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Publication numberUS1384515 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 12, 1921
Filing dateJul 6, 1920
Priority dateJul 6, 1920
Publication numberUS 1384515 A, US 1384515A, US-A-1384515, US1384515 A, US1384515A
InventorsConradson Conrad M, Prentice Conradson
Original AssigneeConradson Conrad M, Prentice Conradson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper towel
US 1384515 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. M. AND P. CONRADSON.

PAPER TOWEL.

APPLICATION FILED .IULY 6,1920.

1,384,515, Patefified July 12,1921.

[/VVENTOBS 5 CONRAD M CbA/EAosoA/ PEENT/CE Cb/VRA 050 CONRAD M. CONRADSON AND PRENTIGE CONRADSON, OF MADISON, WISCONSIN.

PAPER TOWEL.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented July 12, 1921.

Application filed July 6, 1920. Serial No. 394,093.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, CONRAD M. CommosoX and PRENTICE (oxnaosom citizens of the l'nited States, residing at Madison, in the county of Dane and State of Visconsin, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Paper Towels, of which the following is a specification.

The object of our invention is to provide a paper towel having a multiplicity of rough, broken edges which will rapidly absorb the moisture when the towel is rubbed over the hands or on the face.

The invention consists in a paper towel, as hereinafter described and particularly pointed out in the claims.

In the accompanying drawings forming part of thi specification,

Figure 1 is a view of a paper towel embodying our invention,

Fig. 2 is an enlarged detail view of a portion of the towel,

Fig. 3 is an enlarged section.

In the drawing, 2 represents a paper towel provided with a series of elongated perfora tions 3. These perforations are preferably made in the paper without removing any of the material, leaving ragged fibrous edges which will more readily absorb moisture than the machine-finished surface of the paper. The perforations may be made by dies or rolls, the material being pressed outwardly beyond the plane of the paper sheet and preferably the projecting edges of the perforations alternate on opposite sides of the paper. The perforations may be of any suitable shape, elongated, circular or oval, and they may be made as a step in the papertowel making operation or they may be made by a separate process.

'lhe perforations may be arranged to cover the entire surface of the sheet or made in any design or pattern, or the edge of the sheet may be left unperforated or with one or more strengthening bars of the paper across 1t.

As shown in Fig. 3, the perforations provide a series of rough edges 4 which, when the towel is rubbed over the hands or on the face, will contact with the wet surface and rapidly'absorb the moisture. In this way a paper towel may be much more eflicient than where the paper presents an unbroken finished surface.

lVe claim as our invention:

1. As a. new article of manufacture, a paper towel having a plurality of openings therein, the edges of said openings being rough and exposed for absorbing the moisture contacting therewith.

2. As a new article of manufacture, a paper towel having a plurality of perforations therein, the edges of said perforations being rough and pressed outwardly beyond the plane of the towel to absorb the moisture contacting therewith.

3. As a new article of manufacture, a paper towel having a series of perforations therein, the edges of said perforations being pressed outwardly upon opposite sides of the towel and adapted to rapidly absorb moisture on the hands and face.

4. As a new article of manufacture, a paper towel having a series of elongated slits formed therein in staggered relation, with the edges of said slits pressed outwardly beyond the plane of the towel, said edges being raw and broken for edgewise contact with the skin and the absorption of the moisture thereon.

In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our hands this 30th da of June, 1920.

CONRAD CONRADSON. PRENTICE CONRADSON.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2526076 *Mar 7, 1946Oct 17, 1950Kalamazoo Vegets Le ParchmentWashcloth, dishcloth, scouring cloth, and the like, and method of making the same
US3099854 *Jul 25, 1962Aug 6, 1963Goodloe Alfred MMaterial adapted for abrasive effect in use and scouring devices, pot cleaners and the like produced therefrom
US6202250 *Jan 19, 1999Mar 20, 2001Uni-Charm CorporationWiping sheet
US6684445 *Oct 26, 2001Feb 3, 2004Multi-Reach, Inc.One-piece mop swab
US6685274 *Oct 26, 2001Feb 3, 2004Multi-Reach, Inc.Method of manufacturing one-piece mop swab
US6733626 *Dec 21, 2001May 11, 2004Georgia Pacific CorporationApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US6887349 *Sep 5, 2002May 3, 2005Fort James CorporationApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US6989075 *Nov 17, 2000Jan 24, 2006The Procter & Gamble CompanyTension activatable substrate
US7037406 *Aug 6, 2003May 2, 2006Fort James CorporationCross-machine direction embossing of absorbent paper products having an undulatory structure including ridges extending in the machine direction
US7182838Mar 25, 2004Feb 27, 2007Georgia Pacific CorporationApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US7297226Feb 11, 2004Nov 20, 2007Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US7326322 *Nov 12, 2004Feb 5, 2008Georgia Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US7799176Oct 8, 2007Sep 21, 2010Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US7857941 *Dec 18, 2006Dec 28, 2010Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US8142617Aug 23, 2010Mar 27, 2012Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US8178025Dec 3, 2004May 15, 2012Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpEmbossing system and product made thereby with both perforate bosses in the cross machine direction and a macro pattern
US8287694Aug 17, 2010Oct 16, 2012Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US8535481Jun 13, 2012Sep 17, 2013Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpApparatus and method for degrading a web in the machine direction while preserving cross-machine direction strength
US8647105Apr 16, 2012Feb 11, 2014Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products LpEmbossing system and product made thereby with both perforate bosses in the cross machine direction and a macro pattern
US20100203285 *Jun 14, 2008Aug 12, 2010Mank GmbhNapkin
Classifications
U.S. Classification162/114, 162/194, 15/208
International ClassificationA47K10/00, A47K10/16
Cooperative ClassificationA47K10/16
European ClassificationA47K10/16