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Publication numberUS1382394 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 21, 1921
Filing dateSep 20, 1916
Priority dateSep 20, 1916
Publication numberUS 1382394 A, US 1382394A, US-A-1382394, US1382394 A, US1382394A
InventorsRobert Spurgin
Original AssigneeRobert Spurgin
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin-bag
US 1382394 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. SPURGIN.

COIN BAG.

APPLICATION FILED SEPT. 20, I916.

Patented June 21, 1921.

PATENT OFFICE.

ROBERT SPURGIN, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS COIN-BAG.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented June 21, 1921..

Application filed September 20, 1916. Serial No. 121,132.

To all whom it may concern Be it known that I, ROBERT SPURGIN, a citizen of the United States, residing at Chicago, in the county of Cook and State of Illinois, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Coin-Bags, of which the following is a specification.

This invention relates in general to containers or packages, and has more particular reference to bags in which articles or commodities are stored and handled.

In banks and other places where large numbers of gold and silver coins are handled and stored, it is customary for convenience to use textile or fabric bags in which a predetermined number of coins of uniform value are placed. The bags are then tied around the top by means of a closing cord or tape, the ends of which are sealed together by sealing wax or the like upon which an impression is stamped. The value of the contents of the bag appears upon the side of the bag itself or upon a card or tag attached thereto. The coins are thus stored and handled in these bags which in many instances are not opened for long periods of time.

It has happened upon many occasions, while the bags were in storage or in transit, that the closing cord or tape tied around the upper end of the bag would be slipped off from the end of the bag by a clever person who would remove all or part of the coins in the bag and replace them by less precious articles of approximately similar weight and then slip the looped closing cord or tape back over the ends of the bag into the posi tion that it formerly occupied without breaking the seal, with the result that the theft would not be discoverd in many instances until long after it had been committed.

In order to defeat access to the interior of these coin bags without breaking the seal, severing the cord or cutting the bag, any of which mischievous acts can be quickly detected, it has heretofore been proposed to employ a specially constructed metal seal having a prong which projects into and through the fabric of the bag so as to prevent the seal from being slipped off with the cord. This seal, however, is very expensive and its purpose may be readily defeated without detection by simply filing or cutting off the prong. It also has been proposed to attach the cord or tape to the bag by threading it through the body of the fabric so that it cannot be moved longitudinally on the bag. These bags, however, are capable of being used many times, and since each oflicial opening of the bag necessitates cutting or severing the cord or tape it will be obvious that a new cord or tape can only be applied to the bag by means of a special needle by which the cord or tape can be again threaded through the fabric.

One of the primary objects of my present invention is to provide a means of attachment of the closing cord or tape to a coin bag which will effectually prevent the sealed cord from being slipped off from the end of the bag, and which will afford provision for the ready and easy attachment of a new cord to a bag without the use of any special needle or tool of any kind whatsoever.

' Another object of my invention is the provision of means for attaching the closing cord to a coin bag which, instead of injuring the fabric and weakening the bag at this point, in reality strengthens the bag and prevents injury to the fabric by pulls or strains exerted upon the cord.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of my invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings.

Referring to the drawings:

Figure 1. is a side view of an empty bag embodying my invention; 4

Fig. 2 is a-similar view of a filled and closed bag;

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary view showing the cord-attaching eyelet as it appears on the side opposite that shown in Fig. 1; and

Fig. 4 is a detail sectional view on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1.

By reference to the drawings, it will be observed that the body of the coin bag consists of a tubular container 5, preferably made of suitable textile fabric such as closely woven duck or drilling, having a bottom and one longitudinal seam preferably sewed with a non-ripping lock stitch so as to be sufliciently strong for the requirements of the i l 110 l attaching means consists of a metal eyelet 11 Which is passed through an opening punched in the fabric of the bag body and is then.

clenched down at both ends around the periphery of the opening so as to be permanently attached to the bag and at the same time to protect the fabric from tearing out or becoming Worn or chafed by strains exerted upon the cord 9. One end of the cord or tape is then inserted through the eyelet and a knot 12 is tied therein intermediate its ends so as to securely attach'the cord to the bag, leaving both ends of the cord free to be wrapped around the puckered upper end of the closed bag and tied as shown in Fig. 2. It will be obvious that with the cord attached to the bag in this manner it is impossible to slip the cord upwardly on the bag so as to release the top of the bag without severing the cord and thereby permit access to the contents of the bag.

While the eyeletll may be secured in place in any preferred position circumferentially of the bag adjacent to one end thereof when the bag is folded flat, I prefer to position it at the seam edge of the bag so that the shank of the eyelet passes, not only through thetwo outer plies of the bag body, but also through the tWo inwardly projecting free edges 6 of the fabric inside the seam 7. The eyelet thus embraces four plies of the fabric, thereby affording maximum anchorage for the eyelet and also serving to strengthen the seam and thereby add to the security of the bag.

After the bag has been closed and tied as shown in Fig. 2, the free ends 13 of the cord or tape are customarily laid over a tag 14 and permanently secured by sealing wax- 15 having a suitable impression seal applied thereto so that the bag 15 cannot be untied without breaking the seal. Since the cord cannot be untied without breaking the seal and since the eyelet prevents the cord from being slipped off from the end of the bag without breaking the seal, it is obvious that access cannot be gained to the interior of the bag without so injuring or destroying the seal, the cord or be quickly applied by simply inserting one end through the eyelet and then tying the cord intermediate its ends as shown in Fig. 1. It will be manifest that the application of a. new cord does not require a needle or any tool, as the end of the cord or tape can should be understood that the size, shape,

proportion and arrangement of the various parts may be varied within considerable limits, and it should also be obvious that my invention is not restricted in its use to coin bags, but that it is capable of embodiment in bags of various sizes and shapes adapted to contain any desired quantity or character 'of commodities or articles.

I claim:

1. A coin bag of textile or similar material having a longitudinal seam at one side thereof, the free edges of the material extending inwardly from said seam, and a metal eyelet extending through said free edges and through the adjacent plies of the bag so as to provide a permanent reinforced opening adjacent to-one edge of the bag adapted to receive a closing cord or tape.

2. A coin bag of textile or similar material having a longitudinal seam, the free edges of the material extending inwardly from said seam, a metal eyelet extending through said free edges and through the adjacent plies of the bag so as to provide a permanent reinforced opening adjacent to one edge of the bag, and a closing cord or tape passed through said eyelet and tied intermediate its ends to the latter.

ROBERT SPURGIN.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2849171 *Aug 31, 1953Aug 26, 1958Bemis Bro Bag CoBag with tie member for closing and carrying it
US2920670 *Sep 2, 1958Jan 12, 1960Mohlmann Harry WLitter bag
US4854735 *Nov 4, 1987Aug 8, 1989Ironclad, CorporationPlastic film bag with integral plastic film tie element, and associated fabrication methods
US4948268 *Mar 10, 1989Aug 14, 1990John C. MarrelliPlastic film bag with integral plastic film tie element, and associated fabrication methods
US5009517 *Feb 2, 1990Apr 23, 1991John C. MarrelliPlastic film bag with integral plastic film tie element, and associated fabrication methods
US5044775 *May 15, 1990Sep 3, 1991John C. MarrelliPlastic film bag with integral plastic film tie element, and associated fabrication methods
US6092932 *Jul 1, 1999Jul 25, 2000Pekala; Debra J.Reusable gift bag
US8985270Feb 6, 2014Mar 24, 2015Molded Acoustical Products Of Easton, Inc.Clean burn muffler packing with stitched fiberglass envelope
US9267406Feb 4, 2015Feb 23, 2016Molded Acoustical Products Of Easton, Inc.Clean burn muffler packing with stitched fiberglass envelope
EP0687634A3 *May 26, 1995Oct 30, 1996Franz TressBand-like closing element
WO2014164289A1 *Mar 7, 2014Oct 9, 2014Molded Acoustical Products Of Easton, Inc.Clean burn muffler packing with stitched fiberglass envelope
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/71, 383/5, D03/244
International ClassificationB65D33/16
Cooperative ClassificationB65D33/165
European ClassificationB65D33/16D4