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Publication numberUS1381660 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 14, 1921
Filing dateOct 31, 1918
Priority dateOct 31, 1918
Publication numberUS 1381660 A, US 1381660A, US-A-1381660, US1381660 A, US1381660A
InventorsBuxton Rathbun Ross
Original AssigneeBuxton Rathbun Ross
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of removing solids suspended in moving gases
US 1381660 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. B RATHBUN. METHOD OF REMOVING souns SUSPENDED IN MOVING GASES.

APPLICATION FILED OCT, 3], I918.

Patented June 14, 1921.

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T a- WITNESS 684% M WWW/FNMA R B) I W M rmmvers ROSS IBUXTON RATUII, 0h SALT LAKE GI'T'ST, UTAH.

METHOD OF REMOVING SOLIDS SUSPENDED Illl' MOVING: GASES.-

res-re Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented June let. l92l,

Application filed @ctober 31, 1918. Serial No. 260,464.

T 0 all whom it may concern."

Be it known that 1, Ross BUXTON RATH- BUN, a citizen of the United States, and resident of Salt Lake City, in the county of Salt Lake and State of Utah, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Methods of Removing Solids Suspended in Moving Gases, of which the following is a specification. I

The invention relates in general to an improvement in the art of precipitating solids suspended in moving gaseous streams in which art the gaseous streams are passed through an electrostatic field and specifically relates'to a new form of electrode for use in connection with this treatment of gases.

The primary object of this invention is to improve the efficiency of electrical precipitation and incidental to. this general desideratum it is a further object of the invention to reduce the cost of both the original installation of the systemand the succeeding cost of operation.

Various other objects and advantages of the invention will be in part obvious from an inspection of the accompanying drawings and in part will be more fully set forth in the following particular description of one form of mechanism embodying my inven: tion, and the invention also consists in certain new and novel features of construction and combination of parts hereinafter set forth (and claimed.

Tn order to illustrate one form of apparatus capable of carrying out the new mode of treatment, reference is made to the accompanying drawing, in which- Figure l is a vertical transverse sectional view through a gas conducting flue or chamber equipped with a preferred embodiment of my invention; and

Fig. 2 is a horizontal sectional view through the same and taken on the line 2-20f Fig l. T

.lln the accompanying drawing, there is shown a. flue chamber l0mounted on sup-v ports 11 and for the purpose of this disclosure vthis chamber .may be considered as any of the gas conducting -flues found in metallurgical plants. I

- A plurality of fine meshed wire screens 12 are positioned in the conduit 10 and spaced apart in the direction of the flow of the gas therethrough as indicated by the arrows 1n Fig. 2. These screens are electrically coupled together, insulated from the active electrode and grounded at g to form the passive electrode. Both electrodes constitute the collecting agency for receiving the ionized particles as they are passed through the electro-static field. The active electrode elements are formed of a plurality of fine wlres 13, positioned between each pair of screen electrodes and spaced apart from each other and from thescreen electrodes. These wires, constituting the elements of the activeelectrode, are electrically connected to a suitable source of electric energy as is usual with lmown types of these devices. I a I The gas streams bearing the suspended solids are passed through influence of the strong electric field created and the line particles of fume are agglomerated into a larger mass and these together with the larger particles, commonly called flue dust receive a charge by contacting with the surrounding static lines of force where they join the wires of the screens, increasing the potential gradients in their vicinity and thereby increasing the zone of ionization. There results a materially improved rate of dust precipitation per unit area and per unit weight of electrode and the loss of draft due to friction is reduced and the temperature conserved. There also results an economy in the use of this improved device in that the screen and wire sets can be mounted in any convenient flue or. conduit, thus avoiding the necessity of special construction to accommodate the treater. Further as there is but little metal in the screens and their cost is much less than the cost of similar areas of without departing metal plate, there is a material saving in Having thus described my invention, ll

claim:

1. lln the art of removing solids from gaseous bodies, the process which consists in passing all particles of a'body of gas along substantially parallel lines and through a series of electro-static fields disposed in the direction of flow of the gas so that all of the gas willbe compelled to pass through more than one field and equally treated, each of said fields characterized by having lines of force which extend in the general direction of flow of the gases and in which the lines of force converge to increase the "potential gradient and thus increase the zone of ionization.

2. In the art of removing solids from gaseous bodies, the process which consists ill Sill)- jecting all portions of the as equally to the action of an electro-stat-ic eld in which the lines of force converge toward a plurality of passive lines spaced apart transversely of the line of gas How and causing all of the gas to move between said passive lines and substantially in the mean general direction of said lines of force.

3. In the art of electrical precipitation of solids from gases in which an active elec-v trode element and a plurality of spaced I apart passive electrode elements having perforations therein are employed, the process which consists in passing the gases through said perforations and in a direction to cause them to move in parallel lines from one of the electrode elements to the other substantially in the direction of the lines of torce between the electrode elements.

4. In the art of electridal precipitation of solids from gaseous streams, the process which consists in creating a series of electrostatic fields in each of which the lines of force converge in sets and pass in one direction from a plurality of perforated passive electrodes and causing the" gaseous stream to traverse said fields and at right angles to the plane of the passive electrodes substantially in the mean direction of said lines of force while limiting the flow of gas to, the electrostatic field whereby all particles of the gas will be subjected to the electric treatment.

5. In a device of the class described, the

a flow of path coextensive with the cross-section of the path and spaced apart in the direction oil the gases passing therethrough, a plurality of sets of transversely spaced apart electrodes disposed between adjacent screens and spaced from said screens. to create an electrostatic fieldvbetween each electrode and the adjacent screens and to act as collectors for collecting .the dustprecipitated from the gases.

6. ln a device of the class described, the combination of a conduit for gases, means for creating an electro-static field in said conduit, said means including a screen constituting a passive electrode disposed transversely across said conduit and, provided with openings to permit the passage of the gases therethrough, and a wire constituting an active electrodespaced from said passive electrode and coacting therewith to form an electro-static field to precipitate solids from the passing gases and ineansfor causing the gases to pass at right angles to and through the plane of the screen and in a direction from the screen to the wire.

7. In a device of the class described, the combination of a plurality of parallel spaced apart metallic screens constituting passive electrode elements, a p urality of active electrode elements disposed between adjacent pairs of screens, said active elements being spaced apart transversely to permit gases to pass between the same and being spaced from the screens and means'tor directing all of the gases successively through the meshes of the screen electrode elements.

8. In a device of the class described, the combination of a plurality of parallel spaced apart metallic screens, constituting passive electrode elements, aplurality of active electrode elements in the form of fine wires disposed between adjacent pairs of screens, said active elements being spaced apart to permit gases to-pa etween the same and being spaced from the screens and means for directing gases perpendicularly through the meshes of the screen electrode elements and between the active electrode elements, said screens being connected electrically and grounded and said active electrodes designed to be connected to a source of electric energy.

9. lln a device of the class described; the combination of a gas conduit and means for creating an electro-static field of uniform intensity entirely across in said conduit, said means including electrodes of relatively large exposed surface extending entirely across the path of the gases in sald conduit and with the elements thereof spaced apart and permitting the gases to flow therethrough and other electrodes of relatively small exposed surface spaced from the large surface electrodes lengthwise of the conduit and exposed on each side to thezlarge surface electrodes.

10. In a device of the class described, the 5 combination of a gas conduit and means for creating an electro-static field in said conduit, said means including electrodes extending across the path of the gases in said conduit and with the elements thereof spaced 10 apart and permitting the gases to flow therethrough, alternate electrodes bein in the form of wire mesh screens and tie intermediate electrodes being inthe form of Wires spaced apart transversely of the length of the gas conduit. f

Signed at Salt Lake in'the county of Salt Lake and State of Utah this 23rd day of September, A. 13.1918.

' Ross BUXTON RATHBUN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3668836 *Jan 22, 1970Jun 13, 1972Chemical Construction CorpElectrostatic precipitator
US3798879 *Nov 29, 1971Mar 26, 1974Buderus EisenwerkAir filter with electrostatic particle collection
US3874858 *Jul 11, 1973Apr 1, 1975Ceilcote Co IncMethod and apparatus for electrostatic removal of particulate from a gas stream
US5695549 *Apr 5, 1996Dec 9, 1997Environmental Elements Corp.System for removing fine particulates from a gas stream
US5707428 *Aug 7, 1995Jan 13, 1998Environmental Elements Corp.Laminar flow electrostatic precipitation system
US5733360 *Apr 5, 1996Mar 31, 1998Environmental Elements Corp.Flue gas, back corona
US6398848Apr 26, 1999Jun 4, 2002American Electric Power ServiceChanging momentum of exhaust gas flow by drastically altering diameter of feed stream or deenergizing one or more static electric charging fields of electrostatic precipitator; fractionating coal exhaust gas
US6447580Jul 26, 2001Sep 10, 2002R. F. RidgewayElectrostatic precipitator
US6878192Dec 8, 2003Apr 12, 2005Ohio UniversityElectrostatic sieving precipitator
USRE30480 *Mar 28, 1977Jan 13, 1981Envirotech CorporationElectric field directed control of dust in electrostatic precipitators
EP1066609A1 *Mar 25, 1999Jan 10, 2001Sarnoff CorporationBead manipulating chucks with bead size selector
Classifications
U.S. Classification95/57, 96/77, 96/66
International ClassificationB03C3/40
Cooperative ClassificationB03C3/40
European ClassificationB03C3/40