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Publication numberUS1379057 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 24, 1921
Filing dateNov 6, 1918
Priority dateNov 6, 1918
Publication numberUS 1379057 A, US 1379057A, US-A-1379057, US1379057 A, US1379057A
InventorsSpelling Thomas C
Original AssigneeSpelling Thomas C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fountain-pen
US 1379057 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

T. C. SPELLING.

FOUNTAIN PEN.

APPLICATION FILED NOV. 6. 191a Patented May 24, 1921.

INVENTOR.

UNITED STATES P T FF CE "f THOMAS C. SPELLING, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.

FOUNTAIN-PEN.

I Specification of Letters Patent. 7 Patented May 2 4,

Application filed November e, 1918. Serial no. 261,420.

To all whom it may concern: I

Be it known that I, THOMAS C(SPELLING, a citizen of the United States, residing at New York city, in the county of New Yorkand State of New York, have invented certain new land useful Improvements in Fountain-Pens, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to parchment, or the like, and belongs to the class bearing the designation of fountain pens. Its purpose is the provision of a pens, because the fountain penpoint must have "a peculiar formation different from the common penpoint; and for its use,'ink of particular ingredients and consistency is required. But for this device any one of a score or more kinds of points, and particu-' larly, any of the many brands of ink manufactured for common use can beused. Not only are valvular filling, clogging, smearing and inferior 'penmanship here obviated, but superiority of convenience, safekeeping, durability and cleanliness are obvious characteristics, all of which will be explained in this specification, and pointed out in the claims, in connection with the drawings.

Figure 1 is atop View of the device. Fig.

- 2 is a partly sectional side view of the device put together for carrying it in a garment pocket, or other receptacle. -F1g. 3 1s a side elevation ofthe device ready for use except that the two sections of the pen holder are slightly. separated, penpoints being.

. shown. 'Fig. 4: is a view of either'side of the upper section .of the holder and of the ink receptacle, showing a modification in.

the means by which; saidtwo parts are secured together. Fig. 5 is the upper portion of the tube shown in Fig. 4, looking at either the right or left of it. Fig. 6 is atop view of the lower section when held upright as in the lower part of 'Fig. 3, with mechanisms for. recording letters and figures on paper,'

- serves !as. an ink well.

attached to the top surface,4, of thismempen points in the centralopening; therein. Fig. 7 illustrates still another modification of the fastening means. A

Numerals will be used herein to designate parts, as an aid to description, the same numeral designating identical parts in'the different views.

The cap 31, should be formed of metal, or any durable substance; The mouth 1, has a short cylindrical sect-ion, 2, and a section, 3 above that, the sides of which are outwardly and upwardly slanted, giving it the shape of a diminutive inkwell; in ot-her words the cap, when notv vused as such, Four arms, 5, are

her, withpins, the heads of which are desig nated by reference numerals, 6. The dotted lines, 32 in Fig. 1 show these arms turned out to increase base area, in detached use.

it is necessary-that one ofsthembe formed of resilient substance, because, in turning an arm out, the free end of the one arm must be sprung upward and the armslid overone of its fellows. When one arm hasbeen turned out, there is nothing to interfere with revolving the others on the;pins,serving as pivots, and .likewise turning them out.

In two opposite sides of the cylindrical section, 2, of the cap are formed the slots,

7. To secure perfect engagements of the hook, 26, as well as to facilitate; its; disengagement, the edgesabove and below the slot are conversely slanted, the lower edges outward and upward, and the upper edges 7 downward and inward. I

In View of the possibility thatsome users e p In. the same figure-the arms are seen 1n locked relation. In. order to freethem from the locked relation, to beturned out,

may prefer to keep it in a receptacle, the

incisions, 25,.316 :made in the sides of the cap, near the top, and into these, the tipsfof a finger may be inserted to raise it out of any compartment.

The stopper, 27,. may-V be formed of any suitable material, but preferably of rubber, cork or the like. It will have formed 'on it the shoulder, 8, around the middle The closure-means presently more fully described requires that the cap befittedeon the top of the penstock with yielding but strongly resisting pressure, in order that the cap fastener can be given firm binding effect., And that result is attained by the combination of the compression of this shoulder due to the resilient force of the binding arms, 16. i i

The stopper, 27, has ends identical in shape and size, the stopper being cylindrical. Either end is adapted to be fitted into the top,.11, of the penholder or into the mouth 1, of the cap. But the end fitted into the top of the penholder should be firmly fastened and held therein, either with a transverse locking pin or otherwise. The upper member, 12, of the penholder, tubular in form, is preferably made of thin sheet metal, though celluloid, hard rubber, or the like could be used. The edges, 13, of the tube indicate that from the point, 1.4, to the base, the substance of the tube is left disunited, the purpose of which is to impart flexibility, needed for the gripping and holding of the lower member 15, of the penstock. The binding arms, 16, are formed in the upper member to grip and hold the cap in place. Since these are identical in form and coact in use, a description of one will suflice. It will be soldered or otherwise attached to the substance of the upper member, as seen at 17. It is curved upward at 18, and forms the elbow, 24:, and beyond that, it resumes a vertical direction, and on that part is formed the short hook, 26, of

slot 7. The arm, 16, in normally bent position, should fall short of reaching into the slot, 7, so that the shoulder, 8, must be pinched between the end .of the penholder and end of the cap in order to snap the hook, 26, into place, causing resilient frictlonal engagement. This formation of the arm is suchthat pressure on the curve, 18,

moves the hook, 26, on the surface of the perpendicular section, 2, of the cap until it snaps into the slot, 7. To release the engagement, further and additional pressure is applied to the curve, which moves the hook upward and out of the slot, that being the result of the approach of the curve to a vertical relation and of the contact of the elbow with said surface. In this act, the penholder may be partially revolved on the stopper, to cause the hook to rest on unbroken surface of the cap and thus prevent reengagement in the act of separation.

The lower member, 15, of the penholder carries the shield, 21, suitably attached at of several penpoints (which may be of the preparation for writing. suitable dimension to fit into, and engage,

ink for a great amount of writing.

ders, 30, formed on or attached to the cap.

Inasmuch as the invention may be emsame make or of different kinds,) or of penpoints and a penwiper, or other small artiusers hand from ink'stain. This capalso confinesthe penpoints, etc. within the penpoint chamber, 23. It is slitted as shown at 33 to impart to it gripping force.

When thedevice is to be used, it is stood on the cap, the base arms, 5,'first being turned out. Pressure of thefingersofmone hand on the upward curves, l8,of the hind ing arms, causes the hook, 26, to rise out of the slot, 7. With the fingers of the other hand, the penstock is now separated from the top cap, containing ink, the lower member is extracted and reversed, the terminal cap removed and transferred to the stopper, the shorter end 20 of member 15, below the enlargement, is inserted in the upper mem- When use of the device suspended the replacement of the parts isaccomplished by a reversal of the process of preparation;

The quantity of ink to be carried within the cap will of course depend upon its in terior dimensions, which is subject to the option of the manufacturer. But a very slight increase of horizontal diameter in the expanded portion beyond the diameter of the mouth will afford capacity for sufficient The modification illustrated in 4 consists merely in the provision of plain hooks,

28, attached to the cap at 29, and formed and dimensioned to engage slanted shoul- The fastening means illustrated in Fig; 7 comprises the opening 34, in the side: of the cap at the. base, the binding arm, 35, to automatically and frictionally engage it upon turning the cap toward it, and the ring, 36, resting on the penholder. Two such fasteners, oppositely disposed,may be provided. The ring, 36, is held by cross pin, 37, and frictional engagement. occurs at 38.

bodied in various other forms of varying sizes, I do not, by reason of the foregoing description and these drawings, preclude myselfof the right toembody it in other forms, and to supply it to other uses, eonsistently'with these specifications and claims.

Having now fully described my inven-., tion, I claim as follows: i

1. A. writing implement comprising a tube, a cap, a member carrying a shield for a penpoint, and a stopper, the tube and cap detachably secured to each other on the stopper.

2. A writing implement comprising a tube, a cap, a member carrying a shield for a penpoint, and a stopper, the shield carrying member formed with interior space in the end opposite that carrying the shield, for storage of penpoints and other small articles.

3. In a writing implement comprising a tube, a cap,a shield carrying member, and a stopper, means for binding and impacting the tube and cap oppositely on an encircling exterior shoulder of the stopper.

4. In a writing implement comprising a tube, a cap, a shield carrying member, and a stopper, means for binding and impacting the tube and cap oppositely on an encircling exterior shoulder of the stopper, the means consisting of oppositely positioned resilient arms securely attached to the tube, the arms having detachable engagements in notches in the neck of the cap.

5. In a writing implement comprising a tube, a cap, a shield carrying member, and a stopper, means for binding and impacting the tube and cap oppositely on an encircling exterior shoulder of the stopper, the means consisting of oppositely positioned resilient arms securely attached to the tube, the arms having detachable engagements in notches in the neck of the cap, each arm formed with an upward curve, a downwardly projected elbow, a straight section, and an inturned hook.

6. In a writing implement comprising a tube, a cap, a shield carrying member, and a stopper, means for binding and impacting the tube and cap oppositely on an encircling exterior shoulder of the stopper, the means consisting of oppositely positioned resilient arms securely attached to the tube, the arms .having detachable engagement in notches in.

tioned in place for engagement with a notch I in the neck of the cap.

7. A writing implement comprising a tube, a cap, a shield carrying member and a stopper, and means for increasingthe top area of the'cap, in detached use.

8. In a writing implement comprising a tube, a cap, a shield carrying member and a stopper, means for increasing the top. area of the cap, in detached use, and means consisting of flat arms pivoted in and on the top of the cap and converged to interlocked relation, centrally, the pivot for each arm positioned near the exterior edge of the top of the cap, the section of each arm exterior to the pivot being shorter than the section interiorto the pivot when in interlocked relation.

9. In a writing implement comprising a tube, a cap, a shield carrying member and a stopper, means forincreasing the top area of the cap, in detached use, the means consisting of flat arms pivoted in and on the top of the cap and converged to interlocked relation, centrally, one of the interlocking arms formed of resilient material.

In testimony whereof, I aflix my signature in presence of two witnesses.

MARY A. ENGEL, RENA MELOHER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2453491 *Nov 29, 1944Nov 9, 1948Cardin Carl JFountain pen
US20120141189 *Sep 1, 2010Jun 7, 2012Mitsubishi Pencil Company, LimitedValved applicator
EP1525818A1 *Mar 23, 2004Apr 27, 2005Morris CorporationStick-type glue dispenser with quick-opening cap
EP2474425A1 *Sep 1, 2010Jul 11, 2012Mitsubishi Pencil Company, LimitedValved applicator
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/125, 211/69.5, 401/131, 401/195
International ClassificationB43K23/00, B43K23/12, B43L27/00, B43L27/02, B43K23/04
Cooperative ClassificationB43L27/02, B43K23/04, B43K23/12
European ClassificationB43L27/02, B43K23/04, B43K23/12