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Publication numberUS1385785 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 26, 1921
Filing dateOct 25, 1920
Priority dateOct 25, 1920
Publication numberUS 1385785 A, US 1385785A, US-A-1385785, US1385785 A, US1385785A
InventorsAlfred H Hofer, Luke T Wickey
Original AssigneeAlfred H Hofer, Luke T Wickey
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Steering mechanism
US 1385785 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. H. HOFER AND L. T. WICKEY.

STEERING MECHANISM. APFLICATION FILED OCT. 25,1920.

1,385,785. Patented y 26, 1921.

2 SHEETS-SHEET 1- 13 1.1.

Patented July 26, 1921.

2 SHEETSSHEET 2- A. H. HOFER AND L. T. WICKEY. STEERING MECHANISM. APPLICATION 'FILED OCT. 25, 1920. 1,385,785.

H W & I h M I UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

ALFRED H. HOFER, OF DAYTON; OHIO, AND LUKE '1. WICKEY, OF LOS ANGELES,

CALIFORNIA,

STEERING MECHANISH.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Jul so, 1921.

Application filed October 25, 1920. Serial NO. 419,481.

Our invention relates to steering mecha'-- nism particularly designed for aircraft in general, the broad object in view being to provide an irreversible self-locking rudder operating member which will remain in any position in which it is set, holding the rudder locked in a corresponding position and thereby relieving the aviator from physical and mental strain while flying on a straight away course.

The invention is particularly valuable when flying in cross winds or under any condition where it is necessary to maintain the vertical rudder at an angle to the normal path of flight and at an angle to the long tudinal axis of the machine.

A further object of the inventlon is to provide in conjunction with a rudder controlling member, usually consisting of what is known in the art as a foot bar, an auto matic clutch which will enable such foot bar to be readily moved by the aviator in the usual way for turning the rudder and yet upon removal of foot pressure w1ll lock the rudder controlling member in a temporarily the reaction of the propeller on the aerofoil surfaces.

With the above and other objects in view, ourinvention consists in the novel construction, combination and arrangement herein shown, described and claimed.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of the improved steering mechanism;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectlon through the same;

Fig. 3 is a horizontal sectlon through the center port10n of the device showing the clutch mechanism;

Flg. 4 1s a detail view of the manually operated member;

F g. 5 is a detail view of the rudder operatlng member.

In the standard steering mechanism now 7 employed in airplanes, what is knownas a foot bar is used, said foot bar being the initial controlling element for the vertical rudder. This member is manually operated and is hereinafter termed the manually operated member, the same being indicated in the drawing by reference character 1.

In carrylng out the present invention I employ in addition to the manually operated member or foot bar 1 a rudder operating member or bar 2. Both of the members 1 and 2 consist of two armed levers and both are mounted on a common central pivot member 3 to turn or oscillate thereon. The rudder operating member 2 is coupled by the connections 4: such as cables, to the rudder head or cross bar on the vertical rudder, not shown, the vertical rudder with its cross head being of well known construction and and thereby locking the vertical rudder against movement. Said clutch mechanism embodies a stationary or fixed annular clutch member 5 which is secured to a supporting bracket 6 fastened within the fuselage of the machine. The clutch mechanism also embodies a centrally arranged cam 7 which is permanently fastened with two flat head screws and moves with the rudder operating member 2. Between the cam 7 and the annular clutch member 5 are movable clutch members 8 shown in the form of balls or rollers which bear against both the cam 7 and the annular clutch member 5. The balls or movable clutch member 8 are arranged in pairs and between the balls of each pair there is arranged a thrust spring 9. This spring serves to press the balls 8 away from each other and into contact with the fixed clutch member 5 so that instantaneous gripping or clutching operation will take place between the earn 7 and the clutch member 5 whenthere is a tendency to turn the rudder gperating bar 2 and consequently the cam The manually operated member 1 has projecting therefrom dogs 10 shown in the form of segmental lugs which. extend within the annular clutch member 5 and between 5 the pairs of movable clutch members 8. The function of the dogs is to partially displace certain movable clutch members 8 and carry them to the directionin which manually operated member 1 1s turned, thereby releasing the clutch mechanism to permit the rudder operating bar 2 to be turned by manually operated member 1. In order to insure this operation, the segmental slots in rudder operating member, 2, are longer than the segmental dogs 10, Whlch permits manually operated member 1, to ro- 'tate sufficiently to release the ball clutch.

members 8-; further rotation of manually operated member 1 will rotate rudder operating member 2. It is to be understood that the cam 7 is loose with respect to plvot pm 3 so that it may turn thereon and 1t 1s to .be further understood that the segmental slots in rudder operating'member 2 are suf-' ficiently larger than dogs 10 to allow a small amount of play. This permits the dogs 10 to displace the balls 8 ahead of them, before cam 7 begins to turn under the propelling action of the member 1. i i

The operation of the mechanism may be described as follows:

The pilot pushes on the manually operated member 1 at either of the end portions thereof causing the movement of cam 7 and quently causing movement of the vertical rudder of the aircraft. 4 When the p lot pushes on themember land starts to turn the same, the dogs 10 press against opposite movable clutch members or balls 8, there being no clutching action during this movement. the dogs 10 due to the action of the springs 9. Such is the action when the manually operated member 1 is actuated by the foot of the pilot. As soon as the foot of the pilot is removed from the member 1, due to'wind pressure on the rudder, the latter of course tends to return to its normal position. This tendency is transmitted to cam 7. The cam now tries to turn backwardly to its normal osition, but due to the action of sprin '9, t e balls 8 are jammed against the stationary annular clutch member 5.

The rudder operating member 2 is thereby securely locked against movement, as is also the vertical rudder.

When it,is desired to release the clutch, pressure is brought to bear on the member 1 by the pilots foot at the opposite end from that which originally actuated the do 10 causing said dogs, which are in fact un ocking dogs, to thrust-said balls out of clutch ing engagement with the cam 7 and the sta- 5 tionary clutch member 5,-p'ushing the dogs the rudder operating member 2 and conse The other balls 8 are propelled by along a circular ath at the same rate as the cam is move The clutch is thus released so that the vertical rudder may be moved to the new position where it will be automatically locked upon the removal of the pilots foot from the rudder operating bar 1.

While the clutch mechanism is shown ap plied to the rudder controlling or steering means, it is to be-understood that the mechanism above described may also be used for controlling other parts of the machine such as the ailerons, engine controls and other devices which wlll suggest themselves.

What I claim is:

1. Irreversible self-locking steering mechanism for aircraft, embodying in combination, a centrally pivoted foot-operable steer- I ing bar, a centrally pivoted rudder. operating bar a cam operable by and having a fixed relation to said rudder-operating bar, an annular stationary clutch member, a movable clutch member adapted to effect a lock-' ing engagement between said cam and stationary c utch member, and means on said foot operable steering bar to release said movable clutch member.

2. Irreversible self-locking steering mechanism for aircraft, embodying in combina-- tion, a centrally ivoted foot-operable steering bar, a centra y pivoted rudder operating bar lyin parallel to said steering bar,

a camopera le by and having a fixed relation to said rudder-operating bar, an annular stationary clutch member, a movable clutch member adapted to effect a locking engagement between said cam and stationary clutch member, and means on said foot- 0 erable steering bar to release said mova le clutch member. I

3. Irreversible self-locking steering mechanism for aircraft, embodying in combination, a centrally givoted foot-operable steer,- ing bar, a centra ly pivoted rudder operating bar, a cam operable by and havm a fixed relation to said rudder-operating ar, and having an eccentric peripheral working face, an annular stationary clutch member,

a movable clutch member adapted to eifect a locking engagement between said cam and 11 stationary clutch member, and means on said foot operable steering bar to release said movab e clutch member.

4. Irre ersible self-locking steering meehanism for aircraft, embodying in combination, a centrally pivoted foot-operable steerng bar,"a centrally pivoted rudder operating bar, a cam operable by and havin a fixed relation to said rudder-operating ar, an annular stationary clutch member having an mternal working face concentric to the plvots of the foot-operable steering bar and the rudder-o crating bar, a movable clutch member a apted to effect a locking engagement between said cam and stationannular stationary clutch member, a movable clutch member adapted to efiect a looking engagement between said cam and statlonary clutch member, and means on said 15 foot-operable steering bar to release said movable clutch member.

In testimony whereof we aflix our signatures.

ALFRED H. HOFER. LUKE T. WIOKEY.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2449020 *Jun 14, 1943Sep 7, 1948Automatic Locking Devices IncPower drive
US2475159 *Apr 23, 1943Jul 5, 1949Automatic Locking Devices IncAdjusting and control device
US2583428 *Jun 4, 1946Jan 22, 1952Benjamin Houplain ReneIrreversible driving device
US2626027 *May 2, 1949Jan 20, 1953Boeing CoShaft coupling mechanism
US2870887 *Apr 12, 1954Jan 27, 1959Jr Howard W ColeTwo-way automatic locking actuators
US2934188 *Apr 1, 1957Apr 26, 1960Morse Chain CoIrreversible drive
US3198477 *Dec 27, 1961Aug 3, 1965Akron Brass CompanySelf-locking valve
US3319747 *Feb 15, 1965May 16, 1967Adams Rite Mfg CompanyLost motion drive with anti-feed back brake
US4852707 *Sep 7, 1988Aug 1, 1989Ntn Toyo Bearing Co., Ltd.Reversible self-locking clutch
US5248017 *Feb 3, 1992Sep 28, 1993Schwarzbich JoergRotation transmitting mechanism
US5617820 *Oct 17, 1995Apr 8, 1997General Motors CorporationConnecting rod for internal combustion engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification244/235, 74/495
International ClassificationB64C13/30
Cooperative ClassificationB64C13/30
European ClassificationB64C13/30