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Publication numberUS1375646 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 19, 1921
Filing dateMay 14, 1919
Priority dateMay 14, 1919
Publication numberUS 1375646 A, US 1375646A, US-A-1375646, US1375646 A, US1375646A
InventorsNicholas D Belinski
Original AssigneeNicholas D Belinski
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical vaporizer and burner
US 1375646 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

N. D. BELINSKI.

ELECTRICAL VAPORIZER AND BURNER. APPLICATION FILED MAY 14, 1919.

1,375,646 Patented Apr. 19, 1921.-

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Patented Apr. 19, 1921.

APPLiCATION FILED MAY14, 1919.

gy ATTORNEYS N. D. BEUNSKI, ELECTRICAL VAPORIZER AND BUR NER. APPUCATION 111.1511 MAY 14, 1919.

Patented Apr. 19, 1921.

3 SHEETS-SHEET s.

W//VESSES Maw #ffy /W UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

NICHOLAS D. BELINSKI, 0F NEW YORK, N. Y.

ELECTRICAL VAPORIZER AND BURNER.

Application filed May 14, 1919. Serial No. 297,051.

To all whom t may concern.'

Be it known that I, NICHOLAS D. Bn- LINSKI, a citizen of Poland, and formerly a resident of Varsaw, Poland, at present residing in the city of New York borough of Manhattan, in the county and State of New York, have invented a new and improved Electrical Vaporizer and Burner, of which the following is a full, clear, and exact description.

The invention relates to internal combustion engines, and its object is to provide a new and improved -electrical vaporizer and burner arranged to convert liquid fuel into a Superheated burning vapor at the time of its passage into the working chamber of an engine cylinder. Another object is to render the engine self-starting.

Vith these and other objects in view, the invention consists of certain novel features of construction, as hereinafter shown and described and then speciiically pointed out in the claims.

A practical embodiment o' the invention is represented in the accompanying drawings forming a part of this speciiication, in which similar characters of reference indicate corresponding parts in all the views.

Figure l is a sectional side elevation of the improved vaporizer and burner as applied to the cylinder of an internal combustion engine;

Fig. 2 is a similar view of the lower por tion of the electrical vaporizer and burner with parts in a different position;

Fig. 3 is a sectional plan view of the electrical heater, the section being on the line 3-3 oit' Fig. l;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged sectional side elevation of the same, the section being on the line 4-4 of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a sectional side elevation of a modified form of the improved vaporizer and burnery as applied;

Fig. 6 is a similar view of the lower portion of the same with the combined electrode and valve in open position;

Fig. 7 is a sectional side elevation of an other modified form of the electricalvaporizer and burner;

Fig. 8 is a sectional side elevation of the lower portion of the same with parts in different position;

Fig. 9 is a sectional side elevation of' another modifled form of the improved electrical vaporizer and burner; and

Fig. l0 is a sectional side elevation of the lower portion of the same with the parts in a different position.

The cylindrical body 20 of the electrical vaporizer and burner lits into an opening 2l formed in the wall or head 22 of the cylinder of an internal combustion engine, and the outer end of the said body is provided with a flange 23 engaged by bolts 24 screwing into the wall or head 22 to securely fasten the valve body 20 in position on the cylinder. A combined electrode and Valve 'seat 25 is arranged centrally below the lower end of the valve body 2O and on it is normally seated a combined electrode and valve.

26. The electrode and valve seat 25 and the electrode and valve 26 are preferably made conical with corrugated portions 27 and 28 intermediate the apex and base ends, as plainly indicated in Figs. l and 2. The apex end of the combined electrode and valve seat 25 is provided with a tubular stem 29 screwing into a collar 30 seated on a ring 3l of an insulating material and resting on a shoulder 32 formed by concentric bores 33 and 34 arranged in the body 20. The central portion 40 of the combined electrode and Valve 26 is attached to the lower threaded end 41 of a valve stem 42 by the use of a nut 43 screwing on the threaded end 4l. The valve stem 42 extends centrally through a guiding tube 45, the lower end' 46 of which terminates on the apex end of the combined electrode and valve 26. When the combined electrode and valve 26 moves into an open position, as shown in Fig. 2, then a combined passage and spark gap 47 is formed between the combined electrode and valve seat 25 and the combined electrode and valve 26. The lower end 46 of the tube 45 is held spaced from the stem 29 by an insulating washer 48. The tube 45 is provided with a ring collar 50 seated on a. ring 5l resting on top of the stem 29 and the collar 50 is engaged by a ring nut 52 of insulating material and held in the upper portion of the collar 30. The sleeve nut 53 screws in the collar 30 to hold the ring nut 52 securely in place thus fastening the tube 45 in position. It is understood that the stem 42 is somewhat smaller in diameter than the interior diamthreaded end 57 of the stem 42 whereby the spring 55 normally holds the combined electrode and valve26 in contact with the combined electrode and valve seat 25. On the upper threaded end of the tube 45 screws a cap 58 inc-losing the spring 55, and the upper end of the cap 58 is provided with a nipple 59 connected by a coupling nut 6() with a section 61 of the feed pipe 62 connected with a pump or other suitable source of liquid fuel supply. rl`he feed pipe section 61 isconnected with the feed pipe 62 by a coupling 63 of insulating material. The nipple 59 of the cap 58 is connected with a contact 65 of an electrical circuit wire 66 connected with a suitable source of electrical energy' 67 electrically connected by a wire 68 with the cylinder wall or head 22 and hence with the body 20. The cap 58 rests on a collar 69 of an insulating material held on a plug 70 screwing into the upper end of the bore 34 of the body 20.

Between the lower end of the body 2O and the combined electrode and valve seat 25 is arranged an electrical heater 80 for heating the combined electrode and valve seat 25,` and by contact with the latter the combined electrode and valve 26, to convert the liquid fuel into a highly heated vapor which on passing through the combined passage and spark gap 47 is ignited by the spark between the lower ends of the said combined electrode and valve seat 25 and the combined electrode and valve 26. rlhe electrical heater 8O is preferably constructed as follows: On the corrugated portion 27 of the combined electrode and valve seat 25 is seated a copper ring 81 provided at its inner edge with an upwardly extending flange l82. On the top of the ring 81 is placed a ring 83 of mica or other similar material, on which is arranged a spirally shaped heating member 84, preferably ofl platinum, and on which is superimposed another ring 85 of mica or other insulating material, and on top of the ring 85 is arranged a ring 86 provided with an upwardly extending flange. 87 fitting into a recess 88 arranged on the under side of the body 20. One end 89 of the heating member 84 is in contact with the copper ring` 81, and the other end 90 of the said heating member 84 is in contact with the metallic ring 86 thus establishing an electrical connection between the body 2O and the combined electrode and valve seat 26 and with the heat-- ing member 84 forming part of the connection. A non-heat conducting material 91 is arranged on the ring 86 to provide a heat insulation between the body 20 and the heating element 84.

The operation is as follows:

Normally the combined electrode and valve. 26 is held in contact with the combined electrode and valve seat 25 by the action of the spring 55 pressing upward on the stem 42 of the combined electrode and valve 26. l/Vhen the parts are in this normal position the electrical circuit is closed and hence the electrical heater 8O heats the combined electrode and valve seat 25 and the combined electrode and valve 26. lVhen a liquid fuel is forced through the feed pipe 62 into the cap 58 and down through the tube 45 against the apex end of the combined electrode and valve 26 then the latter is moved downward by the force of the fluid and consequently the combined electrode and valve 26 moves into open position to allow the fluid to pass into the passage 47 to be highly heated and consequently converted into a vapor which on leaving the passage 47 is ignited by the spark at the lower end of the combined electrode and valve seat 25 and the combined electrode and valve 26.4 Thus the vapor is ignited on its entrance into the working chamber of the engine cylinder to act-nate the piston therein and thus start the engine. The heat developed in the working chamber by the burning fuel heats the combined electrode and valve seat 25 and the combined electrode and valve 26 thus requiring a comparatively little heat from the heater for converting the liquid fuel into a highly heated vapor.

It will be noticed that when the combined electrode and valve moves into open position, a passage is provided which gradually increases in size from the inlet end to the base or outlet end and hence the generated heated vapor readily expands and passes' as a conical sheet of flame into the working chamber of the cylinder.

1t will further. be noticed that by the conical members 25 and 26 acting as a vaporizer, the burning fuel in the working chamber of the cylinder is properly distributed. Thus the device may be used` as a substitute for the sprayer or atomizer used in the Diesel type of internal combustion engine. In the case when the fuel feeding the engine is in the form of gas, orany other combustible mixture, for example, compressed air carrying atomized crude oil, then heating and vaporizing the fuel is dispensed with and the cones may be made small Vand the passage for the fluid wider.

In the modified form shown in Figs. 5 and 6. the body 100 is held in a bore 101 by bolts 102 engaging a fla-nge 103 and ioo screwing inthe cylinder head 104 of the engine cylinder. The cylinder head 104 is provided with a gas inlet 105 connected with a suitable source of gas supply. The lower .end of the body 100 is formed into a conical combined electrode and valve seat 106 on which is normally seated a combined electrode the body 100 provides a chamber 113 in communication with the inlet 105 and leading to the ,combined electrode and valve seat 106. Onthe upper end of the sleeve 109 is secured a contact 115 connected by an electric circuit wire 116 with a source of electrical energy connected withthe cylinder the same as previously explained, whereby the combined electrode and valve Seat 106 and the combined electrode and valve 107 are normally in the closed circuit. A spring 117 is seated at its lower end on a collar 118 attached to the upper end of the sleeve 109 and the upper end of the spring 117 bears on a collar 119 abutting against a pin 120 attached to the upper end of the valve stem 108 tonormaily hold the combined electrode and valve 107 in closed position, that is, in contact with the combined electrode and valve seat 106. In this case the electric heater is dispensed with and the gas under pressure passing through the inlet 105 acts on the combined electrode and valve 107 to move the latter into open position, as shown in Fig. 6. When this takes place, a passage and spark gap 121 is formed by the passage of the gas into the cylinder and for igniting said gas by the spark at the spark gap 121.

In the modified form shown in Figs. 7 and 8, the body 130 is held in the opening 131 formed in the head or wall 132 of the cylinder of an internal combustion engine and the said head is fastened in place by bolts 133 engaging a iange 134 formed on the body 130. On the lower end of the body 130 screws a retaining nut 135 supporting a disk-shaped electrode 136 having a central opening 137 in register with a central opening 138 formed in a disk 139 of mica or other similar material. The opening 138 registers with an opening 140 formed in a tubular electrode 141 held in a sleeve 142 of porcelain or other suitable material and resting on the electrode 136 with a washer 143 interposed Vbetween the lower end of the sleeve 139 and the electrode 136 to insure perfect insulation between the electrodes 136 and 141. The electrode 141 is provided with a valve seat 145 controlled. by a needle valve 146 extending centrally throughthe electrode 141 and through a tube 147 screwing in the upper end of the electrode 141. The tube147 `is provided with an. inlet 148 connected with a source of liquid fuel supply. The needle valve'1'46 is provided above the inlet 148 with an enlarged portion 150 extending into a cap llcontaining a spring 152 bearing with its lower end `on a collar 153 secured tothe top of the enlarged portion 150 of the needle valve 146 to `hold the latter normally to its seat 145. The upper end of the spring 152 bearsagainst a disk 154 arranged on a screw rod 155 provided with a nut 156 engaging a contact 157 of an electric circuit wire 158 connected with a source of electrical energy `electrically connected with the cylinder` head .132,v the same as above described in reference to the device shown in Figs. 1 to 4. It will be noticed' that the iiuid passing into the tube 147 exerts an upward pressure on the enlargement 150 thus' lifting theneedle valve 146 against the tension :of the spring 152. The needle valve 146 is thus moved off its seat 145 to allow the liquid to pass, through the registering openings 140, 138 and 137 and to be ignited bythe spark passing from the electrode 141 to the electrode 136 (see Fig. 8). In this type of electrical vaporizer and burner use is preferably made of an alternating current transformed into a high tension current to `produce the desired annular spark at the spark gap. By the use of the mica washer the spark is'concentrated and hence rendered exceedingly etlicient. i It is understood that the Jfuel is readily vaporized on reaching the passage and spark gapy and ignited at this point.

In the modied formv shown in Figs. 9 and head 161`and its lower end 162 is coneshaped and provided with openings 163 tor the passage of the vapors into the cylinder. In the bottom of the body 160 screws an electrode 164,.the apex of which is in register with an aperture 165 formed in a tubular electrode 166 held in a sleeve 167 `formed of porcelain or other material and fitted into the body 160. The electrode 166 is-provided with a valve seat 170 normally closed byY a needle valve 171 extending centrally through the electrode 166 and through a corrugated tube 172 screwed to the. upper end of the electrode 166 and screwed into a sleeve 173 held on toplof the sleeve 167 and fastened in place by a retaining member 174 fastened in place by a nut 175 screwing on the upper end of the body 160. The needle valve 171 extends through the sleeve 17 3 and connects at its upper end with a nut 17 6 seated on top ofthe sleeve 17 3. A nipple 177 screws on the upper end of the sleeve 173 and is connected with a suitable source of liquid fuel supply. Normally the needle valve 171 is in closed position butfwhen a fluid under pressure is passed through the nipple 177 and into the sleeve 173 and through the tube 172 i into the electrode 166 then the pressure in the the cone-shaped electrode 164 to spread the liquid fuel and to ignite the same by the spark passing from the electrode 166 to theelectrodeljt (see F ig. 10). A i

From' the foregoing it will be seen that the electrical vaporizer and burner readily vaporizes the liquid fuel and ignites the same at its entrance into the working chamber, it being understood that sufficient air is present in the cylinder to insure full combustion.

It will further be noticed that any desired amount of fuel may be burned in the working chamber especially as the fuel does not depend on a specified proportion of hydrocarbon and air as is the case with carbureters. Furthermore, the burning of the vapor does not depend on the heat of Acompression as is the case in the Diesel engine. In consequence of that the engine supplied with this apparatus is able to run very slowly.

By the use `of the described apparatus the injection of `the Vvapor into the working chamber is produced by the pressure at which the liquid Vfuel is forced to the combination passage and spark gap and hence an air compressor for atomizing the fuel is not necessary.

Braking, stopping and reversing of theA engine when run at full speed may be accomf plished by producing successive counter-explosions in theV cylinder at the beginning of the compression stroke. The desired efficiency'is obtained as the combustion of the vaporized fuel proceeds rapidly and energetically on entering the cylinder. h

It may be noticed that the apparatus may -be used instead of the hot bulbs on the surface-ignition engines, as it performs the function ofthese hot bulbs to vaporize an ignite the fuel. Y

VThe cost of maintaining the electric circuit is comparatively small owing to the fact that very little heat is required for vaporization of the liquid fuel.

Both high and low tension circuits may be used. i

`Having thus described i' my invention, I`

claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent 1. An electric vaporizer and burner, comprising an electric circuit, circular electrodes in the said circuit'and forming an annular sparkgap and passage between them, and means normally closing the passage and adapted to be opened by the pressure of the fluid to allow the latter to flow through the passage and to be ignited by the annular spark. 2. An electrlcvaporlzer and burner,com

prising an electric circuit, normally contacting electrodes in the said circuit and mov-` able one relative to the other to form a pas.`

sage for a Huid between the electrodes and tok provide a spark gap for ignition ofthe fluid` as it leaves the passage, and feeding means for feeding a fluid under pressure between the electrodes to move Vthe same apart for forming the aforesaid passage and providing the aforesaid spark gap to ignitethe fiuid on leavingthe passage.

3. An electrical vaporizer and burner, comprising an electric circuit, 'inormally contacting electrodes inthe said circuit, the

saidelectrodes being movable one relative to the other to providev a spark gap, heating means for heating the electrodes, and means for feeding a combustible fluid between the electrodes to move the ysame apart for the` passage `of the fluid and for forming a spark gap to'ignitethe fiuid` as it'leaves the electrodes. Y Y n y 4. An Aelectrical vaporizer and burner, comprising an electric circuit,normally contactingV electrodes in the said circuit and movable one relative to the other to form a passage between the electrodes and to provide aA spark gap', electricalheating meansin the said circuit and connected with one of the electrodes to heat the same, and feeding means for feeding a combustible fiuid under pressure between the heated electrodes to open the latter, to allow the fluid to pass through the passage between the electrodes to becomeheated and finally ignited `by the spark at the spark gap. f

5. An electrical vaporizer and burner, comprising an electric circuit, apair of coacting electrodes in the saidIcircuit, one of said electrodes being in the form of a valve seat, a valve normally seated on the said valve seat, an electric heater for the said valve seat and in the said circuit,and means for feeding a fluid under pressure against the valve to open the latter to provide a spark gap to allow the fluid to pass between the valve and valve seat to be heated thereby and to be ignited on leaving the valve by the sparks between fthe electrodes.

i 6. An electrical vaporizer. and burner for internal combustion engines, comprising a body attached to the cylinder of an internal combustion engine, a cone-shaped combined electrode and valve seat held insulated on the said body, a cone-shaped combined elec'- trode and valve normally seated on the said combined electrode and valve seat, and means feeding aV fluid under pressure onto the apeX end of the said `combined electrode and valve to open the latter and thereby provide a passage for the fluid andto provide a spark gap at the edges of the valve and valve seat for igniting the fluid passing throuvh the passage.

7 n electrical vaporizer and burner for internal combustion engines, comprising a body attached to the cylinder of an internal combustion engine, a cone-shaped combined electrode and valve seat held insulated on the said body, a cone-shaped combined electrode and valve normally seated on the said combined electrode and valve seat, a stem carrying the said combined electrode and valve, a spring pressing the said stem to normally hold the combined electrode and valve in closed position, and means feeding a fluid under pressure onto the apex end of the said combined electrode and valve to open the latter and thereby provide a passage for the fluid and to provide a spark gap at the edges of the valve "and valve seat for igniting the fluid passing through the passage.

8. An electrical vaporizer and burner for internal combustion engines, comprising a body attached to the cylinder of an internal combustion engine, a cone-shaped combined electrode and valve seat held insulated on the said body, a cone-shaped combined electrode and valve normally seated on the said combined electrode and valve seat, a stem carrying the said combined electrode and valve, a sprin pressing the said stem, a tube held insu ated on the said body and through which extends the said tube to form a passage for a fluid leading to the apex end of the said inclined electrode and valve, and a feed pipe connected with the said tube to feed a fluid under pressure to the tube.

9. An electrical vaporizer and burner for internal combustion engines, comprising a body attached to the cylinder of an internal combustion-engine, a cone-shaped combined electrode and valve seat held insulated on the said body, a cone-shaped combined electrode and valve normally seated on the said combined electrode and valve seat, a stem carrying the said combined electrode and valve, a spring pressing the said stem, a tube held insulated on the said body and through which extends the said tube to form a passage for a fluid leading to the apex end of the said inclined electrode and valve, a feed pipe connected with the said tube to feed a fluid under pressure to the tube, an electrical heater mounted on the said combined electrode and valve seat, and an electrical circuit containing the said heater, the said combined electrode and valve seat and the said combined electrode and valve.

NICHOLAS D. BELINSKI.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3762378 *Nov 8, 1971Oct 2, 1973F BitontiFuel injection means and process for making same
US7958721 *Jun 29, 2007Jun 14, 2011Caterpillar Inc.Regeneration system having integral purge and ignition device
US8006482Nov 7, 2007Aug 30, 2011Caterpillar Inc.Method of purging fluid injector by heating
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/208, 431/256
International ClassificationF02M53/06, F02M53/04
Cooperative ClassificationF02M2700/077, F02M53/06, F02M53/04
European ClassificationF02M53/04, F02M53/06