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Publication numberUS1374669 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 12, 1921
Filing dateFeb 7, 1920
Priority dateFeb 7, 1920
Publication numberUS 1374669 A, US 1374669A, US-A-1374669, US1374669 A, US1374669A
InventorsMcclellan Harry H
Original AssigneeMcclellan Harry H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Foot-supporter
US 1374669 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. H. McCLELLAN.

FOOT SUPPORTER.

APPLICATION FILED FEB. 7, 1920. 4

1,374,669. Patented Apr.'12, 1921.

IN VEN TOR.

I A TTORNEYS.

v NORRIS FETEIS. INC-"Limo" WASNWGTON. D.

UNITED STATES ATENT OFFICE.

HARRY H. MGCLELLALN, or DAYTON, 0310.-

FOOT-SUPPORTER.

cation, reference being'had-therein to'the accompanying drawing.

' which may beworn without discomfort to the wearer and which may be adjusted by This invention relates to foot supporters and has for its object to provide improved flexible braces or bands adapted to fit closely about the ankle and instep of the foot,

and to be adjusted to compensate for variations or changes effected in the foot by the pressure exerted thereon.-

The. main object ofthe invention is to provide devices 'of this character'made of thin material and adapted to beworn inside the shoe, also inside the hosiery, if desired,

suitable 'lacings to exert pressure on the V bound portions of the foot whereby changes in the structure of the foot may be gradu-fally eife'cted.

The improved device is especially adapts ed for treatment' of deformed feet, com.- monly known as' flat foot 2 or fallen arch, and has been found effective in connect-ion with prescribed foot exercise and muscular treatment in gradually restoring-- fallen arches to their normal position.

An important feature of the' invention consists in the adjustability ofthebands to conform to the gradual change in the foot structure. Thus the required pressure may be brought to bear continuously on' the af-:

fected parts to restore the same to normal. In this 'respectthe adjustable bands have a marked advantage over the well known practice of wearing metal pads or supports inside the shoe to 'supportthe arch, in-which no provisionis made to compensate for the yielding ofthe fallen arch structure, except by substituting pads of variablesh'apes or sizes. I, a

In the accompanying drawmg;

Figure'l is adetail view showing the ad-' justable bands applied to a foot;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the device detached showing the manner of arranging the adjustable bindings; and

Fig. 3 shows a modified form the device applied to a foot. 7 7 It will be understood that the ad ustable Specification of Letters Patent. Patented Apr, 12, 1921, Application filed February 7, 1920. Sefial'No. 356,872. i

bands may be made of any suitable material and that the size and shape may be varied to suit variable foot deformities, the essent1al features of the invention consisting of-a suitable cover jacketor pads at the intersection of the bands which may be worn with comfort .next the skin or outside the hose which protects the foot from direct contact with theadjusting bands by means of which. pressure is brought to bear upon the por tionsof the footwhichar to be treated.

In the form shown in-Fig. 1 the inner part of the supporter consists of .the jacket or glove 1 whichis' made oftwo opposite pieces of leather 2 sewed together at the bottom and back to form thezja'cket which isadapted' to be laced over the ankle, as

shown at3, a flap strap4 being SGCHTGCltO one ofthe pieces 2 and projecting under 275 theopposite piece .2, under the lacing to r preventdiscomfort to the foot when the lac- 9 ing is drawn taut. The lower'portion of" the jacket is adapted to extend around the" foot over the instep,having opposite extensions 5 and 6, which are brought close together and 'may'overlap at their forward I edges when the jacket is in position on :the

foot, an open space 7 being formed between .theparts 5 and-6 and the lacing '3to per- 7 m1t free actionof the ankle when the jacket is worn. a A clearance. aperture 8 is also pro videdin the jacket for the heel of the foot to permit'freemovement of the heel, also to provide for a closer fitof the jacl ret to the foot, f

No novelty is claimed as to the details of thej a'cketdescribed, the arrangement being similar to well known forms offoot braces or lacing jackets, the form here shown being used only for the purposes of illustrating the invention which consists in using in combination with the jacket. or otherwise I the adjustable bands bymeans of which restoring of fallen archesis effected.

The adjusting bands maybe made ofany suitable material andarranged in any suit able manner as required for the purposes of the invention. As here shown, the bandsconsist of two non-elastictapes 9 and-10 which are secured, respectively, at one end to the extensions 5 and 6 of the lower por- 1 tion of thejacket, the ends 5 and (Sbeing padded or made double thickness as shown, to prevent discomfort to the foot when the tapes are drawntaut.

As here shown the tape9 is fastened in the part 5 on one side of the foot and is passed outwardly under the part 6 to the opposite side of the foot, thence through a keeper 11, downwardly across the sole of the foot, upwardly on the opposite side of the foot, through a keeper 12, passing above the heel to the opposite side of the foot again, and terminating in a, buckle strap 13. The tape 10 is arranged similar to the tape 9 but in the opposite direction, the tape being fastened in the part 6', passing under the part 5 and through a keeper 14 in the jacket, thence downwardly crossing the tape 9 on the bottom of the foot, thence upwardly through a keeper 15, again crossing the tape 9 above the heel and terminating in a buckle 13*, whereby the ends of the tapes 9 and 10 may be joined together and drawn taut.

From the foregoing detailed description it will be understood that the tapes 9 and 10 may be drawn taut to any desired extent,-the practice being in the application of the invention in treating fallen arches to exert as muchpressure at the points A, B, C and D as may be borne with comfort. At the point A the adjusting tapes are fastened, as above stated, in the jacket extensions ,5 and 6, making what is in effect an unyielding support for one end of the tapes and thus providing for the pressure that is applied at B and C when the tapes are drawn taut. At B the crossed tapes pass directly overthe tendon of'Achilles and the fibula or small bone of the lower leg, which together'with the tibia or large bone of the leg are more or less abnormal in their relation to the foot' at their lower ends in fal len arches on account of the lengthened fallen arch. Y

At C the tapes cross on the bottom of the foot and the combined pressure of the two tapes is exerted upwardly on the muscles of the foot and on the inner end of "the os calcis or the prominent bone'of the heel, also'on thetarsal bones which form the arch or instep of the foot.

From D the tension of the ta es is also exerted upwardly on the foot at the pressure at D permitting the rear ends of the tarsal bones and the front end of the 0s calcis bone which articulates therewith to rise toreform the arch, the tibia and fibula bones of the leg also being pressed into normal position by the pressure exerted at B. It will be observed-that the pressure at C is exerted upwardly on the arch of the foot from four directions, the combined actions of the tapes exerting relatively a very high pressure at this point; the pressure at B is also exerted from four directions, all tending to draw the lower ends of the bones of the leg inwardly to normal relation with the ankle and instep.

It is well understoodin physiology that and substituting foot-easing pads 16, 17 18.

and 19 at the points on the foot where the pressure is applied. The pressure bands 20[ and 21 are applied and function-substantially the same as in the form shown in Figs.

1 and 2.

It will be understood, of course, that further modifications may bemade in the de- 1 vice relative to the details of construction and arrangement without departing from the underlying principle of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus fully described my invention,

what I claim as new andidesire to secure .by

Letters Patent, is

1. In a foot support, the combination with a jacket adapted to fit closely a portion of the foot, of a plurality of bands cooperating.

with said jacket, secured'relative .to, each other above the instep and wound about' the foot in opposite directions, said bands lo-o intersecting at places and adjustable at their ends relative to each other, whereby variable pressure may be exertedaon theLfOOl'i':

from different directions at said pointsiof intersection- Q v v 2. In a foot 'supportpthe i co'mbination, with a jacket adapted to fitgclosely a por--- tion of the foot, of a plurality of bands cooperating with said jacket,- wound abo'utthe foot in opposite directions, intersecting above the heel. and on the bottom of the foot and adjustable to exert pressure on thefoot at said points of intersection. f

3. Ina foot support, the-combination,

with a jacket adapted to fit closely a portion of the foot, of a plurality of adjustable bands interlaced and'cooperating with said jacket, wound about the footin oppositejdij rections, intersecting onthe bottom of the foot, whereby pressure may-be? exerted on r the foot at the point of said intersection.

4. In a foot support, the combination,

with a jacket adapted to fit closely a portion of the foot, of .a plurality of adjustable bands interlaced and cooperating with said jacket, wound about the foot in opposite directions, intersecting on the bottom of the foot, whereby pressure will be'exerted on the foot at said point'of intersection from four directions. V

5. In a foot support, the. combination,of

a plurality of adjustable bands wound about the foot in opposite directions, intersecting above the heel and on the bottom of the foot, whereby pressure may be exerted on the foot from diiferent directions at said points of intersection.

6. In a foot support, the combination, with bands secured relative to each other above the instep and wound about the foot in opposite directions, intersecting at points and adjustable at their ends relative to each other, whereby variable pressure may be exerted on the foot from different directions at said points of intersection.

7. In a foot support, the combination, with a plurality of adjustable bands wound about the foot in opposite directions, intersecting, above the heel and on the bottom of nature.

the foot, whereby pressure may be exerted on the foot from d1iferent directions at said points of intersection, and means applied beabout the foot in opposite directions, inter- I seating above the heel and on the bottom of the foot, whereby pressure may be exerted on the 'foot from different directions at said points of intersection, and means applied beneath said bands to ease the 'foot at the points of concentrated bands.

In testimony whereof, I aflix' my sig- HARRY H. MoCLELLAN.

pressure of said

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3073305 *Mar 6, 1958Jan 15, 1963Surgical Appliance IndAnkle brace
US4323058 *Oct 14, 1980Apr 6, 1982Detty Garnett EAnkle brace
US4597395 *Aug 23, 1985Jul 1, 1986Barlow, Inc.Ankle support including a heel lock and a crossover strap
US4878504 *Jul 22, 1988Nov 7, 1989Nelson Ronald EAnkle brace with compression straps
US4962768 *Sep 12, 1988Oct 16, 1990Lawrence Thompson StromgrenStirrup-lock ankle support
US5621985 *Oct 2, 1995Apr 22, 1997Frost; John H.Jumping assist system
US5681271 *Sep 25, 1995Oct 28, 1997Nelson; Ronald E.Ankle brace with relief
US6126625 *Mar 19, 1997Oct 3, 2000Lundberg; Leslie C.Orthotic device for a joint of the human body
US6398750Oct 29, 1999Jun 4, 2002Patrick J. QuinnAnkle brace
US6652474Oct 19, 2000Nov 25, 2003Patrick J. QuinnAnkle brace
US7497839Aug 29, 2005Mar 3, 2009Swede-O, Inc.Ankle support
US7828759Apr 9, 2009Nov 9, 2010Arensdorf Stephen CHeel lock ankle support
US8272073Dec 31, 2007Sep 25, 2012Stromgren Athletics, Inc.Athletic protective padding
US20070049857 *Aug 29, 2005Mar 1, 2007Swede-O, Inc.Ankle support
US20080222766 *Dec 31, 2007Sep 18, 2008Arensdorf Stephen CAthletic protective padding
US20090013450 *Dec 19, 2006Jan 15, 2009Lambertz Bodo WSock
US20090270784 *Apr 9, 2009Oct 29, 2009Arensdorf Stephen CHeel lock ankle support
EP0627208A1 *May 28, 1994Dec 7, 1994SCHÜTT & GRUNDEI ORTHOPÄDIETECHNIK GmbHEpicondylitis bandage
EP2988708A4 *Apr 23, 2014Dec 7, 2016Mueller Sports Medicine IncAnkle brace
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/62, 602/65
International ClassificationA61F13/06
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/066
European ClassificationA61F13/06D4