable for the purpose. Many of the present imfprovements are especially adapted to penoils utilizing wood, fiber, or other appropri- Specification of Letters Patent. Patented M 22 Application filed January 20, 1919. Serial No. 272,054.

of the pencil, but without rotation.

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF PENCIL.

- ate substance, for the making or a relatively solid body, as distinguished from tubular bodles which are generally made of metal. As illustrative of a preferred construction, the body 10 may be regarded as made of wood, fiber, or some analogous material, and

I have shown therein a central bore adapted to receive a tube 11 extending for the major port1on ofthe body, within which tube the propelling mechanism is located. At its lower extremity, the tube is'reduced as at 12 so as to enter within a tip 13 to which it is secured by any convenient means.- A bore is formed within the tip which near its extremity is constricted as at 14 to provide a passage of proper size to frictionally engage the lead being used in the pencil. At its upper end the tip is flanged as at 15 in the form of a ferrule, thereby adapting it for connection to the lower end of the body 10. It will be observed that the sides of the tip and ferrule are tapered in conformity with the tapered lower end of the'pencil, which is also recessed suitably to receive the ferrule in flush relation therewith, this being. the preferred construction so as to present a neat and smooth appearance.

The tube 11 which is arranged centrally within the pencil body is non-rotatably secured as by a friction fit at 15 or otherwise. Flutings 16 are formed in the. tube throu hout'its lower portion, terminating by pre erence just short of the shoulder formed by the reduction of its lower end in forming the extremity 12. At both their upper and lower ends these flutings merge into the body of the tube in such a manner as to present beveled or rounded surfaces, and these fiutings serve to guide a plunger 17 centrally within the tube, and to receive between them a finlS projecting laterall from the plunger, so that the plunger may reely move longitudin ai lilly e beveled or rounded ends of these flutings facilitate entrance of the plunger and fin into correct operative position. When the the lower ends of the flutings, the plunger in this position is free to rotate within the tube.

By an operation tobe hereinafter described,

the plunger together with its fin may be removed from this lowermost position within the pencil preliminary to the insertion of a new lead therein.

As already stated the tube' 11 is immovably arranged with the pencil body. The combnied tip and ferrule which is secured to the lower end of the tube acts to hold the parts in correct position relative to each other at that end. At its other end I secure the'tube to the body by means of a cap 19 which is placed over the upperend of the body with its sides offset as shown to provide an upper part that is exteriorly threaded to receive in flush relation with the body a collar 20. The lower portion 21 of the sides of the cap by preference lies flush with the collar, and with' the body as well, which is suitably recessed for this purpose. The upper side of the cap is centrally apertured to reecive the upper extremity of the tube 11 whose end may be conveniently upset or hammered down, as at 22, to lock with the cap. Through the medium of the ferrule at the lower end and the cap at the other, it will. be observed that the cured against movement within the body.

The present pencil is characterized by one feature of importance which is novel, so far as I am aware, in a pencil having a solid body; that is, a body formed of wood, fiber, or other material suitable for producing a non-shell-like structure-this belng a magazine for reserve leads. To embody this in the present pencil I have arranged in the body a number of slots 23 extending downwardly from the upper end thereof as far as desired-preferably to a point near the lower end, so as to provide spaces each of suificient length to receive two leads, end to end. In the drawing these slots are represented as four in number, and are cut in radial fashion from the central opening that receives the tube 11. When the tube is fitted into the pencil, these slots are closed on all four sides, as viewed in cross section (see Fig. 6). Access to the chambers of the magazine is provided through holes 24 formed in the top of the cap, each hole being in register with one slot, so as to allow a lead to pass in or out, as required. The collar 20, together with its associated parts, acts normally to preventloss of these reserve leads in case the pencilfshould be inverted.

In arranging the threaded connection between the collar and the cap, it is important that these parts should not be permitted to turn together. To prevent this, the cap is locked against rotation relative to the'pencil body inthe following manner: Slits 25 a're arranged in the upper end of the body in line with grooves formed in the lower portion 21 of the cap (see Fig. 5), and keys 26 having an appropriate ofi'-set, as shown in Fig. 3, and extending from the tube 11 radially into the grooves 21, are then inserted, so as to lock the cap against rotation relative to the body. In practice the formation and assembly of the parts in this manner may be very expeditiously accomplished, and on this account this construction possesses special advantages.

Referring again to the collar 20 which is threaded to the cap 19, it will be noted that I have inturned its upper end to provide a flange 27 which affords on its upper surface a bearing for a sleeve 28 which acts as a retainer for an eraser 29. The sleeve is inturned at its upper end to provide a flange 30 which grips the eraser, and is formed interiorly with threads 31 which by preference are square-cut in cross'section, as shown in Fig. 2. At its lower end this sleeve 28 is formed with a wall that abuts the bearing surface on the collar 20, and with a boss 32 arranged to receive the upper end of a sleeve 33 to which it is made fast. The sleeve 33 extends into the tube 11 and is internally threaded to cooperate with the plunger 17 therein so as to impart longitudinal movements thereto whenever rotation is effected through the medium of the eraser sleeve 28. A flanged ring 34 is arranged beneath the upper end of the collar 20, and may be convenientlyheld in place by upsetting, as .at 35, the lower end of the boss 32. The effect of the collar, eraser sleeve, and ring, all

formed and related as described, is to provide a simple assembly which is readily attachable as a unit to the upper end of the pencil, and which maintains connection with the sleeve 33 therein by which the lead propelling -mechanism is actuated. These parts-the collar and eraser sleeve-constitute what may be termed the head of the pencil, and, with the sleeve 33 together with the plunger 17 therein, may be freely removed from the pencil body wherever refilling is required.

A threaded plate 36 is arranged within the eraser sleeve, as shown in Fig. 2. It

'will be noted that the threaded connection between these parts is relatively loose, and to accomplish this the threads are preferably straight cut, so that the plate may have a slight play longitudinally of the pencil. The upper side of this plate is slotted as at 37, and lies in abutting relation to the eraser so as to force it outwardly whenever the plate is turned relative to the eraser sleeve 28. On its under side the plate is provided with a hollow boss 38 interiorly threaded to receive the upper end of the plunger 17 whenever it is retracted a suflicient distance for this purpose. When the plunger is threaded into the boss, rotation of the parts may continue but with the plate locked nonrotatably with the plunger, so that both of these parts move upwardly to force out the eraser. This rotative movement, of course, should be continued only so far as necessary to advance the eraser to the distance desired,

'for the register of the plunger and boss threads. If pressure he applied to the end of the eraser for obtaining an excess of friction between the threads of the plate and eraser sleeve over the friction obtaining between the threads of the plunger and of the boss, and the eraser sleeve be then rotated to propel the plunger downwardly, this latter element will disengage itself freely from the boss so as to leave the plate in advanced position to properly support the eraser.

The plate and proximate end of-the plunger may be formed otherwise than in the manner described, as will be apparent by reference to Fig. 8, wherein these two parts, detached from the associated mechanism, are shown in detail. In this construction, the plate, designated as 39, is provided on its under side with a socket- 40 which is shaped other than round, and the proximate end 41 of the plunger to which the numeral 42 is applied is formed in a manner to cooperate therewith. In all other respects these parts may be constructed and operated as already described. In the form shown in Fig. 8, the plunger end when retracted sufficiently will enter the socket 40 and lock therewithinso as to cause the plate 39 to revolve with it, by which action the eraser is outwardly propelled. This alternative construction shown in Fig. 8 is typical of several that might be resorted to where it is not desired to use a threaded connection such as is shown in Fig. 2.

In use, the head, together with the sleeve 33 and plunger 17, are removed from the pencil whenever new leads are required' After inserting a lead of proper length into the upper end of the tube. the parts are replaced so as to become operative for propelling the lead. It will be noted that the lead inserted into the tube will tend to drop through to the lower end of the pencil where it is held by frictionwithin the tip 14;. In replacing the head 'upon the pencil, the plunger should, of course. be directed into the tube, after which the fin 18 is automatically guided into one of the longitudinal slots therein formed between two of the adjacent fiutings 16. By rotating the head,

the plunger may be advanced to propel the lead: when advanced to its limit, the plunw ger fin is free to rotate in the clearance beyond the flutings. This action is desirable in that it affords an indication of condi tions internally of the pencil, and is very much preferable to the usual construction in which the parts bind when their limit of movement has been reached. To retract the plunger agaln, the head may be removed from the pencil, this operation giving access to the magazine and enabling the user to refill at the same time.

I claim:

1. A pencil having a body within which is a tube containing lead propelling mechanism, means for holding the tube against longitudinal movement within the body comprising a member fitted to each end of V the tube and disposed in engaging relation with the adjacent portions of the body, the member at the upper end of the tube being formed with threads to receive thereon a threaded element, there being means for preventing rotation of the upper member upon the body, substantially as described.

2. A pencil having a body within which is a tube containing lead propelling mechanism, and means for securing the tube nonrotatably within the body consisting of a member fitted to each end ;of the tube and disposed in engaging relation to the adjacent portions of the body, one of said members being locked in a non-rotatable relation to the body, substantially as described.

3. A pencil having a body to one end of which is fitted a tip, and to the other end of which is fitted a cap in non-rotatable relation thereto, and means for preventing dislodgment of the cap and tip consisting of a tube arranged within the body and connected with boththe cap and tip, whereby the tube alsois secured non-rotatably within the body, the tube being adapted to contain mechanism for propelling a lead through the pencil, substantially as described.

4. A pencil having a body within which is atube containing lead propelling mechanism the actuating means whereof extend to a point exteriorly of the body, and means for securing the tube in place consisting of a combined ferrule and tip secured to the lower end of the tube with the flange of the ferrule in flush relation with the lower end of the body, and the tip having a bore of proper size to frictionally engage with a lead being propelled'through the body, a cap secured to the upper end of the tube having a flange in flush relation with the upper end of the body, there being a slot within the body in register with a second slot tending in substantialparallelism with said bore and in communication therewith, lead propelling mechanism in said bore, and

means 1n said bore lnclosing said mechanism pied and shutting off communication between said slot and said bore.

6. A .pencil having a relatively solid body provided with a bore extending longitudinally thereof, a slot in said body extending in substantial parallelism with said bore and 1ncommunication therewith, lead propelling mechanism in said-bore, means in said bore inclosing said mechanism and shutting off communication between said slotand said bore and a cap overlying one end of the body and connected to said inclosing means, said cap being provided with an aperture adapteld for registration with the end of said s 0t.

7. A. pencil having a tube in one end of which is rotatably mounted an interiorly threaded sleeve, a plunger adapted to enter the sleeve and provided with threads to cooperate therewith, an element projecting laterally of the plunger, flutings extended inwardly of the tube in the portion not occuby the sleeve and serving to guide the plunger in longitudinal movements only, the flutings terminating short of the point where the projecting element lies when the plunger reaches its forward limit of movement whereby the plunger is free at that point only to revolve within the tube, substantially as described.

8. In a pencil, the combination of two relatively rotatable parts, and a third part adapted with such rotation to be propelled longitudinally of the pencil, and means for arresting propulsion of the third part at the completion of its forward movement without interferring with continued relative rotation between the first two parts, substan tially'as described.

9. In a pencil, a plunger having a lateral projection, means for guiding the plunger in a longitudinal movement through the pencil, said means also engaging with the projection to hold the plunger against rotation within the pencil, and means for imparting longitudinal movements to the plunger, the means engaging with the projection being arranged to disengage therefrom when the plunger has completed its forward movement whereby the plunger is then free to rotate within the pencil, substantially as described.

10. In a pencil, the combination of two relatively rotatable parts, and a lead propelling plunger adapted with such rotation to be moved longitudinally of the pencil,

an interiorly threaded eraser sleeve mounted on the pencil, a platethreaded in the sleeve for supporting the eraser, and means for producing relative rotation between-the plate and sleeve operable when the plunger is reversely moved to a desired point, whereby the eraser is propelled outwardly, substantially as described.

11. A pencil having a body tapered at its lower end, a tube within the body, the tube being'formed interiorly to present guiding surfaces for a lead, a plunger adapted to travel longitudinally within the tube, means for imparting longitudinal movements to the plunger to thereby propel the lead, a combined tip and ferrule at the lower end of the body connected with the proximate end of the tube, there being a constricted passage in the tip for frictionally engaging the lead, the flange of the ferrule being disposed in overlying relation to the lower end of the body, substantially as described.

12. A pencil having a substantially solid body provided with an axial bore extending longitudinally thereof and from which radiate slots that open out at one end of the pencil, l'ead propelling mechanism arranged within the bore in a manner to close off each slot from the bore whereby to form a compartment adapted to receive a reserve lead, and a member positioned for closing, the open end of each slot and having an operative connection with the lead propelling mechanism and removable from the pencil, thereby permitting leads to be placed in or out of the several compartments within the body, substantially as described.

13. A pencil having a body on one end of which is a rotatable interiorly threaded eraser retaining sleeve, a plate threaded into the sleeve adapted to lie behind an eraser therewithin, a threaded plunger adapted to move longitudinally but not rotatably within the pencil body, operating means therefor adapted for actuation when the sleeve is rotated, the upper end of the plunger being formed to lock with the plate when the plunger is retracted into engagement therewith whereby the plate is held against movement relative to the sleeve, the threaded connection between the plate and sleeve being loose to permit the plate to adjust itself longitudinally thereof, substantially as described.

- 14. A pencil having a substantially solid body provided with a longitudinally extending bore, within which is a tube containing lead propelling mechanism, the pencil body having a plurality of slots formed therein and communicating with the bore but closed by said tube, whereby said slots may serve as a magazine for reserve leads, rotatable actuating means for the propelling mechanism mounted eXteriorly of the body at its upper end, said means constituting a closure for the magazine but being removable from the body to permit access there into, substantially as described.

15. A pencil having a body within which is mechanism for propelling a lead, rotatable actuating means therefor mounted exteriorly of the body at its a connection between the body and actuating means consisting of an exteriorly threaded upper end, and

is mechanism for propelling a lead, rotatable actuating means therefor mounted exteriorly of the body at its upper end, and a connection between the body and actuating means consisting of an exteriorly threaded cap secured to the upper end of the pencil,

and a member having a freely rotatable connection with the actuating means and threaded to engage with the cap, there being means for positively locking the cap against rotation relative to the body, substantially as described.

17. A pencil having a relatively solid body provided with a longitudinally extending bore from which radiate one or more slots, and lead propelling mechanism arranged within the bore in a manner to close ofi each slot in the form of a compartment which is adapted to receive one or more reserve leads, substantially as described.

18. A pencil having a relatively solid body, a longitudinally extending bore therein, one or more slots formed in said body in substantial parallelism to said bore and in lateral communication therewith, 'and leadpropelling mechanism carried in said bore and closing the avenue of communication between said bore and said slot or slots.

CHARLES R. KEERAN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5018891 *Jul 10, 1989May 28, 1991Kotobuko & Co., Ltd.Writing instrument with eraser dispenser
US5022774 *Oct 7, 1988Jun 11, 1991Kotobuki & Co., Ltd.Writing tool with eraser dispenser
US5062727 *Nov 21, 1988Nov 5, 1991Kotobuki & Co., Ltd.Writing tool
US5207522 *May 6, 1991May 4, 1993Kotobuki & Co., Ltd.Knock type mechanical pencil with retractable eraser
US6547465Jan 22, 2002Apr 15, 2003Shoot The Moon Products Ii, LlcPencil with exposable eraser
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/52, 401/75, 401/85, 15/429, 401/53
International ClassificationB43K21/08, B43K21/00
Cooperative ClassificationB43K21/085
European ClassificationB43K21/08D