Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1379210 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 24, 1921
Filing dateJul 21, 1919
Priority dateJul 21, 1919
Publication numberUS 1379210 A, US 1379210A, US-A-1379210, US1379210 A, US1379210A
InventorsPhillips John H
Original AssigneePhillips John H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Anchor-shell drill
US 1379210 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J. H. PHILLIPS.

ANCHOR SHELL DRILL.

APPLICATION FILED JULY 21. 1919.

Patented May 24, 1921.

3 SHEETS-SHEET I- EZ/IZ J. H. PHILLIPS.

ANCHOR SHELL DRILL.

APPLICATION FILED IULYZI. 19w.

1 379,2 1 0. P tented May 24, 1921.

3 suzsr's-suzzr 2.

3 3593 49 I A Q 31 @Z I 2'9 34 A;

I. H. PHILLIPS.

ANCHOR SHELL DRILL.

APPLICATION FILED .IULYZI- I919- 1 ,379,2 1 O. Patented May 24, 1921.

3 EEEE TS S H E E T 3.

UNITED STATES JOHN H. PHILLIPS, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

ANCHOR-SHELL DRILL.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented May 24, 1921.

Application filed July 21, 1919. Serial No. 312,243.

To all whom itmay concern:

Be it known that I, J OHN H. PHILLIPS, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Anchor-Shell Drills, of which the following is a description.

My invention belongs to that general class of devices known as stone drills, and relates particularly to a hollow, shell or core type of drill, so constructed as to drill a number of holes in concrete, brick, stone or like material, then to be utilized, with other suitable arts, as an anchor or ex ansion bolt for fiistening and holding various devices and mechanisms to said materials. Anchor or expansion bolts are largely used on ceilings, walls and floors of concrete, brick and stone, for the support of pipe and wire systems, and mechanical, electrical and other equipment, etc. There are many types and sizes of anchor, or as commonly known, expansion bolts, in use, and in the use of any and all types it is first necessary to drill suitable holes to receive them, this requires the use of separate drills of suitable size for the expansion bolt used. This use of separate drills'is expensive and unsatisfactory. In many instances the right size drill is not available, and in many cases the drills used are larger or smaller than should be, and of a type that does not make round or smooth finished holes, thereby failing to give most efficient, workmanlike and economic results. My invention has among its objects the production of a combined drill and shell of the kind described that is simple, convenient, efiicient, durable, inexpensive and suitable for use wherever found applicable. My in vention has among its further objects the production of a drill shell which ma be used as a drill and thereafter utilize in conjunction with suitable parts, as an anchor or expansion bolt or part thereof in the hole it drilled. The invention has particularly among its objects the production of a device of the kind described embodying both the features of drill and expansion bolt, eliminating the necessity of separate drills thereby simplifying and reducing to a minimourn the cost of such fastenings, and by use of the shell in its own hole insuring the right size and depth hole, perfect fit, most workmanllke, durable, efficient and economic results.

To this end my invention consistsin the novel construction, arrangement and combination of parts herein shown and described, and more particularly pointed out in the claims.

In the drawings, wherein like reference cha'acters indicate like or corresponding par s,

Figure 1 is a sectional view through a two part drill, which drill may after be used as an expansion shell; 7

Fig. 2 is a similar view of the two sections separated with a bolt and expander shown;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken substantially on line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Flg. 4 is a sectional view illustrating a half drill and an open end cast shell;

Fig. 5 is a similar view of a half drill and closed end cast shell;

Fig. 6 is an end view of the same;

Fig. 7 is an end viewg Fig. 8 is a view in elevation of a. drill and chuck, a portion of the chuck being in cross section;

Fig. 9 is a view in elevation of a slightly modified form. of drill from that shown in Figs. 1 and 9;

Fig. 10 is a sectional view through the same, the parts separated slightly;

Fig. 11 is a sectional view particularly illustrating a modified cast shell and expander;

Fig. 12 is a sectional view of the same with bolt and expander removed;

Fig. 13 is a sectional view taken substan tially on line 14-14 of Fig. 12;

Fig. 14: is a view in elevation of a slightly modified form of drill;

Fig. 15 is an end view of the same;

Fig. 16 is a sectional view of the same and its cooperating chuck;

Fig. 17 is a sectional view taken substantially on line 18-18 of Fig. 17

Fig. 18 is an end view of a portion of the chuck,"

Fig. 19 is a view in elevation of the shell and bolt in use;

Fig. 20 is an end view of the shell and hole with expander arranged thereon;

Fig. 21 is a view in elevation of the bolt the same being similar to the expander shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 26 is a view in elevation showing the inside of a modified drill;

Fig. 27 is a view in elevation of the same, two parts being shown 5 Fig. 28 is a similar vlew showing the same in the chuck, the chuck being partially shown in section;

Fig. 29 illustrates this type of drill in use as an expansion shell;

Fig. 30 illustrates a modified form of drill, the chuck being shown in section; and

Fig. 31 illustrates the same drill used as an anchoring drill shell carrying a flat hanger.

Referring to the drawings, particularly Figs. 1 to 8, there is shown a two part shell drill and auxiliary parts, of a tapered end type, in which the tapered end projects beyond the face of the material drilled or in which the parts are permanently used. This type is particularly adapted to use with round rod hangers for pipe, etc., and for use with bolts or bolts and nuts on fastenings where the projecting end will not interfere. Figs. 1 and 2 represent two drill parts, which are provided with cutting teeth or edges 3, the cutting end being preferably slightly larger for clearance, as at 4. The parts are made of suitable material, in the preferred way and of the desired size. The end opposite the cutting edges is preferably tapered as at 5-5, and I prefer to provide holes or notches 6 in each drill part which coincide, when the two drill parts are together, forming holes. The parts are preferably cut away as at 7 so as to form mclined faces on the two parts. Referring to Fig. 8, 8 represents the head of a suitable chuck or holder having a shank 9, which chuck is recessed as at 10 so as to fit the tapered end 5-5. The chuck head 8 is shown tubular as at 11 with an opening 12 through which the drillings may escape so that the same do not clog up the drill or require the drill to be removed for cleaning. The chuck may be operated in any suitable manner, the same shown being substantially a reciprocating or percussion chuck which may be operated by a spring, compressed air, electric, hand or other suitable type of hammer. After using the parts as a drill, the same may be used, in conjunction with other suitable parts, as an expansion or anchor bolt. The number of holes which may be drilled with this shell drill will vary according to the material from which it is made and method of making, and according to material to be drilled. When made of a like grade of drill steel it will drill equally as many holes as other types of drills, and when made of cheaper material and case hardened will drill fewer holes. In either case the worn or used drill parts are used with auxiliary parts of cheaper construction, as permanent fastenings in the holes drilled. The odd holes thus drilled will exceed the number of drill parts in which case auxiliary or like parts of cheaper material and construction will be used, to the end that the drill parts make all necessary holes of the right size and in combination with other cheaper parts be utilized as permanent fastenings in the most satisfactory and economical way. In Fig. 2 I have shown the two drill parts and a round hanger rod or bolt 15, upon which is arranged an expanding nut 17 having Wedge shaped or tapered win s 18 arrnged to engage the faces 7. bviously, after the hole is drilled, the drill parts may then be placed on the bolt or rod upon-which is the nut 17, and inserted in the hole. The wings 18 of nut 17 project beyond the end of nut 17 and are of such width and taper that when drill parts are together the wings extend beyond end 3 of the same, and when inserted 1n the hole will come in contact with the bottom of the hole first, the hole being a neat fit. Any further travel of drill parts in contact with the wings 18 will cause the parts to open or expand in contact with the walls of the hole, and a few blows of the hammer will be sufficient to drive the drill parts to the bottom of the hole. If rod or bolt 15, which is threaded through nut 17, is turned or screwed against the bottom of the hole, it causes a further wedging or expanding of the parts and securely holds the same in position until load or pull is applied to the rod or bolt 15, the permanent load having a further wedging or expanding effect thus firmly locking the parts in the hole. Cutting away a portion to provide the faces 77 also provides a clearance space so that drillings may escape from the end' into the tubular bore. In case the parts wedge in the chuck tightly, the insertion of a tool in holes 6 easily loosens the same for removal of the chuck.

In Fig. 4, 2 represents one of the drill parts and 21 one of the auxiliary or cooperating half shells of cheaper construction, for example, a cast part or pressed steel without the cutting teeth or edges. The half shell 21 may be formed with corrugations or rough surface 22 arranged to engage with the wall of the hole and with the inclined faces 23. The same is also shown with the extending part 24 at one side arranged to seat in the notch 6 of the drill part. It may be mentioned that the part 24 is arranged only on one side of the shell, so that when two cast shells are employed, the extending part of one will engage in the notch of the other. The shell 25 shown in Fig. 5 is similar except that the end is closed by an extending part 26. In this type the rod or bolt 15 will screw against the closed end of the shell instead of against the bottom of the hole as previously described.

A modified form of drill is shown in Figs. 9, 10, 11 and 12, in which 28 represents the drill parts formed with continuous cutting edges similar to the drill previously described. In this case the inner walls are formed as at 32 and the inclined faces are omitted. As shown in Figs. 11 12 and 13, however, the cooperating cast shell and expanding nut are modified. As shown, the shell 29, which if desired may be formed with the closed end portion 30, is formed with an inclined face 31. In this case the threaded bolt or rod 33 is provided with a nut 34, etc., preferably extending as at 35 and would screw against the bottom of the hole or closed end of the shell as previously described, and would travel the nut in such manner as to open or expand the parts in the hole. It is of course obvious that an auxiliary half shell similar to the drill part may be used in conjunction with shell part 29 where holes drilled exceed the worn drill parts available.

Figs. 14 to 20 show a straight end or flush type shell drill, sli htly modified in construction but embo ying the salient points of the drills previously described. This type is suitable for use with rod hangers, bots, or bolts and nuts, on various fastenings where the projecting end of the shells previously mentioned would not be suitable.

In operation this type drills a hole full length of the drill shell and when ermanently set is flush with the face of t e material drilled or in which it is used. Referring to these figures, 38 represents the drill parts formed with the inclined faces, but with cutting teeth or edges formed on the opposite end 40. The drill parts are also shown with corrugations or ribs as at 41. The drill may be operated by means of a suitable chuck consisting of the part 44 having a shank 45 of suitable length. It should be understood that the chuck and shank are operated by any suitable hammer or mechanlsm, as before mentioned. The chuck in this case is shown with an extending part 46 and with a sleeve 47, the sleeve being preferably maintained in place by a spring 48 or its equivalent, 49 being an outlet for the drillings. With this type of drill and chuck a hole may be drilled the full length of the drill shell, after which the shell may be reversed and used as an expansion shell, as illustrated in Fig. 19. The sliding sleeve is removed and the shell 47 and lugs 46 maintain the drill parts together in proper relation, but the sleeve yields when it comes in contact with the work. As shown in Fig. 19, 50 represents the work or ceiling and 51 a bolt which may be provided with the wings 52 or the equivalent arrangedto engage the inclined faces 42. In this case the part 53 to be fastened is maintained in place by bolt 51 and nut 54. It is believed that the construction will be obvious.

Figs. 26 to 29 illustrate a lag screw type of drill shell 57, with tapered end 59, in which the tapered end 59 projects beyond the face of the material drilled or in which the parts are permanently used. This type is used in conjunction with a lag screw which opens or expands the parts when screwed to place and at the same time fastens and maintains in position the part to be held. It is also understood that this shell can be made flush type and operated with the chuck previously described for use with the flush type shell drills 15 to 21. Fig. 26 represents the drill parts formed with cutting edges or teeth 58 and with the tapered end 59 and holes or notches 60. The interior is preferably threaded as at 61, beginning with a full thread adjacent to the tapered end, which thread becomes shallower toward the cuttin end 58 and runs out entirely just short 0 the end or cutting teeth, in such manner as to leave a round straight hole of a diameter corresponding to the diameter of the lag screw at the root of the'thread. This hole acts as a passage for drillings, and the diminishing thread in conjunction with the tapered screw causes the shell parts to open as the screw enters. it ghuck 62 is arranged to operate the drill s e Figs. 30 and 31 represent a square end projecting type of drill shell, to be used where it is desired to carry flat bar or wire hangers or ties. Referring to these figures, 67 represents the drill parts provided with the cutting teeth 68, and 69 represents the material which is the wall or ceiling to be drilled, and which will support or carry the ban er and part to be hung or fastened. The drilT is arranged to seat in a suitable chuck 70. The drill parts are cut away as shown at 71 forming notches into which lugs 73 project to prevent the drill parts turning in the chuck while operating. 72 represents holes. After the hole is drilled the chuck arts secured in place by inserting a core of ead 7 4 or equivalent material, and driving the same toward and against the end of the hole, thereby exanding the shell arts. A fiat bar hanger 75 maybe secure in place by means 0 a pin, bolt or equivalent 76 extending through the holes in the bar and through the holes 7 2.,

It will be noted that all the drill shells described are of two part construction, but it is understood that the may be of one, two or more parts, suita ly split and arranged for expansion, as may be required for any particular purpose. vantage of this shell or core type of drill, which may be mentioned here, over other types of fluted or flat type drills commonly used, is that practically 50% of the material removed in drilling is in the form of a core which breaks oil? in short pieces as the drill progresses, whereas with the fluted or fiat drill all material removed is crushed or pulverized, requiring that much more work in drilling. The various possible combinations and uses of the shell drill Will be obvious to those skilled in the art from the disclosures herein given. It will also be readly seen that a much less weight of material is required in the shell drill than in present types in use, and that cost of manufacture will be less, considering drills of equal size. When made of like material the drill shell will drill as many holes as other drills, before its use as an expansion shell. The use of the drill shell as an expansion bolt after drilling its hole, permits of making them of cheap material and case hardening. Such shells will drill a limited number of holes depending upon the material drilled, but in such material as concrete, brick and stone commonly used. in building construction, will in all cases drill its own hole and in most cases a number of holes suflicient to make its use with auxiliary parts economical. When made of cheaper material the form of the shell drill permits punching them from the bar and forming 1n a press, which means rapid production and low cost. 3

Having thus described my invention it is obvious that various immaterial modifications may be made in the same without departing from the spirit of my invention; hence I do not wish to be understood as limiting myself to the exact form, construction, arrangement and combination of parts herein shown and described, or uses mentioned.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A drill com rising a plurality of cooperating similar y formed parts arranged together to provide a tubular shell, the parts at one end of the shell enlarged and provided with cutting teeth at the extreme end, said parts cut away at their juncture adjacent said end to provide substantially V- shaped recesses, the opposite end of said shell parts arranged for engagement with a cooperating chuck.

2. A drill comprising a tubular shell provided with a cutting edge at one end and arranged at the opposite end for en agement with a suitable chuck, said shell ormed to cooperate with suitable means for expand- Another ading the same, whereby the shell may be expaiided to engage the walls of the drilled ho e.

3. A device of the kind described comprising a plurality of parts constructed to cooperate to provide a tubular shell with cutting edges at one end, and means projecting into the shell for separating said parts at one end.

4. A drill comprising a tubular shell provided with a cutting face at one end and arranged at the opposite end for engagement with a suitable chuck, and means for expanding the shell in the drilled hole after operation of the same as a drill.

5. A tubular drill of the kind described comprising a shell part formed with cutting edges at one end and arranged at the opposite end to cooperate with a suitable chuck, an expander arranged in said shell at one end, and means projecting to the exterior of the shell at the opposite end for actuating said expander, whereby the drill may be expanded in the drilled hole and retained therein to support said expander and projectirig means.

6. n a device of the kind described and in combination, a shell drill provided with an opening therethrough, a bar projecting theremto at one end, and means on said bar for expanding the shell at the opposite end.

7 A tubular shell drill comprising a plurality of parts, a bar projecting thereinto from one end, and means on said bar for engaging the parts at their juncture and expanding the shell thereat.

8. A combined drill and expanding anchor bolt shell comprising a tubular shell formed with cutting edges at one end and arranged at the opposite end to engage a suitable chuck, and means for expanding said parts at one end in the drilled hole comprising a bolt threaded at the end and projecting thereinto, and an adjustable nut on said bolt.

9. A shell drill of the kind described comprising a tubular shell formed with cutting edges at one end arranged at the opposite on to engage a suitable chuck, and means for expanding the shell after removal of the chuck comprising a bolt projecting into the shell, and means on said bolt for expanding said shell parts.

10. A drill consisting of an expansible tubular shell provided with cutting teeth at one end and constructed with a taper at the op site end.

11. drill consisting of an expansible tubular shell provided with cutting teeth at one end and constructed at the'opposite end to engage a suitable chuck.

12. A drill comprising two similarly formed arts, each part having teeth at one end and tapered at the opposite end, and constructed to provide a tubular bore through the parts, each part formed to cooperate with an expander, whereby the parts may be separated and separately used with a cooperating shell part and provide an expansion shell.

13. An expansible drill shell comprising two similarly formed parts, constructed to assemble, for use as a drill, in the form of a tubular'shell having cutting teeth or edges formed on one end thereof and having the opposite end tapered to engage with a cooperating chuck, and means for expanding or wedging the said two parts'in the hole drilled when using asa permanent anchor or fastenin 14. A drill consisting of an expansible tubular shell provided with cutting means and provided with means for engaging a 00- operating chuck.

15. A self-drilling expansion shell consisting of an expansible tubular shell provided with drilling edges, and constructed to engage a suitable chuck while drilling, and means for expanding the shell in the hole, said shell arranged for engagement with cooperating fastening devices.

16. A self-drilling expansion shell consisting of an expansible shell body part provided with drilling edges, and constructed for engagement with coiiperating fastening devices.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto signed my name in the presence of two subscribing witnesses.

J OIDI Hp PHILLIPS. Witnesses ROY W. HILL Cmnms I. done.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2787931 *May 29, 1953Apr 9, 1957Republic Steel CorpMine roof bolts with multiple piece shell having u-shaped spring holding means
US3221590 *Apr 25, 1963Dec 7, 1965Eastern CoExpansion shell with converging planar surfaces in planes forming a dihedral
US4402637 *Nov 10, 1980Sep 6, 1983Hilti AktiengesellschaftSelf-drilling dowel
US5181816 *Oct 26, 1990Jan 26, 1993Walsh James HRemovable anchor tube assembly
WO2008041836A1 *Mar 6, 2007Apr 10, 2008Kok Hua LiowAn improved sleeve anchor
Classifications
U.S. Classification411/31, 175/286, 175/315
International ClassificationB28D1/14, F16B13/00, F16B13/13
Cooperative ClassificationF16B13/002, B28D1/146
European ClassificationF16B13/00B, B28D1/14C