Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS1381331 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1921
Filing dateSep 8, 1919
Publication numberUS 1381331 A, US 1381331A, US-A-1381331, US1381331 A, US1381331A
InventorsCharles Pohl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fuel-feed system
US 1381331 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. POHL.

FUEL FEED SYSTEM.

APPLlCATlON man SEPT. 8. ms.

Patented June 14, 1921.

I n I UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

,GHARLES POHL, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOR TO JOHN 0. KING, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA.

FUEL-FEED SYSTEM.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented June 14, 1921.

Application filed September 8, 1919. Serial No. 322,327.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, CHARLES Form, a citizen of the United States, residing at Los Angeles, in the county of Los Angeles and State of California, have invented a new and useful F uel-Feed System, of which the following is a specification. i

This invention relates to liquid fuel carbure ting' systems and has more particular relation to auxiliary carbureting means for supplying a combustible mixtureto an internal combustion engine, automatically controlled by the speed of the engine and independent of the main carburetor.

' The object of the invention is to provide an improved system of liquid fuel carburation whichconsists of combining a fuel mist drawn from the gasolene supply tank above the liquid level, with heated air created in a heat chamber and entraining the resulting combustible mixture into the intake manifold of the engine between the engine and the main carbureter and which further con sists of automatically controlling said mixture by the speed of the engine.

Further objects relate to the combination of elements and arrangement of parts utilized in applying the system to the standard form of automobile engine and equipment.

Various other objects and advantages will more fully appear in the subjoined detailed specification.

In the accompanying drawing which illustratesa preferred form of embodiment of the invention:

Figure l is 'an elevation of a conventional automobile engine and gasolene supply tank, showing the application of my improved device thereto. 4

Fig. 2 is anenlarged linesv -m of Fig. 1. a

Fig. 3 is an enlarged detail section on line w m of'Fig. 2.

Fig.4 is an enlarged detail section on line ar -w of Fig. 1.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged detail section on line fi-w of Fig. 4.

In the drawings, 1 designates the engine having the exhaust'manifold 2, the intake detail section on manifold 3, and the main carburetor 4. The

gasolene supply conduit 6. The strainer unit which is incorporated in the intake conduit comprises a body portion 7 having a wire screen 8 and clamped in position be tween the carbureter and intake manifold by suitable bolts 9-9.

An elbow fitting 10 is screw threaded into the intake manifold 3 and connects with an auxiliary control valve fitting 11 having a valve seat 12 and a cooperating ball valve 13 normally yieldingly retained upon said seat by a spring 14. Connected to the valve fitting 11 is a T fitting providing a mixing tube 15, one end thereof being provided with a cup-shaped breaking screen 16 and connected by a conduit 17 to the top of the gasolene supplytank 5 above the liquid level.

'As shown, the connection is through the filling cap 18 but'it is obvious that. it may connect through any portion of the tank which is above the liquid level. The filling cap is provided with the usual safety vent 20.

A cup-like casing 21, providing a heat chamber 22, engages over the outer periphery of the exhaust manifold 2 and is secured in place by straps 2823, or any other suitable means, the walls of the casing being contoured to fit the outer surface of the manifold, leaving a small intake port 24. Thiscasing, being constructed of relatively thick cast iron, holds the heat generatedby the manifold, which causes the air drawn into the chamber to become heated, thereby producing a supply of heated air. This heated air is drawn from the chamber, through a conduit 25, to the end of the mixing tube 15 opposite to that which connects with the conduit. 17, said conduit 25 being coiled to form an intermediate cooling coil 26.

While I have shown the casing 21 applied to the exhaust manifold it is to be understood that this position is selected as being the most convenient for attaching said casing and that a suitable casing may be applied to any portion of the engine which radiates suflicient heat. Also while I have shown the casing as provided with an intake port 24, this is merely illustrative of the principle of operation. In practice, the casing 21 being applied to the substantially rough cast iron manifold does not have an airtight lit with the manifold surface, the.

unevenness of said surface providing minute air passages around the entire contacting edge of the casing, wh ch in their aggregate, equal the area of a single port of the required size.

In starting the engine the mixture .13 supplied in the usual manner by the mam carburetor, the control valve 13 being retalned in closed position until the engine gains speed and suction sufficient to overcome the tension of the valve spring 14, after which said valve opens and closes in various degrees coordinate to the various engine speeds. The agitation of the gasolene in the supply tank 5, bythe vibration of the engineand the travel of the automobile, creates a fog or fuel mist within the upper portlon of the tank, and this fuel mist, already in finely divided form, is drawn; through the conduit 17 and through the breaking screen 16 which further breaks up the fuel mist, presenting it to the mixing tube 15 in the most finely divided form where it 1s combined with the heated air from the chamber 22 to form perfect explosive mixture.

The heatedair', as it is drawn from the heating chamber, is of a temperature which. if entrained direct to the mixing tube 15. would ignite the fuel mist coming from the tank, therefore the intermediate cooling coil 26 is provided to reduce the temperature of the air to a point of safety. '1.

This system of carburation produces a full vaporization of all of the fuel drawn into the engine and produces a full clean explosion thereof. This prevents overheating and the accumulation of carbon both of which are caused by foul explosions.

In utilizing the fuel vapor created in the fuel tank I save a large portion of this rich fuel impregnated air which would. under ordinary conditions, be lost through the safety'vent of the tank.

I claim:

1. A system of supplying a combustible mixture to an internal combustion engine, which includes the fuel supply tank, the main carbureter, the connecting fuel supply conduit and the intake manifold of the engins, a control valve communicating with the intake manifold, means cooperating with a heat radiating area of the engine to produce a supplyof heated air, a conduit connecting said means to the control valve and having an intermediate cooling element, and a second conduit connected to the fuel supply, tank above the liquid level and to the control; valve for entraining fuel vapor to said valve. v

2. A system of supplying a combustible mixture to an internal combustion engine, which includes the fuel supply t k, h main carbureter, the connecting fuel, supply conduit and the intake manifold of the engine, a control valve communicating with the intake manifold, a mixing tube communicating with the control valve, means cooperating with a heat radiating area of the engine to produce a supply of heated air, a conduit connecting said means to the mixing tube and having an intermediate cooling element, and a second conduit connected to the fuel supply tank above the liquid level and to the mixing tube for entraining fuel vapor to said tube.

A system of supplying a combustible mixture to an internal combustion engine, which includes the fuel supply tank, the main carburetor, the connecting fuel supply conduit and the intake manifold of the engine, a control valve communicating with the intake manifold, a mixing tube communicating with the control valve and having axially alined intake ports, means cooperating witha heat radiating area of the engine to produce a supply of heated air, a conduit connecting said means with one port of the mixing tube and having an intermediate cooling element, and a second conduit connected to the fuel supply tank above the liquid level and to the other port of the mixing tube.

4:- i-i. system of supplying a combustible mixture to an internal combustion engine, 7

which includes the fuel supply tank, the

main carbureter, the connecting fuel supply conduit and the intake manifold of the engine, a control valve communicating with the intake manifold, a mixing tube communicating with the control valve, a screen in the mixing tube, means cooperating with a heat radiatingarea of the engine to produce a supply of heated air, a conduit connccting said means with the mixing tube and having an intermediate cooling element, and a second conduit connected with the fuel supply tank above the liquid level and tothe mixing tube.

5. A, system of supplying a combustible mixture to an internal combustion engine, which includes the fuel supply tank, the main carburetor, the connecting fuel supply conduit, the intake manifold and the exhaust manifold, a control valve communicating with the intake manifold. means cooperating with the exhaust manifold for producing a supply of heated air of relatively high temperature a conduit connecting said means to the control valve and formed to reduce the temperature of the entrained air, and a second conduit connected to the fuel supply tank above the liquid level and to the control valve.

6. A system of supplying a combustible mixture to an internal combustion engine, which includes means cooperating with a heat radiating area of the engine for producing. a supply of heated air of relatively high-temperature, a control device communieating with the intake manifold of the engine, a conduit connecting said means to said control device, and formed to reduce -the temperature of the entrained air, and a second conduit connected to the fuel supply tank above the liquid level and to the control device.

7. A system of supplying a combustible mixture to aninternal combustion engine, which includes means for producing a supply of heated air, and devices for reducing the temperature of and for entraining said air, and fuel impregnated air from the fuel supply tank to a mixing device communicating with the intake manifold of the engine.

8. A method of supplying a combustible mixture to an internal combustion engine,

which includes, first reducing the temperature of heated air radiated by the engine to a point below the igniting temperature of the combustible mixture and then combining said air with fuel impregnated air drawn from a fuel supply tank and entraining the combined mixture into the intake manifold of the engine.

9. A system of supplying a combustible mixture to an internal combustion engine, which includes the fuel supply tank, the main carbureter, the connecting fuel supply conduit, the intake manifold and the exhaust manifold of the engine, a control valve communicating with the intake manifold, a casing cooperating with the exhaust manifold to form a heat chamber producing a supply of heated air of relatively high temperature, a conduit connecting said chamber to the control valve and formed to reduce the temperature of the heated air, and a second conduit connected to the supply tank above the liquid level and to the control valve.

Signed at Los Angeles, California this 3rd day of September, 1919.

CHARLES POHL.

lVitnesses CLARENCE B. Fos'rnn, L. BELLE WEAVER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2444199 *Sep 19, 1942Jun 29, 1948Klaburner Chester FCharge forming device
US2671012 *Apr 6, 1950Mar 2, 1954Perry Claude DDevice for utilizing gas fumes from gasoline tanks
US4386593 *May 12, 1981Jun 7, 1983William Dan Douglas, Jr.Fuel-air injection control system for internal combustion engines
US4520787 *Dec 27, 1983Jun 4, 1985Nissan Motor Co., Ltd.Intake air heating system for an internal combustion engine
WO1981001032A1 *Oct 10, 1980Apr 16, 1981D RobinsonMixing chamber for an intake manifold
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/557, 261/DIG.450, 261/16, 137/605, 261/72.1, 55/DIG.280, 123/556
International ClassificationF02M1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M2700/4345, F02M1/00, Y10S261/45, Y10S55/28
European ClassificationF02M1/00