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Publication numberUS1380879 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 7, 1921
Filing dateMay 19, 1913
Priority dateMay 19, 1913
Publication numberUS 1380879 A, US 1380879A, US-A-1380879, US1380879 A, US1380879A
InventorsYoung Carl
Original AssigneeYoung Carl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe
US 1380879 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. YOUNG.

SHOE. APPLlCA T|0N FILED MAY 19, 1913- RENEWED NOV. 3, I920.

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UNITED STATES CARL YOUNG, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS.

SHOE.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented June 7, 1921.

Application filed May 19, 1913, Serial No. 768,500. Renewed November 3, 1920; Serial No. 421,599

To (11.? whom it may concern:

lie it known that I, CARL YOUNG, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago. in the county of Cook and State of Illinois. have invented a certain new and useful Improvement in Shoes, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates to shoes and has for its object to provide a new and improved shoe of which the following is a description.

The invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings wherein Figure 1 is a view of a shoe with parts broken away showing one form of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a view with parts broken away sliowing the inside of the .bottom of the s we;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 33 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged view of one of the spiral springs.

Fig. 5 is a sectional view through one of the ventilating openings in the sole.

Like numerals refer to like parts throughout the several figures.

For purpose of illustration, I have shown my invention in connection with an ordinary shoe. This shoe may be provided with an exterior sole piece 1 of leather or any other suitable material. Within this sole piece, I prefer to provide a metal plate 2. Above the metal plate may be placed a piece of oil silk 3. I provide a series of spiral springs 4 located between two pieces of flexible waterproofmaterial 5 and 6, such as waterproof canvas or other cloth. These springs are preferably made of spring wire and are coiled in a spiral form so that the several coils when the spring is collapsed may pass within each other so as to permit a proper collapse of the spring without interference, thus making the device when completely collapsed the thickness equal to the diameter of the wire. The two waterproof pieces 5 and 6 are preferably waterproofed with some adhesive material or adhesive material is used therein so that when assembling the parts, the springs will adhere to these pieces so as to keep the parts in pro-per relation. 3

I prefer to provide above the waterproofed piece 6 a piece of oil silk 7. The insole 8 is above this oil silk and a strip of felt 9 above the insole, and a piece 10 above the felt. The pieces" 9 and 10 are preferably quilted together. It is necessary that these springs be spiral springs and-not coiled springs'because coiled springs are impracticable.

I prefer to make the part or sole piece containing the springs separate from. the shoe so that it can be sewed separately therefrom and placed in any shoe while it is being manufactured. For this purpose, I may use the pieces 5 and 6 of suitable material, preferably waterproof, and place the sprlngs between them and then fasten them together by sewlng or any other suitable means so as to keep the springs in proper relation to each other, making the device of different sizes for different size shoes so that said dev ces may be inserted in the shoe wh1le belng manufactured.

I also prefer to provide the shoe when des red with an arch supporting device consisting of the spiral springs 11 confined between thepieces 10 and 12 and attached to the bottom of the shoe so as to come under the arch and elastically support it. The spiral springs 4 may be placed under the toe and the heel or may extend entirely along the shoe as illustrated. By using the waterproof pieces in contact with the oil silk, I have found that the oil silk is preserved from cracking. The spiral springs may be located in pro or position to elastipally sustain the weig t of the user of the s 0e.

I prefer to place the large end of the spiral spring at the topand the small end at the bottom. The spiral springs may be held in place in any desired manner, but I have found that when the pieces 5 and 6 have adhesive qualities, the springs will be held in place and will become indented in the shoe when used so that they can not be displaced. 4

I also prefer to provide a steel spring .piece 13 at the instep or archxsupporting part of the shoe, said spring piece being located below the springs 4 as shown.v A

piece of leather or" other suitable material I 13 is placed over the steel spring piece ,or

shank 13. This leather deadens thev noise that might be produced by the contact of metal upon metal. The leather piece 13- overlaps the piece 13 at both ends and may be held in place by ordinary shoe tacks driven into said ends. This leather also holds the spring 13 in place. i

I also prefer to provide ventilating means for the shoes consisting of a series of openings 14 communicating with the space 15 in which the springs are contained so that when the springs are collapsed, air will be forced. out through said openings.

The upper part 16 of the shoe may be made of any desired form and construction.

In walking the openings 14 are so posi tioned that the bones of the foot cover them and act as valves which close the openings when the weight is on the foot and thus cause the air in the space 15 to be forced out'through the bottom of the shoe, the pressure of the foot when the openings 14 are closed causing this air to be forced out through the bottom seams. \Vhen the foot is lifted, the springs 4 expand, and the valves, as it were, are lifted off of the openings 14 and the air comes in through the top of the shoe and through said openings into the space 15. This causes a ventilation of the shoe not noticeable to the wearer and drives out moisture which may be in the shoe. The plate 2 may be of metal or any other suitable substance. I may use the waterproof covering without the oil silk if desired. The waterproof material used may be any kind desired, mineral wax securing good results.

When the spring and inclosing parts are made at the place where the shoes are manufactured so that they can be placed in the shoe while it is being manufactured, sewing of the covering for the springs will not be necessary, as the entire intersole consisting of the springs and the waterproof covering can be placed in position in the sole of the shoe, the adhesiveness of the waterproof covering holding the springs in place during this operation. y

In view of the fact that the shoe becomes quite narrow between the heel and the toe, that is at the shank, the spiral springs in this narrow portion may be placed with the small end at the top. The space 15 provides a compartment which has a tendency to equalize the temperature at all times and during all seasons. The upper part of the shoe may be lined to any extent with the waterproof material or the oil silk I have illustrated in Fig. 3. This waterproof material 17 is inserted next to the leather covering 16 and the oil silk 18 may be placed inside of it. This waterproof material and oil silk extends to the seam and forms, as

it were, an adhesive lining both above and,

on the bottom of the shoe and is forced in around the stitching during the process of manufacture and has a tendency to waterproof the seam.

I prefer to cut away a portion of the insole 8 which, is over the springs at the heel of the shoe as shown by the dotted line 19 so as to give the heel greater elasticity and an action similar to that of a rubber heel.

When this portion of the insole is removed,

the springs press the waterproof material 6 and the oil silk 7 up into the space caused by the removal of this piece of insole as shown in Fig. 1.

As shown in Fig. 3 the parts 5 and 6 connected together by the scan; 20 and upper, insole, and welt are connected by seam 21 and the Welt is connected with outsole by the seam'22.

I claim:

1. A shoe comprising a sole made up of separated sections having a space between them extending substantially the entire length of the shoe, and a separate elastic sole piece comprising a series of spiral springs in the bottom of the shoe, and flexible inclosing pieces between which said springs are held, said separate sole piece fitting in said space and extending substantially the length thereof.

2. A shoe comprising a sole made up of separated sections having a space between them extending substantially the entire arc the the the length of the shoe and a separate elastic sole piece comprising a series of spiral springs in the bottom of the shoe, and flexible inclosing pieces between which said springs are held, said flexible inclosing pieces being Waterproofed, said separate sole piece contained in the space between said sole sections.

3. A shoe comprising a sole made up of sections having a space between them, and a separate elastic sole piece comprising a series of spiral springs and flexible inclosing pieces between which said springs are held, said separate sole piece fitting in said space. said flexible inclosing pieces being provided with adhesive material which tends to cause the springs to adhere thereto and to be kept in place while the separate sole piece is separate from the shoe.

4. A shoe comprising a sole made up of sections with an air space between them, a series of separate spiral springs in said space arranged so that the various coils fit in with each other when the springs are collapsed, a waterproof covering for said spiral springs. and means for causing said springs to adhere to said waterproof covering.

5. A shoe comprising a sole made up of sections having a space between them, a series of spiral springs located in said space, and a second series of spiral springs located above the first series of springs near the instep of the shoe and extending only partway along the shoe.

6. A shoe comprising a sole made up of sections having a space between them, a separate elastic sole piece comprising a series of spiral springs and flexible inclosing pieces between which said springs are held, said separate sole piece fitting in said space, said flexible inclosing pieces being provided with adhesive material which tends to cause the springs to adhere thereto, and to be kept in place while the separate sole piece is separate from the shoe, and a second series of spiral springs located above the first mentioned springs near the instep of the shoe.

7. A shoe comprising a sole having tWO sections with an air space between them, spiral springs located in said air space, flexible waterproofed pieces on each side of said spiral springs, and a piece of oiled silkengaging the outer face of each of said waterproof pieces.

8. A shoe comprising a sole made up of sections having a space between them, and a series of spiral springs in said space, said sole having ventilating openings at the point where the ball of the foot is received when the shoe is in use and connecting said space with the interior of the shoe, said openings arranged so that the bones of the foot act as valves therefor to open and close said openings during the process of walking so that air from the inside of the shoe passes through said openings and is forced out through the seams at the bottom of the shoe.

9. A shoe comprising a series of spiral springs, two pieces of flexible waterproof material having a space between them into which space sald springs are received, and a piece of oiled silk on the upper side of the upper waterproofed piece, the pieces of waterproof material above and below said springs being sewed together so as to form a complete unitary structure.

19. A shoe comprising a series of spiral springs, two pieces of flexible waterproof material having a space between them into which space said springs are received, and' a piece of oiled silk on the upper side of the upper .waterproofed piece, the pieces of waterproof material above and below said springs being sewed together so as to form a complete unitary structure, the parts above the spring being provided with a series of ventilating openings communicating with said space and with the interior of the shoe.

In testimony whereof, I aflix my signature in the pesence of two witnesses this 17th day of ay, 1913.

CARL YOUNG. Witnesses:

MINNIE SUNDFAR, .DENIE A. WALTERS.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2720041 *Mar 31, 1953Oct 11, 1955Kalman KajtarFootwear with provision to change the air therein
US4074446 *Jun 18, 1976Feb 21, 1978Joel Howard EisenbergSki boot
US4144659 *Feb 6, 1978Mar 20, 1979Eisenberg Joel HowardSki boot
US4253252 *Mar 14, 1979Mar 3, 1981Eisenberg Joel HowardSki boot
US4267648 *Sep 19, 1979May 19, 1981Weisz Vera CShoe sole with low profile integral spring system
US4322893 *Apr 3, 1980Apr 6, 1982Halvorsen Norrine MIndependent insole assembly
US4535553 *Sep 12, 1983Aug 20, 1985Nike, Inc.Shock absorbing sole layer
US5235761 *Oct 3, 1991Aug 17, 1993Chang Che YuanMultiple-purpose elastic shoe
US5435079 *Dec 20, 1993Jul 25, 1995Gallegos; Alvaro Z.Spring athletic shoe
US6029374 *May 28, 1997Feb 29, 2000Herr; Hugh M.Shoe and foot prosthesis with bending beam spring structures
US6449878Mar 10, 2000Sep 17, 2002Robert M. LydenArticle of footwear having a spring element and selectively removable components
US6601042May 17, 2000Jul 29, 2003Robert M. LydenCustomized article of footwear and method of conducting retail and internet business
US6665957 *Oct 18, 2001Dec 23, 2003Shoe Spring, Inc.Fluid flow system for spring-cushioned shoe
US6865824 *May 14, 2003Mar 15, 2005Levert Francis E.Fluid flow system for spring-cushioned shoe
US7016867May 21, 2002Mar 21, 2006Lyden Robert MMethod of conducting business including making and selling a custom article of footwear
US7107235Oct 24, 2002Sep 12, 2006Lyden Robert MMethod of conducting business including making and selling a custom article of footwear
US7159338Jan 31, 2005Jan 9, 2007Levert Francis EFluid flow system for spring-cushioned shoe
US7441347 *Jul 1, 2005Oct 28, 2008Levert Francis EShock resistant shoe
US7600330 *Mar 9, 2006Oct 13, 2009Eu-Top CorporationShoe structure
US7752775Sep 11, 2006Jul 13, 2010Lyden Robert MFootwear with removable lasting board and cleats
US7770306Aug 23, 2007Aug 10, 2010Lyden Robert MCustom article of footwear
US8209883Jul 8, 2010Jul 3, 2012Robert Michael LydenCustom article of footwear and method of making the same
DE2726778A1 *Jun 14, 1977Dec 22, 1977Joel Howard EisenbergSkistiefel
EP1435207A1 *Jan 3, 2003Jul 7, 2004Winner Shoe Co. Ltd.Shock-absorbing sole pad assembly
WO1995017109A1 *Dec 20, 1994Jun 29, 1995Alvaro Z GallegosSpring athletic shoe
WO2000060971A1 *Apr 7, 2000Oct 19, 2000Artemio MenicucciCushion insole
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/3.00R, 36/28
International ClassificationA43B17/06
Cooperative ClassificationA43B17/06
European ClassificationA43B17/06